Installing a new server

Ibm X3550 m3 1u rack mountable server
July 29, 2012 at 23:23:49
Specs: Windows 2008 R2
Hi friends,
I own two servers, the first one is an HP old server and second one is IBM's x3550.
now, I have got few programs installed on the original server (HP) and all I want is to duplicate that server to another one, from the HP server to IBM.
I have already tried to make a fresh installation, but apparently it won't work of some reason I really don't know, maybe I didn't config correctly part of the settings, so it looks like a mess.
That's why I tried to make an Image from the HP server and tried to install it on the x3550.
But after I did so, the server won't start the OS, however it gets into a loop of restarts (tried to get into safemode but it doesn't allow me).
And here is the point where I ask your help.
Thanks in advanced!

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#1
July 29, 2012 at 23:31:14
You can't just take the image from one manufacturer's hardware and install it on a new server.

IBM servers come with a CD that you use to install OSs (at least they always used to) which will install all the necessary drivers. Use that to install the OS rather than trying to do it directly from the Microsoft disk.

You need to address the problem of installing the OS from scratch. Call IBM support if necessary; they know all the answers.


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#2
July 29, 2012 at 23:34:14
thanks for answer,
the problem in installing a fresh OS as I said is that I don't know all the configurations for the OS and its programs (as was on the Original HP server).
that's why I wanted to duplicate...

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#3
July 30, 2012 at 08:57:06
This is clearly something you can not do yourself. Time to bring in someone who can.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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Related Solutions

#4
July 30, 2012 at 09:14:17
I agree. Your problem is not that you don't know how to move the OS and applications to a new server but that you don't even know how you would recover your current server in case of a disaster. You need to address this before worrying about moving to new hardware.

If the applications running on this server are important to your organization then you have a huge potential problem. You need to have a documented disaster recovery process to allow you, or anyone else, to bring the server back online, on new equipment if necessary. It will cost you to get a consultant to do this for you, but what will it cost your company if this server fails?


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#5
July 30, 2012 at 13:23:34
I've been here before, and I found no documentation on how to address it, but I figured it out on my own. Here's what I did. This used to be a little simpler on WIndows 2003, but they don't let you install plug-and-play hardware on Windows 2008 manually, you have to insert the device (Except by following the instructions below)

On the old server, I installed Microsoft's iSCSI initiator driver. Once installed, I "updated" the driver to be that of the new storage controller, in your case, the controller of the IBM server. I rebooted and then shutdown and took an offline image of the server. I restored it to my new server and corrected the other driver and licensing issues. Do this at your own risk, because it's a huge waste of time if you don't do it right. Good luck.

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
IT Support Maryland


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#6
July 30, 2012 at 13:33:52
That may have addressed the storage controller but certainly not the entire list of hardware in the registry. This would leave the server in a bloated condition destined for problems.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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#7
July 31, 2012 at 05:58:39
Wanderer, I think you're exaggerating it a little bit. Yes, it would leave some drivers on the boot start list, but it wouldn't be "bloated" and "destined for problems." I have to deal with a lot of companies that don't have the budget to do a full proper migration to a new server and have done this procedure several times with Windows 2003 and Windows 2008 and the servers have gone on for years without issues, with regular maintenance, of course. I won't disagree with you on the point that it's better for mrbond to reinstall all of the programs on the new server that has a freshly installed OS, but I don't think my suggestion is disastrous either.

--
Andrew Leonard
BL Technical Services
IT Support Maryland


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#8
August 1, 2012 at 00:46:20
My objection to this solution is that it doesn't address the real problem. The OP doesn't know how to restore his server in case of a disaster and there is no documented procedure to allow someone else to do so, Your solution is a kludge that perpetuates this unsatisfactory state of affairs. It would be far better to bite the bullet and sort that situation out before thinking of migrating to new hardware.

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