384MB Ram

Home built shuttle mb / Athlon 1700+ xp
April 8, 2009 at 20:02:38
Specs: Win XP, 384 MB
I have taken a used 6GB hard drive, installed WinXP, CA Anti Virus, and one weather program onto the drive. I upgraded to SP2. At that time I opened explorer and discovered the hard drive was designated as drive I: All programs and short cuts are pointed at drive I:
Before starting all this I did use partition magic V8.0 to do a security wipe of the 6GB drive. Once cleaned, I installed the 6GB drive in the machine. I booted from the CD using the WinXP (Upgrade) CD. I Deleted the partition, created a new partition, formatted and installed WinXP. The computer has an A drive and an internal 5in1 USB card reader. I disabled ALL USB ports in the CMOS setup. The hard drive continues to be drive I: Any thoughts on how th get the drive back to drive C: like it should be? It took the better part of today to get everything working perfectly with the exception of drive designation problem. If this is going to turn into a do-over, Can I Ghost the contents of the I: drive onto a different 13GB drive I have? Or will all the references to drive I: screw everything up?
Properties of drive I: looks like this:
File system = NTFS
Disk = 0
Type = Basic
Status = online
Partition style = Master Boot Record (MBR)
Capacity = 6142MB
Unallocated space = 0
Reserved space = 0
Volume = I:

Win XP Home SP2
AMD Athlon XP 1700+
1.47GHz, 384 MB Ram
Floppy = A:
CD/RW = G:
CD = H:
5in1 internal card reader is disabled in CMOS and I can’t see any of these drives in explorer.
For some reason the drives don't change automatically as I think they should. It's been awhile since I messed with XP configuration.
Any suggestions appreciated.
WB


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#1
April 8, 2009 at 20:18:52
You can't change the OS boot drive letter.

The card reader is probably your culprit.


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#2
April 8, 2009 at 20:36:20
Simple answer is don't waste any more time on this. You could care less what drive letter it is.

complex answer is there is a partition on that machine that really does have a few nt files on it. There will alway be a C: drive in xp.

again not worth the effort to figure out.

"Best Practices", Event viewer, host file, perfmon, antivirus, anti-spyware, Live CD's, backups, are in my top 10


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#3
April 8, 2009 at 20:57:30
Why would you go thru the trouble of using partition magic, then wipe out the partition during Windows setup? And why would you format a 6GB HDD as NTFS?

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Related Solutions

#4
April 8, 2009 at 20:57:42
Jefro,
Thanks for the reply. You are correct that I really don't care the drive is not C: I do care when things don't work as advertised. The reason I tried to wipe the drive using Partition Magic is that I picked it up at a yard sale and I didn't know it's history. IF there are NT files that shouldn't be there it seems wise to know what they are doing? At the very least I would like to troubleshoot so I KNOW what is going on and why. Once I know what's going on I will be content to leave as drive I:
Thanks,
WB

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#5
April 9, 2009 at 07:47:46
IMO, Partition Magic was an unnecssary step, I was just wondering what you were expecting to gain by using it. And you didn't answer my question as to why you formatted a 6GB drive using NTFS instead of FAT32?

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#6
April 9, 2009 at 09:24:46
Jam,
Good questions. Because I bought the HD at a yard sale for a buck I didn't know if the previous owner was plagued with viruses. In an attempt to be sure I had eradicated any viruses I used what I had on hand which was Partition Magic. After doing that I started fresh by booting from the WinXP CD. During the installation process it gave me the option to delete the partition. I figured what the heck. One more step to ensure no information was left by the previous owner. I figured that worse case it would take more time to delete, create and format the new partition but best case the hard drive would be configured by the WinXP process and would be guaranteed compatible with WinXP. Finally the default was offered as NTFS by the WinXP installation process. Should I have selected FAT32 instead?
Thanks,
WB

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