Extended partitions?

June 22, 2009 at 19:26:51
Specs: WinXP, 1.5Ghz, 256MB
I am doing a clean install of Vista. I want to create 10 partitions on a 1 TB drive. Should I make one primary and the others secondary? Any advantage to making 3 primaries and the rest extended? I also intend to make this a multiboot. Thanks.

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#1
June 22, 2009 at 19:44:26
Why 10? Couldn't you do like three or four? I'm not a big fan of hodgepodge partitioning. But that's just me, maybe you have a compelling reason for doing it.

Jabbering Idiots: Everywhere You Look!


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#2
June 22, 2009 at 19:52:30
In XP you can have up to 4 primary partitions or 3 primary partitions and 1 extended partition (which itself can have many secondary partitions). So, if you only want to install Windows XP, but insist on having 10 partitions total, I would do one primary with the OS on it, then an extended partition with 9 secondary or "logical" partitions contained in it.

-Ryan Adams
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#3
June 23, 2009 at 01:44:34
I want to have ten partitions in order to install new versions of Windows in the future. I first thought of one primary and the rest extended but then that would be a long boot menu with ten OSes listed. Then I thought 3 primaries and extended parts on each would be better. First primary would have three extended and primary 2 and 3 would each have two extended. This would allow up to ten separate OSes to be installed but the most the boot menu would list would be four on primary one and three on primary two and three. What do you think?

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#4
June 23, 2009 at 01:55:50
You can't put extended partitions in primary partitions...

-Ryan Adams
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#5
June 23, 2009 at 09:35:10
Interesting idea but by the time 10 more versions of Windows have come out, that drive will be on it's last leg if it even still works. Not to mention that in 10 versions from now I seriously doubt it will run on your current machine ( just imagine trying to instal Vista on a computer that was built during the days of Windows 3.1). How about getting a removable drive bay and just using different drives for the new OS's when they come out.

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#6
June 23, 2009 at 15:57:52
or buy a 300Gb drive and partition that, edit in msconfig to only show certain os, and use your 1TB for storage

Vista nVidia Evolution SP2
Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU E6550 @ 2.93GHz
XFX GeForce 9800 GTx

3GB OCZ DDR3 PC3-12800 Platinum Edition
2x Samsung 1TB Spinpoint F1


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#7
June 23, 2009 at 16:36:58
Thanks for your responses folks. There's some good suggestions. Earlier I didn't use the correct language. I meant create an extended partition on each primary and then divi up into logical drives. Create three logical drives on the first primary (enough for four OSes), then create two logical drives on each of the other primaries (enough for six more OSes). Then to boot up to one or the other primary, use Windows 98 floppy, run FDISK, make the appropriate partition active, remove floppy and reboot. What do you think of that? This way you don't need a boot manager.

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#8
June 23, 2009 at 17:29:48
Most of the time you can only have one extended partition. That can be sub-divided into multiple logical drives.

-Ryan Adams
Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com

Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#9
June 23, 2009 at 19:03:38
I seem to be lost on the 10 OS contigency reasoning.

For what it's worth, there are only so many OSes that are prevalent on home PCs & the majority of them are all under the Windows umbrella. While multi-booting is not nearly as cumbersome as it used to be years back, it still requires some due diligence & even when you've managed to load all the plethora of OSes you desire on the machine, you do realize you aren't going to be spending much time on the majority of them at the end of the day & they are going to end up pretty much taking up space that probably could be better allocated to data backup or file storage. So, you might want to think this 10 OS thing through before embarking on it.

I've had Kubuntu; XP Pro & Vista on this machine for a while, then I added Server 2008 Enterprise & Windows 7 later came onto the mix as well. I pulled the Linux & Server 2008 install recently as I haven't really been booting into neither that much as of late. IMHO, if you are pretty much set on installing several OSes on the machine, you may want look into virtualization, since it could save the unending reboots when you have to switch from one OS environment to another.

Good luck!

Jabbering Idiots: Everywhere You Look!


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#10
June 23, 2009 at 19:23:25
Thanks folks. Sabertooth, you make a valid point about not using some OSes anymore. I have a machine with 98SE, NT, 2000 and XP and lately I've been using mostly XP. On that machine, I created two logical data drives and I can save files anywhere I want because FAT16 and NTFS are on the system. But anyway, thanks to everyone for your responses. I think I may just do a primary and an extended, put Vista on the primary and worry about creating logical drives later.

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