Windows Media Player Error 80040256

March 29, 2007 at 11:29:33
Specs: Windows 98 SE, GenuineIntel x86/128MB
I'll try to outline the problem and give as much information as I can.
I don't have much experience with these issues.
I did get some advice on this and I'd like to get a second opinion to make sure it's good advice.

Basically, the problem is that my Windows Media Player won't play a .wav audio stream that's needed for a video game.
The first error I got stated that the msdxm.ocx file was missing, and the Windows Media Player didn't work at all.
(The file was probably deleted as the result of a spyware infection a year or so ago.
I didn't need Windows Media Player for anything so I didn't much care at the time.)

I replaced the missing msdxm.ocx file back into its proper location (c:\windows\system) and the Windows Media Player is now partially fixed.
However, it will still not play a .wav file needed for the video game.
The Windows Media Player will play .rmi files but not .wav files.
The Windows Media Player gives an error code 80040256 which says:
"cannot play back audio stream-no hardware or hardware not responding."

The Microsoft site gives the following:
CAUSE
This issue may occur if either of the following conditions is true:
• Your computer does not have a sound card, or your sound card is not working correctly.
• Another program is currently using your sound card, so it is not available for Windows Media Player to use.
Note This cause is specific to Microsoft Windows NT-based or Microsoft Windows 95-based computers.
• The hardware acceleration is set to too high.

I can manually play the .wav files if I use Start-Programs-Access-Entertainment-Sound Recorder to test the .wav files. The sound card seems to be working.
I shut down all other windows before trying to play a .wav file, but that didn't help.
The hardware acceleration is set at full but cannot be changed.
It won't set to a lower level even after pressing the apply and ok keys.
It just resets itself back to the way it was.
The other computer(also Win 98 SE) is set at full and works fine on .wav files.
The Media Windows Player plays them with no problem.

As I said earlier, I had to copy the msdxm.ocx file from the other computer over to this one because it was missing. (Both have version 6.4.07.1124 on them) Perhaps there's something else missing that I'm not aware of.
I don't use Windows Media Player for anything, but that seems to be the default for playing .wav.files, at least on this computer.
The other computer has a default play that uses ATI Multimedia File Player, not Windows Media Player.
If I could play those game sound files with another player that would interface with the video game, I could bypass the Windows Media Player problem, but I don't know if that can be done.
I have Windows Media Player version 6.4.07.1124, which I believe came with Windows 98 SE, but I couldn't locate it on the Windows 98 SE cd. If I could reinstall it, maybe that would fix the problem.
I was able to find and download Windows Media Player 6.4 but it doesn't say which exact version it is. I could do an install of 6.4 and see what happens but I don't want to cause more problems. I downloaded Windows Media Player 9 for Win 98 SE and thought about installing it over the older version(6.4.07.1124) currently on the computer, but decided to wait until I had more information about the problem. What's the best way to proceed in this situation?

This was the advice I was given:
Download the latest driver from the manufacturer,re-install the sound card drivers and the installation of Windows Media Player.
Do the drivers first, then a full restart, then WMP, then a full restart.

Some additional info:
I went to Start-Control Panel-Multimedia -Devices-Audio devices, and it says my audio driver is CMI18738/C3DX PCI Audio. I do have a 3.5 diskette labeled ESS PCI Sound Drivers that came with the computer.
I also clicked Control Panel-System-Device Manager-Sound +video, and it shows the same PCI driver and when I click on Properties, it says “this device is working properly”.
When I click Control Panel-Add/Remove programs, PCI Audio Driver does show up as an installed component.

The version of Media Windows Player on the computer is 6.4.07.1124, which I believe came with Windows 98 SE.
I tried to browse the Win 98 SE cd but couldn’t find anything that looked like Windows Media Player.
I recall reading somewhere that Windows Media Player was part of the Win 98 SE package.
It may be on the CD but I didn’t recognize it or know specifically where to look.
I did download Windows Media Player 6.4 from the internet in case I need it.
There are several versions of 6.4, but there was only a generic 6.4 to download.
I suppose it would be safest to try to reinstall version 6.4.07.1124 if it does exist on the Win 98 SE cd.
I don’t even use Windows Media Player for anything, but it’s the default to play .wav files that are used with a video game.
(I did do a My Computer-View-Folder Options-File types-wav sound, and it does open with mplayer2, so Windows Media Player is the default to play wav audio files.)

Also, when I copied the missing MSDXM.OCX file back into c:\Windows\System, I didn’t register it. I was looking at some help forums and saw something about having to register a missing file that had been replaced. I think it involved typing Start-Run-Regsvr32. I didn’t know what that meant but if it was a required step, I didn’t do it.
Over time, I’ve also used Microsoft update to download various patches that Microsoft issued.
I don’t remember if any of them involved Windows Media Player, but if they did, could this cause any problems if I tried to reinstall Windows Media Player?

This is where I'm at now:
I've downloaded the latest PCI audio driver(CMI8738) from CMI for Win 98, and unzipped the folder file.
I opened the folder file and found a setup.exe file. I haven't done anything with it yet.

I have no idea how to load Windows Media Player version 6.4.07.1124.
If it's on the Win 98 SE cd, I don't know how to locate it.
Since I don't use Windows Media Player, I don't want to load version 9, which takes up more much space than version 6.4.07.1124.
I also don't know if installing version 9 over version 6.4.07.1124 would fix the problem or create more problems.
I was only able to find and download a generic version 6.4 of Windows Media Player. I haven't done anything with it yet.

Primarily, I just want to be able to play the .wav audio files used in a video game.
I don't need an elaborate Windows Media Player, but it's the default player for .wav files on this computer.
All I want to do is to get this basic .wav playing function fixed.

I hope I've provided a decent outline of the situation.
Is the best approach to re-install an updated audio driver and to then re-install the generic version of Windows Media Player 6.4? If so, would I need to un-stall anything first or does everything just overwrite? Would I need to get Microsoft update patches again?
The last thing I want to do is go through all this and end up not fixing the problem and creating new ones.




See More: Windows Media Player Error 80040256

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#1
March 29, 2007 at 12:58:21
I've only skimmed this post so far but I have a couple of points:

1. Have you tried opening a .wav file on your current media player (rather than Sound Recorder) and if so does it work?

2. It is important that file versions used in replacements match the media player otherwise you might get unexpected results. CD file versions sometimes only apply if the media player has never been updated.

I'll power-up my W98SE later and see if I can make sense of the file/media player versions (I'm on XP right now).

DerekW


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#2
March 29, 2007 at 14:02:44
I can now answer some of your questions.

What you have is Windows Media Player 2 which is version 6.4.07.1124 (and the file msdxm.ocx should cary the same version number - not always the case with software).

As far as I can tell WMP2 is installed with Windows and there is no uninstall/install feature. The msdxm.ocx file version on the W98SE CD is 6.01.05.0217 and if this also matches the WMP2 number then presumably there have been some updates.

So, as your msdxm.ocx file version is correct then you can try registering it if you wish (not usually necessary). You type this in the Run box:

regsrvr32 c:\windows\system\msdxm.ocx

Note the single space just after 32. It will either say it has done it or it can't.

It seems very hard to believe that WMP issues have any bearing on why you cannot move the slider on hardware acceleration, which relates to graphics card/driver. You could go to Device Manager and remove the display card entry and reboot I suppose. Windows should then set it up again for you.

Are there are no errors showing anywhere in Device Manager?

My "guess" is that the wav file you are trying to play is too new for WMP2 and much of the other stuff (apart from the file that was missing) is an aside. I've run into this sort of thing many times.

DerekW


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#3
March 29, 2007 at 14:12:37
Here's another thought. Put all I've said on ice as this was trying to answer all of your questions.

If your WMP2 is able to play .wav files you already have on your machine, then Google for Media Player Classic. This is free, small, and up to date. See if this fixes your audio stream. It is a very neat player and will not overwrite WMP2.

Once in installed you will have to go to View/Options/Formats and put a tick in "Audio File". This player can easily be uninstalled if it doesn't help but I would first untick any formats you've added.

DerekW


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Related Solutions

#4
March 29, 2007 at 15:04:17
Heh... not another poster being paid by the word?

So... shopping this question around it would seem

I would submit to you the mini-skirt approach

I'm not one of those who think Bill Gates is the devil. I simply suspect that if Microsoft ever met up with the devil, it wouldn't need an interpreter.


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#5
March 29, 2007 at 19:53:38
Thanks for responding Derek.
I’ll try to give you some answers to your questions in the order they appeared:

1. Have you tried opening a .wav file on your current media player (rather than Sound Recorder) and if so does it work?

***My current media player is Windows Media Player and I get error 80040256 when I try to open any .wav file. I went to My Computer-View-Folder Options-File types-wav sound, and it does open with mplayer2, so Windows Media Player is the default to play .wav audio files. The Windows startup sounds, error sounds, dings, etc, all work so they must use a different default.

2. It is important that file versions used in replacements match the media player otherwise you might get unexpected results. CD file versions sometimes only apply if the media player has never been updated.

***That’s what I’m very concerned about. If a conflict occurs, I could end up causing more problems.
I don’t want to end up with no sound at all. The Windows function CD player and basic Windows sounds all seem to work. Apparently they use a default other than WMP. I need a few of the basic Windows sounds for another program. It uses the ding sound and is working fine at this time.

What you have is Windows Media Player 2 which is version 6.4.07.1124 (and the file msdxm.ocx should cary the same version number - not always the case with software).
As far as I can tell WMP2 is installed with Windows and there is no uninstall/install feature.

***Yes, this is exactly what I have and I couldn’t find any un-install feature at all.

The msdxm.ocx file version on the W98SE CD is 6.01.05.0217 and if this also matches the WMP2 number then presumably there have been some updates.
So, as your msdxm.ocx file version is correct then you can try registering it if you wish (not usually necessary).

***I have a backup computer that also runs Win 98 SE, with the same version of WMP, and that’s where I got the msdxm.ocx file from to replace the missing file in this computer.

You type this in the Run box:
regsrvr32 c:\windows\system\msdxm.ocx
Note the single space just after 32. It will either say it has done it or it can't.

***Ok, I just typed that in the Run box and it gave me an error message that says:
“Cannot find the file “regsrvr32” or one of its components”

It seems very hard to believe that WMP issues have any bearing on why you cannot move the slider on hardware acceleration, which relates to graphics card/driver. You could go to Device Manager and remove the display card entry and reboot I suppose. Windows should then set it up again for you.
Are there are no errors showing anywhere in Device Manager?

***I went to Control panel-System-Device Manager-Sound controllers, opened that branch and clicked Properties for the CMI8738/C3DX PCI Audio Device and it says “This device is working properly”.
The other computer is also set a full acceleration and Windows Media Player plays the .wav files.
I don’t know why the slider doesn’t hold a setting but the other computer Windows Media Player works with acceleration set at full.

My "guess" is that the wav file you are trying to play is too new for WMP2 and much of the other stuff (apart from the file that was missing) is an aside. I've run into this sort of thing many times.

***None of the .wav files work with WMP. No matter what .wav file I try, I get the same error.
It will play .rmi files. I went to the c:\windows\media file and clicked on various items.
WMP is the default for these Media sounds and the .rmi sounds will play, but the .wav sounds will not.
That’s where I get the error 80042056.

If your WMP2 is able to play .wav files you already have on your machine, then Google for Media Player Classic. This is free, small, and up to date. See if this fixes your audio stream. It is a very neat player and will not overwrite WMP2.
Once in installed you will have to go to View/Options/Formats and put a tick in "Audio File". This player can easily be uninstalled if it doesn't help but I would first untick any formats you've added.

***I had this thought, if I could download a small audio file player, and find a way to reset the default from WMP to this other audio player, that might get the sounds working.
It would bypass WMP altogether and since I don’t use it for anything, I wouldn’t care much to just leave it as it is, not trying to re-install drivers or WMP.
If I go to My Computer-View-Folder Options-File Types and then click on Wave Sounds, it shows mplayer2 as the default. If I could change that default to another audio file player, that might solve the problem. However, I don’t know how to change it, even if I had another audio file player.

Regarding the sound driver I downloaded, I assume the setup.exe file in the folder will walk me through the re-install process. I don’t know if I’d have to un-install anything regarding the driver. It should be pretty much an automatic operation followed by a reboot.
Then I’d have to re-install WMP, but what version?
I downloaded WMP 6.4 but I have no idea what specific version it is. I cannot find WMP version 6.4.07.1124 on the Win 98 SE cd. If I try to do a re-install using the “generic” 6.4 will that work or cause more problems? As you mentioned before, that might cause problems.
Will the Windows updates patches that I’ve downloaded from Microsoft still be active or would a re-install of WMP 6.4 cause conflicts? I have no idea.
Microsoft also has a security “patch” for WMP 6.4 that I also downloaded called “wm320920_64.exe”.
I have no idea if it was part of the Microsoft security updates I’ve downloaded before.
I downloaded it in case it was needed, but since I don’t use WMP online, I don’t think it should be needed.
Sorry for the long reply but I wanted to give you as much info as possible.


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#6
March 30, 2007 at 10:29:34
In what follows I am assuming that Media Player 2 (version 6.4.07.1124) is your only player and that when you say "Windows Media Player" this is what you mean. If this is not the case let me know.

"All" files with the extension .wav will open with just one player when double clicked and there is no question of some of these opening a different player. I'm therefore a bit confused about your response at item 1 and ask if this audio stream file has some other file extension?

It is not totally beyond possibility that your MP 6.4 security download will fix this problem but it is very unlikely.

Yes, setup.exe should install the sound driver although I am none too hopeful this will fix the problem either - but it might. The important thing is to be sure it is the correct driver otherwise it could make matters worse.

Otherwise, as Media Player 2 is an integral part of Windows install it could be tricky to fix this fault without the risk of disrupting Windows itself. The only easy option you have in this respect is to install your MP 6.4 download on top.

I suggested trying Media Player Classic because if this happens to get you out of trouble it would save you a lot of hassle. If not it can be uninstalled anyhow. It is an entirely separate program (very similar to MP 2) and will not cause any confliction. As already given it is very simple to set it to handle wave files temporarily "from within the program itself" - see my #3, last para.

DerekW


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#7
March 30, 2007 at 12:02:16
Hi Derek,

I am assuming that Media Player 2 (version 6.4.07.1124) is your only player and that when you mention "Windows Media Player" this is what you mean. I need to be quite clear about this otherwise the approach would need to be rather different.

***Yes, version 6.4.07.1124 is the only one on the computer.
I also did a search for “mplayer2” and found a zipped file in C:\windows\windows update setup files.
I suspect that the WMP that came with Win 98 SE was modified to some extent by a security patch that I had downloaded from Microsoft. I downloaded most of the patches that they issued.

"All" files with the extension .wav will open with just one player and there is no question of some of these opening with a different one. I'm rather confused about this and ask if this audio stream file has some other file extension?

***I still get sounds from Windows, such as startup sound, exit sound, dings, error sound, etc.
I can also manually play the sounds in Control Panel-Sounds(events-preview), and if I click on any of the icons like “critical stop”, it plays the chord. All of these icon sounds can be previewed and they all work .
Apparently these dings, chords, tada, etc sounds don’t use WMP as a default.
Maybe these aren’t wave files.
A chess program also uses the ding chord when it makes a move, and it still works.
If I go to C:\windows\media and open the file, there are .wav files like “chimes.wav.” and “chord.wav”.
If I click on any of these icons, it tries to play the file with WMP, and results in error 80042056.
None of the files in the media folder can be played because WMP is the default for playing them.
When I went to My Computer-View-Folder Options, it shows that .wav files open with mplayer2.
Apparently .wav files have a default of WMP.

It is not totally beyond possibility that your security download will fix this problem but it is unlikely.

***I think the security download was already done.

Yes, setup.exe should install the sound driver although I am none too hopeful this will fix the problem either - but it might. The important thing is to be sure it is the correct driver otherwise it could make matters worse.

***The manufacturer is C-Media and I went to their site and got the only PCI audio driver(release date Aug 2002) for Win 98 that they had. They only had the one driver for Win 98.
I think this computer was built in 2003 so it may be the exact same driver.
I unzipped the folder and it contains 15 files, including a setup.exe file.
My concern was that in clicking the setup.exe file, it may do things without any prompting for confirmation. There are other files in this folder such as mixer.exe which I already have that I don't want to reinstall.
I just want the driver reinstalled.
I haven't done anything yet and I agree that this probably won't fix the problem, but if it doesn't harm anything I can do it.

Otherwise, as Media Player 2 is an integral part of Windows install it could be tricky to fix this fault without the risk of disrupting Windows itself.

***Yes, that’s the last thing I want to do. I’d much rather live without WMP than mess up anything else.
I don’t use it anyway.

About the only option you have in this respect is to use the Media Player 6.4 download and simply install it again on top. It is for this reason that I suggested trying Media Player Classic because if this happens to get you out of trouble it would save you an awful lot of hassle.

***Yes, there is only one WMP 6.4 to download. There are no specific versions.
But maybe an overwrite would be good enough. There’s also a patch for WMP 6.4 but I suspect I’ve already got that on my system as part of the security downloads that I’ve done.
I might be able to reload 6.4 and then run a security update to be sure.
I don’t want to add any other versions such as 7.1 or 9, which are only going to take up space and cause more potential problems.
I’ll download Media Player Classic in the meantime.

If not it can be uninstalled anyhow.
MPC is an entirely seperate program (very similar to Media Player 2) and will not cause any confliction. As already given it is very simple to set it to handle wave files temporarily "from within the program itself", as given in the last para of my #3.

***You lost me here:
#3 If your WMP2 is able to play .wav files you already have on your machine, then Google for Media Player Classic. This is free, small, and up to date. See if this fixes your audio stream. It is a very neat player and will not overwrite WMP2.
Once in installed you will have to go to View/Options/Formats and put a tick in "Audio File". This player can easily be uninstalled if it doesn't help but I would first untick any formats you've added.

My WMP can’t play any .wav files. I don’t see View/Options/Formats as a path to look at.
I see View/Folder Options/ but no Formats path.
By the way, I appreciate your time with this problem.


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#8
March 30, 2007 at 12:13:35
Aha, I see. When you use Windows sounds it does use your current media player but does not display it (you wouldn't want it popping up each time).

What you have proved therefore is that this error arises with all .wav files but doesn't seem to prevent Windows sounds functioning. It also hides the error message for Windows sounds in the same way as does for the player. I guess it makes some sort of sense.

DerekW


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#9
March 30, 2007 at 13:01:44
Jumping the gun, if MPC does not fix the problem then the next step is to install that audio driver. This post sounds promising:
http://hardware.mcse.ms/printthread...

Error messages are often generic and don't necessarily mean exactly what they say (only that "something" is wrong).

DerekW


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#10
March 30, 2007 at 14:10:35
.... I seem to have lost a chunk out of one of my replies to you:

In my #3 and last para of #6 I was referring to making the Audio file setting from within "Media Player Classic itself" after you had downloaded it. Hope that is clear now.

DerekW


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#11
March 30, 2007 at 21:09:06
From #8
What you have proved therefore is that this error arises with all .wav files but doesn't seem to prevent Windows sounds functioning. It also hides the error message for Windows sounds in the same way as does for the player. I guess it makes some sort of sense.

***Well, it confuses me how I can get Windows sounds to preview using the Control Panel-Sounds-Event Preview function. The only conclusion I can reach is that the icons in the Sounds section are not .wav files, even though it’s the same audio sound.
They work because they’re not .wav files. In fact, I don’t see any file extension on these sounds at all.
When I look at the list of Sound Events in the Sounds section(found in Control Panel) it shows a whole list of common Microsoft sound icons such as “Critical Stop”.
When I clicked details for that icon it tells me this:
Name: Ding
It doesn’t show anything about it being a .wav file. No extension is given , it’s just “Ding”.
Opening the file C:\windows\media gives a whole display of sound icons but most of them are specifically designated as .wav files. For example, the icon for the “Ding” sound is called “Ding.wav Wave Sound”.
My WMP will play the 9 .rmi files that are in c:\windows\media but none of the .wav files.
If I click on the .rmi files, they play on WMP, but if I click on any of the .wav files, I get the 80040256 error. It appears that WMP works for some things but not others.

I did download Media Player Classic, and I think I now understand what you’re saying.
I didn’t read your response #6 carefully enough.
I can set the audio .wav file play default to Media Player Classic using the command contained in the Media Player Classic “program” that switches the default.

One more question, this was from your response #3
“If your WMP2 is able to play .wav files you already have on your machine, then Google for Media Player Classic. This is free, small, and up to date. See if this fixes your audio stream. It is a very neat player and will not overwrite WMP2.”

If my WMP can’t play any .wav files, does that rule out trying MPC or could MPC work regardless of that because it’s a separate program? If I understand you correctly, it’s worth trying even if WMP can’t play any .wav files because it bypasses WMP, and shouldn’t cause any further problems.

Thanks for all the information and time. I’m going to take a little time to digest all of this.
I’m inclined to try installing MPC first, and if that fails, then try a driver reinstall, and then an overwrite of WMP 6.4.
I’ll post the results once I’ve made a decision and acted on it.


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#12
March 31, 2007 at 10:03:03
Windows sounds are definitely .wav files. It's simply that in doesn't bother you with the file extension information in that panel - just the name. MS think that is all you need to know.

The only certain way you can establish file extensions for these (or any other files) is by finding them in "Windows Explorer" or "My Computer". They will also show if you use Find/Files or Folders. Try searching for ding.wav for example.

Even then some file extensions are hidden from you. I think it is far better to see them so, if you wish to, go to Start button/Folder Options/View and untick "Hide file extensions for known file types". It can save some confusion and also helps folk understand file extensions which is a good idea. It might already be unticked.

It is worth trying MPC anyway because that will tell us whether this is a Media Player issue or something else (such as the sound driver).

The only reason I mentioned your ability to play existing files was because at that time I wondered if it was some newer .wav file which was causing the problem. It is something I've run into for various sound and video file types. They get updated and the older players can't handle them.

My current feeling is that your problem is either your media player or sound card driver. MPC is the safest thing to try and can always be uninstalled. Beyond those two, things start getting more complicated.

DerekW


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#13
March 31, 2007 at 19:33:09
You're right about the wav files.
Last night I was able to find another Win 98 SE user with just about the same problem I have. (WMP problem, frozen setting, errors when playing .wav files, same card CMI8738)
I decided to take a look at the forum on the C-Media site where I downloaded the sound driver from.
As I was going through the older threads, this jumped out at me, although a good bit of it is way over my head.
Excerpt:
User:
I am using a CMI8738 sound card with my Windows 98SE. A few months ago it worked just fine, but now there isn't any sound, my volume button can't be found, the multimedia(control panel) shows only the devices, but I can't change anything. And my Windows Media Player 9.0 says that the sound card is either not installed or corrupted. I have uninstalled everything and the computer recognizes the sound card when I reboot. Plus, I have downloaded the driver from this website, which doesn't fix it.

Helper:
Try uninstalling your drivers then reinstalling them, making sure you use drivers for win98.

User:
I have uninstalled and reinstalled the drivers, using different driver downloads, and so far it still isn't working. But now I have noticed that even though I download a new driver the hardware wizard continues to say that I have the best driver already installed.

Helper:
Try typing in dxdiag in the run box, or go to programs/accessories/system tools - then pick "system Information", then when the info comes up go to tools/directx diagnostic, then go to the "sound" tab and run the tests. See what you get.
What I would do is do exactly what I said but this time uninstall the drivers - then directly boot the PC down and physically take the PCI sound card out of the PC (if you don't know how to work in your case get someone who will help you). Then boot up without the sound card so that the OS does not know it's there. Boot back down and install the PCI card, new hardware found wizard will come up when you boot back up with the card in the PC cancel out of that twice, then install the drivers. Be sure you install the PCI card firmly to make sure it's in there good but not so hard as to damage anything. You might even try another PCI slot other than the one it was in. It sounds like it stopped being completely recognized. However there is also a possibility that you have a corrupted operating system or conflict. There are tools for 98SE to take it back to the working state it was in (registry wise) with the dos command scanreg /fix or scanreg /w (then pick a date to restore it to. Do some research in it if all other methods fail. If it is the OS you can always reformat your system if you are comfortable with that (but it is a last resort usually).

User:
Finally, success at last! How did it happen? I physically removed the CMI8738 sound card from my computer, and started it up. Then I made sure the card was removed from the device manager, before I shut the computer down. Next I physically reinstalled the CMI8378 sound card and started up my computer again. Windows recognized the sound card, but I canceled the Hardware Wizard, so the "old" driver did not become installed. Now find the "new" driver you downloaded from C-Media and click setup. The "new" driver will be downloaded and ready for installation when you update it later. Reboot your computer and allow the hardware wizard to do its thing. If it asks for the Windows 98 setup disk, type or browse the file/folder where the "new" driver was placed and enter that location instead. Reboot your computer once more and cross your fingers, it really should work! It did for me.(end)
http://www.cmedia.com.tw/forums/vie...

I ran a start-programs-accessories-system info-tools-directX diagnostic tool-sound-test direct sound and it failed with the following error:
"Failure at step 3(Direct Sound Create) Hresult=0x8007057 invalid argument"

Device name: C-Media wave device
Driver name: CMAUDIO.SYS

It looks to me like the sound driver is a likely source of trouble for me too.
I didn't see any instructions that came with the download, it has 15 files with a setup.exe in it. I didn't see any driver installation instructions at the site either.
It doesn't appear that an overwrite reinstall will help much, but I'm in over my head at this point.
I may have to e-mail them if I want to get specific instructions on what to do.
If an uninstall is involved, wouldn't that run the risk of killing all sounds if it can't be reinstalled correctly?
All of this isn't seeming to be worth it just to get .wav files playing for a video game. Playing .wav files isn't critical, but losing all the basic sounds that still work would be. Anyway, I thought you might find the forum thread interesting.


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#14
March 31, 2007 at 19:54:49
At the end of the day the decision is yours.

If you wish to continue then there is no harm trying MPC (quick and easy to install). If it doesn't help it would take the media player of the equation and put sound card issues at the top of the list.

In which case you could uninstall MPC and just try the sound driver as already discussed.

Otherwise, althought it's not absolutely certain that your problem is identical, it looks quite likely. In which case you obviously need to follow the procedure from "user" that gave the fix.

Gotta nip off now, I'm in the UK and it's waaaay past bedtime (nearer breakfast time LOL).

DerekW


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