accessing internal HD using USB

Seagate / IDE
December 24, 2008 at 14:07:03
Specs: Windows XP, Intel
Hi all - I have a portable PC with a dead monitor and I need to recover files off the drive. I removed the HD from the portable, connecting it to my desktop using an adapter from my IT guys. That part worked great, but I can only see the files from the C Drive partition on the drive, not the D drive, where most of my files reside. Is there something I'm doing wrong? Do I need to adjust dip switches or jumpers? I'm using a Seagate 120 GB HD. Thanks


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#1
December 24, 2008 at 14:23:20
Have you taken OWNERSHIP of the Drive ???

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#2
December 24, 2008 at 14:26:48
I guess I'm not sure what you mean exactly. I have possession of the drive, it's connected now to my desktop, and I do own it, but is that what you mean? Sorry if I'm dense.

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#3
December 24, 2008 at 14:44:45
(edit) If it's not an ownership problem.
The D: partition might have been corrupted. In that case, you might have to use a "File Recovery' program.

The following explains 'Ownership'.
How to take ownership of a file or folder in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=...


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#4
December 24, 2008 at 14:55:23
I can see the drive, labeled F, with a partition size of about 32GB. I don't see the second partition from this drive, though, which has a larger partition size. Disk Management shows all other drives, even network drives and multi-partitioned other drives on the desktop, but not the second partition on this external HD, which has about 80 GB size.

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#5
December 24, 2008 at 15:24:48
Is the second partition shown as 'unallocated' in Disk Management?

Wait for others to respond, but from my experience the drive is lost to the system. When that has happened to me, I have had to repartition/format the disk to get it back.

I have had backups, so it wasn't a problem. If you don't have a backup, I suggest a File Recovery program. GetDataBack is excellent.


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#6
December 24, 2008 at 15:37:18
Disk Management shows only the one partition, but not the second. I've not had a problem in the past with this disk, so I suspect it's somehow not visible to my desktop. I don't think that the data are lost, just not visible... I hope!

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#7
December 24, 2008 at 19:30:56
try testdisk at http://www.cgsecurity.org/index.html?testdisk.html be sure to read the How-To-Use first.

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#8
December 25, 2008 at 00:44:01
If push comes to shove you may be able to recover files by using a live version of Linux. Knoppix is one that works. Knoppix installs to and runs from one CDR. Knoppix is a free 700MB download and you will need to burn it to disk.

If you can't see the partition Knoppix may not be able to see it either. Try testdisk.

You refer to the external drive. You mean the laptop drive don't you?

Did you try using an external monitor on the Laptop before you removed the drive?

You do understand that the drive letters will change when you connect the laptop drive via USB.

View the contents of all visible partitions to be sure you aren't just confusing one for another.


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#9
December 26, 2008 at 08:13:41
Thanks for all the great ideas. Othehill, I am referring to the laptop drive, which is now the external HD. I did not try to external monitor yet, but in my experience with using these, you need to specify to the system which is mon 1 and which is mon 2. of course the problem is that mon 1 is toast and it's tough to do this blind. I've checked carefully the drive letters and contents of the visible drive to be sure that i'm not confused. So, I'm sure that I have only the original C drive and the D drive is not visible to the PC. I will use the testdisk program next.

thanks.


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#10
December 26, 2008 at 08:33:12
I don't use laptops but I believe there is a keystroke that will enable the external monitor. You may not need to see anything on the screen to be able to enable one.

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#11
December 26, 2008 at 11:31:49
Usually a combination of Fn and F4.

The Fn being the function key, quite often in blue and the lower left of the keyboard.

A diplomat is a man who always remembers a woman's birthday but never remembers her age.
Robert Lee Frost


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#12
January 4, 2009 at 21:39:42
Hi all, thanks for the ideas. I solved the problem by removing all other devices that could have drive letter, hard booted the machine and then tried again. the system found both drives. I guess the drive letters confused the machine. thanks again

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