Computer Won't Boot

Toshiba
May 9, 2008 at 18:11:53
Specs: Vista, 2 GB

Hi, I have an unexpected problem with my new Toshiba laptop. I was browsing sites and suddenly it froze. Nothing was working so I had to manually turn it off with the power button. When I turned it back on it took me to a screen that said something like Load Computer Repair Files or Start Normally. Neither of these options start it. It will sometimes stay on the loading screen, sometimes it will get off that and go back to the previous screen, sometimes it will turn black and the cursor will appear and it's movable but nothing else happens. Also it won't run in safe mode, it stops at cdcdisc or something like that, I don't remember exactly. What happened to it and what can I do??

See More: Computer Wont Boot

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#1
May 9, 2008 at 18:17:23

It could be almost anything. It could be your RAM, hard disk, or your laptop's motheboard. If it's still under warranty I'd return it. If you don't want to do that, you can test the RAM with Memtest86+. You could also download a hard disk diagnostic from the website of your hard drive's manufacturer.

Don't post if you ate razor blades for breakfast!


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#2
May 9, 2008 at 18:22:57

How can I download for it when I can't get more than 3 screens into it? Sorry, I'm computer illiterate and don't really understand what you mean. It's still under warranty but I'd rather not return it just yet, instead I'd like to try and get it starting myself because I have some questionable things downloaded to the desk top, LOL!

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#3
May 9, 2008 at 18:44:53

That's ok. I assumed that you must have a computer that works since you're posting here. Download and burn Memtest86+ onto a CD with a PC that works and then insert the disc into your laptops CD/DVD drive and then turn the laptop on. If your laptop's BIOS is set to boot the disc before the hard drive, Memtest should start automatically. If not, you'll have to set the boot order in the BIOS. To do so, turn on your computer and then start repeatedly pressing the DEL/Delete key on your keyboard until you see a screen with things to select. If that doesn't work, try F1, F2, F10 and F12 (the key to enter the BIOS varies with each PC model). Once in there, look for Boot Sequence (you may have to look around a little to find it). When you find it, use your keyboard to make the CD/DVD drive the first boot device (or before the hard drive). Save your settings and reboot. Memtest should boot from the disc and start testing your RAM. Let it test 3 or 4 hours.

You can get Memtest here: http://www.memtest.org/download/2.0...

Download and unzip that. Go into your CD Burning application and select to burn an Image. Browse to where you saved the image and double click it. DON'T add the image to a Data CD because it won't work that way. Some people get this mixed up a little. If you don't use any CD Burning applications, you can download CDBurnerXP which is free.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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Related Solutions

#4
May 9, 2008 at 19:14:55

I've done what you have suggested but can't get the Memtest to start so I think all I have are Data CDs. Those are the ones you can burn mp3s onto correct? Also I just burn the .IMG and not the file called BOOT? I really appreciate the help by the way. It must get frustrating helping those with so little understanding of how this works.

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#5
May 9, 2008 at 20:55:38

Sorry for the slight delay. Yep Data CD's/MP3 CD's are fine. Any readable CD/DVD will work.

Sorry about the Memtest file you downloaded. It was confusing for me and wasn't what I thought it was. I downloaded Memtest and created the bootable CD image that I thought was the first link I gave. I've uploaded it here: http://www.hotlinkfiles.com/files/1... Download it. Use the link below to make a bootable CD with it.

http://wizardskeep.org/mainhall/tut...

If you use Nero Express, on the first screen click Burn Disc Image or Saved Project. Select the .ISO that you downloaded from my link. Click Next and then Next again to start Burning.

I really think the problem is with your RAM. I could be wrong. This program should show whether or not the RAM is the culprit.

BTW, you being "illiterate" doesn't irritate me at all. I work with people all the time who claim they don't know much about PCs and I enjoy it.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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#6
May 9, 2008 at 22:13:43

OK, thanks for this. I'll give what you said a try and let you know. By the way, if it is my RAM, will this fix the problem or is it just going to let me know if something is wrong? What should I be looking for when using it? Also is there any way I could do more damage by doing this if I don't do it correctly? I'm worried about messing things up even more since I'm not used to doing stuff like this.

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#7
May 9, 2008 at 22:44:48

It won't fix the problem, but will let you know if the RAM is bad. While running, keep an eye on the Errors column. Also keep an eye to see if your PC freezes during the test (I've seen this happen before).

Don't worry, you won't mess one thing up doing this, unless you carelessly change certain other settings in the BIOS other than the Boot Sequence. The longer you run Memtest, the better. Most people say a few minutes to a few hours is OK (which is why I suggested 3 or 4 hours) but personally I'd run it for atleast 18 hours. You can decide whatever is comfortable for you.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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#8
May 9, 2008 at 23:13:45

... you could be barking up the wrong tree

... JAYROCK try tapping F8 key@ boot-up
select "safe mode command prompt" if it'll let you.

... then type bcdedit /enum [press ENTER]

... post the contents here

... happy typing

Grrrr
wat do I know?
... got brain freeze


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#9
May 10, 2008 at 09:26:26

The OP said he couldn't access Safe Mode.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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#10
May 10, 2008 at 11:15:29

JAYROCK,

Did you install anything lately or right around the time the issue reared its head?

Very seldom is the HDD responsible for a crcdisk error ... but still likely.

In this case, I am more of the opinion that this is a software related issue. How about trying to run System Restore from safe mode with command prompt?


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#11
May 10, 2008 at 11:35:16

Sabertooth:

No harm intended, but how is the OP going to run System Restore from Safe Mode if he can't get to Safe Mode in the first place?

I'm also curious as to what makes you think it's a software issue.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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#12
May 10, 2008 at 11:57:30

None taken.

Safe mode with command prompt is sometimes a viable accessibility option when the other isn't.


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#13
May 10, 2008 at 12:01:13

Oh I see. Thanks.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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#14
May 10, 2008 at 12:21:33

No problem.

As to why I think this is more than likely a sofware issue ... see below.

"Hi, I have an unexpected problem with my new Toshiba laptop."

Chances of getting bad RAM with a new machine is bound to be staggering.

"I was browsing sites and suddenly it froze. Nothing was working so I had to manually turn it off with the power button."

This is not uncommon with Windows & quite frankly it has always been one of the "perks" of using any flavor of M$' OS .... LOL!

"When I turned it back on it took me to ascreen that said something like Load Computer Repair Files or Start Normally."

Ditto my immediate response above.

"Neither of these options start it. It will sometimes stay on the loading screen, sometimes it will get off that and go back to the previous screen..."

Usually this is the result of a driver; firmware; system or a third-party file stifling Windows from being able to successfully complete the boot routine.


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#15
May 10, 2008 at 12:33:23

Well based on my opinion, I've never had problems with Windows XP or Windows Vista freezing unless it was a RAM problem. Windows 95, 98 and ME froze quite often, but not 2000/XP/Vista.

"Chances of getting bad RAM with a new machine is bound to be staggering."

I don't understand where you get that idea from. I've seen people buy new sticks of RAM from the store, take it home, install it, and then they get freeze-ups. After testing it (e.g. with Memtest) they see that the new RAM is bad. While the OP bought a new laptop and not RAM, the RAM that was preinstalled in the laptop is new and has just as much a possibility to go bad as any other new stick someone may have bought as an upgrade. Some RAM problems get worse over time and may have not been noticeable at first.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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#16
May 10, 2008 at 14:07:21

"Well based on my opinion, I've never had problems with Windows XP or Windows Vista freezing unless it was a RAM problem. Windows 95, 98 and ME froze quite often, but not 2000/XP/Vista."

By totally dismissing or nullifying the arguably omnipresent reality of (Non-RAM related) lockups, (albeit quite minimal in Vista) as compared to XP, but present all the same: you are unrealistically painting an "opinionated" mural of a Windows environment that is more of a myth. That or you are playfully being disingenuous. Either way, that assertion is not in the least fact based -- you can deny it, but it does not change the fact of the matter.

I mean, c'mon, I really don't want to believe you just made that assertion, especially not on a computer help forum. Of the literally hundreds of (frequent & non-frequent) lock-up inquiries posted for help in the XP forum for instance, I can guarantee, that the % directly attributable to nothing else but bad RAM is quite small. This is of course not counting insufficient RAM as part of bad RAM issues. More often than not, the problem is like I stated in response #14: "driver; firmware; system or a third-party file" oriented. Just because your machine is allegedly an exception, doesn't make it a non-existing occurrence.

"I don't understand where you get that idea from."

Thank you for touching on that ... see below

"I've seen people buy new sticks of RAM from the store, take it home, install it, and then they get freeze-ups. After testing it (e.g. with Memtest) they see that the new RAM is bad."

One of the unintended consequences of the continuing non-complexity of the PC hardware matrix, as well as the cheap & easy accessibility to its applicable components is that: anyone capable of replacing a light bulb can attempt to put together a PC from the scratch with little to no instructions. But you know what, many a times, the -- freeze-up -- issue has nearly everything to do with compatibility than it does defective memory modules as those folks often later found out, simply because Memtest is not, in an of itself, a comprehensive indicator or system compatibility guarantor. You are more than welcome to again dismiss this statement. But it's not going to change anything.

"While the OP bought a new laptop and not RAM, the RAM that was pre-installed in the laptop is new and has just as much a possibility to go bad as any other new stick someone may have bought as an upgrade."

Nor really ... LOL!

The term "Dodgy RAM" got its infamy from the various nefarious outlets through which unsuspecting folks have obtained their "new" memory modules. Joe Blow's "new" memory module that he bought via fleabay from Joe Dirt is not nearly as reputable as the "new" stick(s) Toshiba would equip a brand new retail notebook with, so I beg to differ there.

"Some RAM problems get worse over time and may have not been noticeable at first."

Lastly, the above has been one of the few & unsubstantiated memory claims floating around on the internet. I don't believe memory goes bad like bread that gets moldy over time. Maybe I'll change my mind when I see some convincing proof to the contrary ... who knows ;-)

For now, my take is, it (the memory) is either working or not. However, not working may not mean that it is bad, because it may just be that it is incompatible with the system it is being installed in.

EDIT: Nor really ... LOL! -- Not really

Thanks for spotting that Rayburn. Damn soft keyboard arggh!


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#17
May 10, 2008 at 14:48:10

Why do you always nitpick at everything I say? EVERYTHING I said was from experience. YOU can disagree all you want, but the facts don't change. I only post what I KNOW is true, regardless of whether you think so or not.

"By totally dismissing or nullifying the arguably omnipresent reality of (Non-RAM related) lockups, (albeit quite minimal in Vista) as compared to XP, but present all the same: you are unrealistically painting an "opinionated" mural of a Windows environment that is more of a myth. That or you are playfully being disingenuous. Either way, that assertion is not in the least fact based -- you can deny it, but it does change the fact."

I'm NOT implying that RAM problems are the only cause of lockups! I want you to read response #1 very carefully. I said, "It could be almost anything." I only named a few causes. Lockups are consistent with RAM problems. Of course it can be software related, but dude, I'm just basing the OP's problem on MY experience/opinion, not yours. You totally misunderstood what I meant.

Also, why would I try to be "playfully disingenuous"? It IS fact based. If it wasn't, I wouldn't have said it. Like I said, I said everything I did from experience.

""While the OP bought a new laptop and not RAM, the RAM that was pre-installed in the laptop is new and has just as much a possibility to go bad as any other new stick someone may have bought as an upgrade."

Nor really ... LOL!"

That's spelled "Not really." LOL! Your EBay analogy doesn't make sense. EBay has nothing to do with what I said. I'm saying that preinstalled RAM has just as much the possibility of going bad as any new stick that was bought from a place such as CompUSA or Newegg, not EBay.

"One of the unintended consequences of the continuing non-complexity of the PC hardware matrix, as well as the cheap & easy accessibility to its applicable components is that: anyone capable of replacing a light bulb can attempt to put together a PC from the scratch with little to no instructions. But you know what, many a times, the -- freeze-up -- issue has nearly everything to do with compatibility than it does defective memory modules as those folks often later found out, simply because Memtest is not, in an of itself, a comprehensive indicator or system compatibility guarantor. You are more than welcome to again dismiss this statement. But it's not going to change anything."

Why should it change anything? Recently a guy that I heard about had a problem with some new RAM that he bought. He installed it. It caused his computer to act strange (freeze-ups, etc.). He tested it with Memtest and found a few errors. He had it replaced with the SAME TYPE and all was well after that. This is just one of the many examples of what I'm saying.

If Memtest is not, as you say, a "comprehensive indicator or system compatibility guarantor," then why was it created, and why are people using it? I've used it in the past, and I know it works!

If the problem was with a driver, any Safe Mode option should work because in Safe Mode, only generic drivers are used.

I kindly ask you to stop your nitpicking. But if you continue, so will I. I'm not here to debate anything, but to be helpful. But if you want a debate, fine I'll give it to you. Otherwise, please kindly leave me alone because I know what I'm talking about.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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#18
May 10, 2008 at 15:16:31

Dude -- No one is nitpicking you. But then again, maybe you feel you should be -- for whatever reason I do not know.

AFAICT, my Response #10 had nothing whatsoever to do with you & I even made that unequivocally clear in Response #12 & #14, I am sorry if I fail to anticipate your trolling agenda or preconceived notion subsequently masked as Response #15.

There is nothing personal to argue about, anybody who happens to come across this thread in its entirety can read & draw their conclusion.

Good luck!


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#19
May 10, 2008 at 15:38:30

Hi guys, thanks for the help. So far nothing has worked though and I think I'm just going to take it into the shop because I'm clueless as to what to do. I've tried all the safe modes but they freeze at crcdisk, I knew enough to try that. And last known config, etc. but they don't work. Depending on what I try I get a different result. Sometimes last known config and or start windows normally take me to the Vista green progress bar, then I'll get a split second of blue screen, then it just restarts itself. If I try to repair files it will go past the green progress bar screen, turn black, and sometimes a moveable cursor will appear but nothing farther than that. I tried burning a Vista recovery CD and it booted it, pressed any key on the any key screen, took a minute or two for Windows to load all the files but then gets stuck at the green progress bar. I googled my problem and noticed it's actually very common, lots of people seem to have it. But the solutions didn't make too much sense to me and most of them seemed to be caused by adding more to your computer which I didn't. Some said updating the bios works but I don't know how to do that so I think I'm just going to leave it up to the guys at the shop. If anyone has suggestions on what my problem could be I'd still like to hear them and try them out before I take it in which should be later tonight or tomorrow sometime. If not that's cool. Also I don't recall installing anything new. The computer is a couple of months old btw and I had no problems up until recently.

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#20
May 10, 2008 at 15:51:10

"If I try to repair files it will go past the green progress bar screen, turn black, and sometimes a moveable cursor will appear but nothing farther than that."

Well Sabertooth, maybe it is a hardware problem after all.

You never did comment about what I said about Safe Mode using generic drivers. Maybe you think I'm right after all.

"Dude -- No one is nitpicking you."

No-one except you. Whatever you call it that you're doing, please stop.

"But then again, maybe you feel you should be -- for whatever reason I do not know."

That's one of your crazy ideas. Why would I feel I should be nitpicked on? You don't know, and neither do I. So that statement isn't true.

"AFAICT, my Response #10 had nothing whatsoever to do with you & I even made that unequivocally clear in Response #12 & #14, I am sorry if I fail to anticipate your trolling agenda or preconceived notion subsequently masked as Response #15."

I never said that Response #10, 12, or 14 had anything to do with me. It's #16 when you started your criticism/nitpicking/debating/whatever you call it.

I hate having to deal with people like you. CN seems to be full of them.

JAYROCK: How did Memtest work out? Please do me a favor and let me know what you find out from the shop. I'd really appreciate it! I still think it could be a RAM or hardware problem.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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#21
May 10, 2008 at 16:43:46

If you take it in to a store, what they are going to do is charge you arbitrarily for something you probably could fix in the comfort of your own home -- reload Windows.

There are certain things to be aware of:

Having the shop reload Windows on your machine might involve data loss and/or even result in subsequent activation issues, depending on what disc & what version of Windows they end up loading on the system.

This is a two month old machine & you could potentially void the machine's warranty if mishandled at the store.

I assume your machine did not come with a *real* Windows disc since you had to burn a Windows recovery disc during the process of resolving this issue. You might want to contact Toshiba Support to obtain the applicable disc(s) for your machine; the request may or may not even require a nominal fee .... who knows.

If there isn't anything on the machine that you care for & you feel confident enough to have it fixed at the shop, then good luck with it. Oh & BTW, what is the model # of this notebook?


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#22
May 10, 2008 at 16:59:40

I agree. Personally I would do it myself. Taking it to a shop is pretty expensive. Doing it yourself helps you learn.

Make sure Jesus is your Saviour!


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#23
June 29, 2008 at 20:15:22

Jayrock, this sounds almost exactly like the problem I'm having. Two O'clock yesterday afternoon I was given the dreaded "blue screen" error message just before my machine restarted itself. Didn't have time to read the message and the restart was unsuccessful.

Nothing works.

It has only done one thing differently and it only did that one time.

It said ERR1ERR3 following the "HP INVENT" screen. So, I hit enter - seemed like a reasonable thing to do *shrugs*. It responded by trying to establish some kind of link and when it failed to do so, it told me to check the media cable. Huh? The what? ...but oh well, hasn't said that again - but it hasn't done anything else, either.

I've been running Memtest for a couple of hours as you suggested, Rayburn. Nothing so far, but I'll let you know what the results are.

Any help you can give me would be appreciated more than you know.

As for you, Sabertooth: You speak with a great deal of authority and yet you give nothing helpful. You seem to have knowledge, do something constructive with it and give me a hand with my computer. If you would rather not... don't.


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#24
June 29, 2008 at 20:38:36

Wow I'm glad someone sees it my way for once...lol! I tried to get through to him.

The media cable message you're getting means that it's trying to boot off of the network. This could mean that your Hard Drive is not being detected, thus causing the BIOS to go to the next boot device, which is the network. It also could possibly mean the IDE or SATA controller is going bad on the motherboard.

EDIT: Googling ERR1ERR3 means a disk error. If this is a laptop, remove the hard drive and reinstall it. Try turning the laptop on while you have the laptop tilted in various orientations as well. This is known to work until it can be taken for repair.

WinSimple Software


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#25
June 30, 2008 at 08:48:30

=) That was a fast reply, I'm impressed.

I'm still running Memtest. 14 1/2 hours and 38 passes, but it hasn't found anything yet.

I tested the hard drive with BIOS. It's a forty minutes test which took about 10 seconds, after which it informed me that the test failed. That seems consistent with your diagnoses.

I've never had to uninstall and reinstall a hard drive, so I have no idea how to go about it. Should I just take it in and have it repaired?

And if this is a hardware problem, could my laptop have overheated?

Thanks again, I appreciate you getting back to me so quickly.


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#26
June 30, 2008 at 11:28:12

You're very welcome. I think in your case, you can assume the RAM is not a problem because you've let it test nearly as long as I let it test and don't have any errors.

If you take it in to have it repaired, it's probably going to be expensive. It's a whole lot cheaper to repair it yourself. It's not hard to remove the hard drive. If this is a laptop, consult your owner's manual for where the hard drive is located. If you don't have your manual, it is most likely on the manufacturer's website. It is held in by screws. Just unscrew the drive and pull it out.

If this is a desktop PC, it's a little bit more tricky but still not too hard (for me). The hard drive is located inside underneath your optical drives and floppy drive (if you have one). There are sometimes 2 screws on the right side securing it in place on the "rack." Sometimes there are 2 on each side making it hard to remove because the 2 screws on the left side are hard to get to. In that case you will need to remove the rack that the drive is sitting in from the case. Look for screws that may hold the rack in. Those are usually not hard to find but may take a few minutes of looking. After you get the rack out, remove the drive then put in and screw in the new one, fit the rack back in place and then connect your cables. If the drive is an IDE drive, there will be one wide "ribbon" cable as well as the power connector. Connect the ribbon cable so that the stripe (sometimes it's a red stripe, sometimes blue or black) is going down the right side of the cable. The power connector is keyed so it will only go in 1 way. If the drive is a SATA disk, both the data and power cables are keyed so they will only go in 1 way.

You will need to reinstall your operating system after replacing the drive. Hopefully any important files that you may have are backed up.

By the way, is this a laptop or a desktop? If this is a laptop, and your laptop run usually cool, I can pretty much bet that overheating isn't a factor, but I can't rule that out.

WinSimple Software


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#27
July 10, 2008 at 12:42:53

There is little doubt in my mind that this is a hard drive problem. I did finally break down and take my machine in to be repaired.

The repair guy and I used some software that I don't know the name of (nice, huh? lol) to scan the hard drive. It found and recovered 245 bad sectors. For the first time in a week, the computer actually booted up. When I tried to log into my account however, we arrived back at the black screen. This time though, the cursor appeared and I could move it - Jayrock reported the same thing so I suspect he or she only had one account on their computer.

We scanned the hard drive again... this time it found that almost every sector was bad.

Now, I'm back to where I started - if not worse. This looks bad...


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#28
July 10, 2008 at 12:56:17

Yep that's definitely a hard drive problem. A new hard drive will fix it.

WinSimple Software


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