Date and time changed on Windows Vista computer

Self build / N/A
October 22, 2014 at 14:18:05
Specs: Vista Ultimate, SP2, 3.0Ghz/2Ghz
When I turned on the computer today I noticed that the date and time had changed. It was October 29, 2035! I do not remember changing the date and time. I set it to the correct time and scanned the computer for malware. I did not find any. Has this happened to anyone else? Is there a malicious virus that does this sort of thing. I guess if I turn on the computer the next time and the date and time are incorrect, I may have a CMOS problem and need to replace the battery. The motherboard is a couple years old now.

See More: Date and time changed on Windows Vista computer

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#1
October 22, 2014 at 15:58:48
If it has a coin sized battery (usually CR2032) it is best try that first as they are inexpensive and easy to replace.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
October 22, 2014 at 18:45:51
I googled "october 29, 2035" just to see if some malware was setting that particular date and got 'about 99,900 results' but none virus-related. Apparently a lot of web sites that have day-by-day schedules use a date algorithms that opens the page with that date even if it doesn't exist. It seems to work with all futuristic dates. At least that's the only thing I could think of. For a minute there I thought I was Rip Van Winkle and had just woke up.

But yeah, try a new battery. Usually a bad battery loses time but a new one is cheap enough and then you'd know for sure if that was it.

Oh, October 29, 2035 is a Monday.


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#3
October 23, 2014 at 08:03:41
October 29, 2035 is a Monday
I'll look out for it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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Related Solutions

#4
October 23, 2014 at 13:26:14
Thanks for your responses! I'm relieved that it is not virus related. I haven't turned on the computer yet. I'm hoping the date and time reset took. If not, then it's time for a new battery.

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#5
October 23, 2014 at 13:40:46
Well, it could be virus related but there's no info on that date being associated with it. I've heard of some software causing a clock change but then only a few hours or days, not several decades. However you might want to watch the clock status and see if it changes while running any particular software.

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#6
October 23, 2014 at 15:22:15
I'm with DAVE on this - a virus is always a possibility but the ones that mess with the clock are rare.

If you want a quick malware / virus check download, install, update and run this freebie from the green box top right:
http://filehippo.com/download_malwa...

This program will usually show something if there is anything about. If it finds anything the best bet is to copy / paste the log on here so that we get a clue about what is going on.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
October 29, 2014 at 21:16:34
Looks like it's time for a new CMOS battery. The date on the computer this time was October 27, 2075! Nothing like opening the box and seeing inside after a couple years!

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#8
October 29, 2014 at 22:02:15
Let us know if that fixes it.

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#9
October 30, 2014 at 06:22:26
CyberDude, it didn't look like this did it?:

http://www.technibble.com/articleco...

It's always been my understanding that a failing CMOS battery will take you back in time but it's a cheap enough way to rule it out for sure.

Never seen the time jump around like that myself. Has me stumped.


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#10
November 2, 2014 at 20:24:15
No the dust build up is not that bad! I haven't had time to do the battery switch yet but when I do I will let you folks know what happens. In the meantime, I'm using my other computer.

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#11
November 8, 2014 at 08:32:56
Update! Before going to buy a new CMOS battery, I went into the BIOS and changed the date and time. I then shut off the computer, waited 10 seconds and turned it on again; the date and time stayed. Have no idea why it would have changed. I did notice some dust buildup on the side chassis exhaust fan. I quess I should clean that up in case heat buildup was the culprit. All my other settings in the BIOS seem to be OK. I have the ASUS P5Q Deluxe motherboard. I don't remember if I had the Ai Overclock tuner set to auto or manual. On Manual, you can set the external CPU frequency to match the frequency of the front side bus. I may have it set to 333Mhz CPU to 1333 FSB. Anyway, does it matter that this is auto or manual? My CPU is a Intel Duo-Core 3 Ghz.

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#12
November 8, 2014 at 09:54:44
Sometimes things get retained on the motherboard chips, which get released when the capacitors discharge. Let's hope that's what it was. Just for info this is the best discharge procedure:
Turn off computer then disconnect from domestic power supply and also remove main battery if it's a laptop. Hold the Power Off/On button down for at least 20 seconds.

Keep looking to see what others think about the Auto -v- Manual but as it's now behaving itself then presumably the present setting is OK.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#13
November 8, 2014 at 13:40:26
I spoke too soon! The first time I waited 10 seconds and the date and time kept. The second time I waited longer than a half hour or so and the date is messed up again. So for sure it's the CMOS. While I'm in there, I'll check for any dust build up too.

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#14
November 8, 2014 at 14:12:11
OK, sometimes batteries temporarily work again if not used for a bit so maybe that is what happened to your CMOS battery.

Clean the CPU heat sink while you are in there (without removing it) as well as the fans and vents. A small brush can be useful. Let us know how you get on - maybe give it a few days if it seems OK afterwards.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#15
November 8, 2014 at 17:36:44
If you're not an overclocker leave the setting on auto. This is a clocked down stable setting that prevents component overheating and instability. If you want to tweak component speed settings because you need / want higher performance research what others have used and adjust in minute increments and test stability. Too high adjustments can cause critical damage to components, especially CPU. I had a friend with a P5Q board that cooked his brand new CPU by making one big adjustment.

The dust build up picture I posted was just my obscure sense of humour. That's an extreme case of dust build up. I hope I didn't offend.

When dealing with dust never use a vacuum cleaner to help with the task. The rushing air from a vacuum can cause static discharge and you don't want this. Using a small brush as Derek has explained and blowing with you mouth can do a decent clean in and around the heatsink, fins and fans. Also you can buy compressed air specifically for blowing around the inside of PCs.


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#16
November 12, 2014 at 14:30:20
Hello folks,

I haven't had the time to replace the battery yet but everytime I don't use the PC for a while and then turn it back on, it has some weird date. So, I'm definitely going to change the battery. I was getting sidetracked trying to remember the settings I made in the BIOS but I think I'll stick with the auto settings. My memory is DDR2 667 Mhz. I think I had CPU at 333 Mhz and FSB at 1333 Mhz. I don't remember wheter I had CAS latency set either. I'm not a real power user anyway so I guess auto is good enough. As I was going over this, I wondered why do I have to write down the BIOS settings because I'm changing the battery? Seems to me if the date and time are not keeping, then any other settings must have reverted to the factory defaults. Am I right? I know this seems like a simple question but I've read articles which say you must write down whats in the BIOS because when you take the battery out it will lose the settings. I don't know if I agree with that. In my case, the battery is no longer keeping the date and time and it seems like the other settings changed also. So, why the need to record the settings?


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#17
November 12, 2014 at 14:41:45
You're correct in deducing that a faulty battery will impair your BIOS settings across the board.

Because your times appear random I'm not sure that the battery would be the cause. I've only ever seen old dates (BIOS manufacturer dates) appear when a battery is the culprit.

To be honest it has me stumped how the time jumps forwards by decades.

An idea to isolate the problem to software or hardware is to run a Linux live cd and see if it holds time. If the time remains true then you can comfortably say that Windows Is the culprit.

message edited by btk1w1


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#18
November 12, 2014 at 20:04:15
Longest discussion ever about changing the cmos battery.

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#19
November 13, 2014 at 17:16:27
I replaced the CMOS battery today. After the computer is off for a couple hours, I'll start it up again and see if the battery has kept the date and time. I didn't mention before but the CMOS battery was the original and has been in the system for five or more years.

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#20
November 13, 2014 at 17:33:03
Yep, let us know how you get on.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#21
November 14, 2014 at 08:11:46
The date and time have been retained! The CMOS battery needed to be replaced. I also cleaned up any dust buildup on the case and CPU fans. The dust wasn't very much but I decided to clean it up while I had the case open.

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#22
November 14, 2014 at 08:13:42
Thank you to all who responded!

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