Solved 3.5 drive does not recognize (FAT) formatted disk text file

December 22, 2012 at 18:32:34
Specs: Windows 7

Read 3.5" floppy txt files (FAT) on Windows 7 NTFS

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✔ Best Answer
December 24, 2012 at 10:28:09

"As far as old 3.5" drive misalignment, it is still reading all my old 3.5" disks."
The read head is the same as the write head so that is why it can still read the disks it's writing, even though the track is slightly offset.

1. yes, mailing the files would be an easy way.

2. The problem is not how old the floppies are, the problem is the heads from your old drive are out of alignment and not matching up with the heads in the new drive. This won't work. You are still writing to the floppies using your old drive, it doesn't matter if the floppies are new or old.

3. Yes, you can transfer data over a serial cable.

4. It's not the problem with the computer, it's the fact that the heads are misaligned. Installing a new drive in an old computer isn't going to work. If your new USB drive can't read the floppy, then another new drive isn't going to able to read them either.

If I may also offer a bit of advice, floppy disks are very unreliable as you are experiencing, and they are a dying format. You should not continue writing your valuable data to new ones. Once you retrieve the data, I would highly suggest storing in on your hard drive as well as making a backup copy on CD or DVD.



#1
December 22, 2012 at 18:52:23

A floppy drive uses a FAT12 file system but it has nothing to do with being read on a operating system running on and NTFS file system.

What problems are you experiencing? If the drive isn't reading the floppy disk, most likely the heads on the drive on your current computer are out of alignment with the heads on the drive you wrote the text file on.


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#2
December 23, 2012 at 06:13:01

Thank you for responding, here's a little more information. The external 3.5" floppy drive (USB portable diskette drive) works fine on my newer laptop (Samsung, Windows 7) with recently created files. The older files that were created on a 486-50 computer (Windows 95) works fine on that computer. When I try to read the old files/floppy on my new drive I get the error messages. Somewhere, I recall reading that there is a conversion routine that will enable me to convert FAT32 to NTFS.
Thank you for responding

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#3
December 23, 2012 at 08:32:50

Again, FAT32 (which your aren't using, floppies are FAT12) and NTFS have absolutely nothing to do with this. The conversion you are talking about is how to convert your hard drive from FAT to NTFS. The file system on your floppy disks are, and will always remain FAT12. Even the floppy disks you are creating with Windows 7 are using FAT12.

Floppy disk drives are notorious for having the heads go out of alignment. The is your problem, the heads on your old system have gone out of alignment and your new portable disk drive can't read the tracks.

Your best bet would be to check if the motherboard in your new computer has the connections for hooking up the floppy drive via a ribbon cable. If so, pull the drive out of your old computer and put it in your new one. Then you can read the floppies that you created on your 486. Copy the files to your hard drive, then copy them back to a floppy disk using your portable USB drive. Now you will be able to read them.


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Related Solutions

#4
December 23, 2012 at 11:39:38

Here's your conversion from NTFS to FAT.
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/...
Basically open Command Prompt (run as administrator) and type:
convert drive letter here: /fs:ntfs
eg: convert D: /fs:ntfs

I don't know if it will work on floppys.
You might be able to copy the files onto the hard drive of the Windows 95 computer and copy them onto memory pen from that, then open the memory pen on the laptop.


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#5
December 23, 2012 at 18:35:26

You cannot convert a floppy to the NTFS files system, and it would t matter anyway because, for the third time, that is not the issue.

Also, a USB pen drive won't work on Windows 95 because Windows 95 doesn't support USB.


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#6
December 24, 2012 at 09:21:18

Thanks for your 2nd response. I don't think that I could install my old 3.5" floppy drive in my new computer since it is a Samsung laptop (small). I have built computers in the past but never laptops. As far as old 3.5" drive misalignment, it is still reading all my old 3.5" disks.
4 thoughts, please tell me what you think:
1. Mail the files from the 486 to my laptop
2. If floppies are all FAT12, could I place my new floppies in the old 3.5 drive and copy them from my 5.25" high density B drive to the new floppies and then read the new 3.5 floppies on my external 3.5 drive attached to my laptop?
3. Directly connect my laptop to my 486 via serial port and transfer that way?
4. Install a new 3.5" FDD in my old computer and then transfer?
BTW, my 486 Micronics motherboard has a bad backup battery and I have lost my CMOS configure files. I have to go to setup and add hard disk parameters that I have since forgotten. So no hard drive activity on my 486 at this point.
I wouldn't be pursuing this if it weren't important with need for access to old files.
Thanks
K2RR

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#7
December 24, 2012 at 10:28:09
✔ Best Answer

"As far as old 3.5" drive misalignment, it is still reading all my old 3.5" disks."
The read head is the same as the write head so that is why it can still read the disks it's writing, even though the track is slightly offset.

1. yes, mailing the files would be an easy way.

2. The problem is not how old the floppies are, the problem is the heads from your old drive are out of alignment and not matching up with the heads in the new drive. This won't work. You are still writing to the floppies using your old drive, it doesn't matter if the floppies are new or old.

3. Yes, you can transfer data over a serial cable.

4. It's not the problem with the computer, it's the fact that the heads are misaligned. Installing a new drive in an old computer isn't going to work. If your new USB drive can't read the floppy, then another new drive isn't going to able to read them either.

If I may also offer a bit of advice, floppy disks are very unreliable as you are experiencing, and they are a dying format. You should not continue writing your valuable data to new ones. Once you retrieve the data, I would highly suggest storing in on your hard drive as well as making a backup copy on CD or DVD.


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#8
December 24, 2012 at 16:14:59

Thanks once again for your sage advice. Problem solved. This is going to sound ridiculous but here goes. I found a 3.5" floppy that can be read by both the old and new drives. I transferred files from my old 5.25" high density drive onto that floppy and then from the 3.5" inserted in a Windows XP machine transferred those files to a thumb zip. From the thumb zip transferred them to my Windows 7 laptop. I can now manipulate and read the 10+ year old files. To be honest, I am not sure why it worked. Don't know why one newly formatted floppy should work in both new and old drives.

Now I am back to resurrecting my old hard drives in the 486-50 computer. I need a program (stored on the 486 computer) that converted my files from ASCII to PFS format and viceversa. This problem is related to the CMOS backup battery corroding and destroying several lands/layers on my Micronics EISA 7 layer motherboard. I will plug in a new battery and try to discover the settings for my two hard drives (maybe type 2 and 47). I used an Ultrastor controller for the second drive.

Enuff, thank you very much for taking the time to respond.
Have a terrific holiday and a good year to us all.
k2rr


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#9
December 24, 2012 at 17:15:50

As long as the computer is plugged in, you don't need a battery to hold the settings.

This program you need, is it already installed, or is it the installer file? The reason I ask is you could get an IDE to USB cable like this - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ... and connect your old drive to your laptop and get the program from there. Some old programs will run without having to install them so you could try that as well.

Anyway, glad to hear you got your files you needed.


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