Solved Multiboot with Windows Vista Ultimate and Windows 7 Pro

Self build / N/A
September 19, 2016 at 20:03:32
Specs: Vista Ultimate, SP2, 3.0Ghz/2Ghz
Is it OK to have Vista Ultimate on one partition and 7 Professional on another? Do both operating systems have to be the same level? Can they be 64 bit and 32 bit?

See More: Multiboot with Windows Vista Ultimate and Windows 7 Pro

Reply ↓  Report •


#1
September 19, 2016 at 20:15:30
Is it OK to have Vista Ultimate on one partition and 7 Professional on another?
Yes.

Do both operating systems have to be the same level?
Not sure what you're asking.

Can they be 64 bit and 32 bit?
I'm pretty sure the boot loader allows this, yes.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

message edited by Razor2.3


Reply ↓  Report •

#2
September 20, 2016 at 07:07:09
Sure, it can be done, but I don't know why you'd want to keep Vista? I'm guessing Win7 is the 64-bit OS? How much RAM? Your specs say "2Ghz" but I assume you meant 2GB? That's the minimum for 64-bit. You really should upgrade to 4GB; more would be even better.

Reply ↓  Report •

#3
September 20, 2016 at 15:03:42
✔ Best Answer
If your comp is 64-bit capable, it will require double the memory/ram to run 64-bit Windows.
http://www.sevenforums.com/installa...

32-bit and 64-bit Windows: frequently asked questions
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-au/...

How do I tell if my computer can run a 64-bit version of Windows?
To run a 64-bit version of Windows, your computer must have a 64-bit-capable processor. To find out if your processor is 64-bit-capable, do the following:

Open Performance Information and Tools by clicking the Start button The Start button
, and then clicking Control Panel. In the search box, type Performance Information and Tools, and then, in the list of results, click Performance Information and Tools.
Click View and print detailed performance and system information.
In the System section, you can see what type of operating system you're currently running under System type, and whether or not you can run a 64-bit version of Windows under 64-bit capable. (If your computer is already running a 64-bit version of Windows, you won't see the 64-bit capable listing.)

message edited by Johnw


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 21, 2016 at 14:33:12
I'm already running 64 bit Vista Ultimate! Part of my question was do both OSes have to be the same version, i.e, Ultimate vs. Professional or Home. In other words, since I have a Vista Ultimate version, I don't necessarily have to get a Win 7 Ultimate version, right? Will Vista Ultimate and Win 7 Professional coexist on separate partitions?

Reply ↓  Report •

#5
September 21, 2016 at 14:46:34
"I don't necessarily have to get a Win 7 Ultimate version, right?"
Correct

"Will Vista Ultimate and Win 7 Professional coexist on separate partitions?'
Yes, they will have nothing to do with each other.


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
September 21, 2016 at 14:49:05
Why not? The active OS sees the inactive OS as just a bunch of files in a different volume. There's no interaction between them.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
September 21, 2016 at 17:21:55
Thanks for your answers. I'm more clear on this now!

Reply ↓  Report •

#8
September 23, 2016 at 09:29:18
I still question why you're sticking with Vista. You've posted about problems with IE9 & driver support. It's not going to get any better. Also, you asked this exact same question almost one year ago to the day. The Vista market share has since dropped to 1.05%. Twice as many people run Linux than Vista...that should tell you something.

http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...


Reply ↓  Report •


Ask Question