Sharing a Mapped Drive

February 24, 2011 at 11:58:40
Specs: Windows Server 2003

I am running a server that is running out of storage drive and physical space. Adding a Network drive is easily accomplished. The main program on the server needs have the drive shared. I was able to find the MS fix for network drive time outs, but I can not find a way to share that drive.

It looks like Windows7 can do this, but I am running MS Server 2003 R2. An upgrade is not in the balance sheet totals.


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#1
February 24, 2011 at 12:01:41

Umm, right click the folder -> goto properties -> select the share tab and set the settings. Its the same as the way you would do it in Windows XP, Vista and 7. I am not sure what you are asking. Have you never shared a drive before?

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#2
February 24, 2011 at 13:38:23

Have you tried doing this with a mapped drive? It doesn't sound like it.

I have a mapped drive "J" to a freenas volume. I can copy to the folder, and delete from the "J" drive. I just need to share this drive for the software to work correctly.


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#3
February 24, 2011 at 13:57:03

nas volumes usually run on linux with no samba server. You should be able to share it but it won't be a domain share.

I don't see this working for a server based program requiring a local folder access. It would be very unusual for a program installed localling on the server to need a share since it has local access. The share is most likely for client access.

Good time to start thinking of cloning the existing server install to a larger drive.

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#4
February 24, 2011 at 14:42:52

"Have you tried doing this with a mapped drive?"

I am confused. Why would you want to share a Mapped Drive. All a Mapped Drive is a shared drive that is set to a specific drive letter. The drive is already shared or you would not be able to map it. Like Wanderer said it may be that they wanted you to map a drive letter for the client software because it might not be able to work with UNC pathing. Can you explain a little bit more of what you are trying to do?

As for the disk space problem, I agree with Wanderer's suggestion. Image your computer and install a lager drive.


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#5
February 24, 2011 at 15:09:22

The software running requires shares to pull images around the servers. It's old architecture, but I have to work with it, not against it. This freenas is my personal file server at work.

Budget constraints prevent me from upgrading any server class drives.

I guess I should just try it without sharing and cross my fingers.


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#6
February 25, 2011 at 01:20:14

Have you had a look at using DFS to consolidate all your shares?

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#7
February 25, 2011 at 04:46:52

The drive needs to be shared for sure. The system accesses the drive by \\<servername>\<drive letter>\IMG via command line.

That said, I can not just simply map a drive. I read somewhere that SAN's present virtual disks to a server so they can be shared. This would work, but I'm not sure I can with a NAS.


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#8
February 25, 2011 at 07:04:35

A nas is not a san
A san is attached to the server
A nas is not.

Can you create a share on the nas?
\\nas name\sharename?

Can you configure the program to access that share?
Of does the program want a drive letter?

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#9
February 25, 2011 at 07:35:22

I found my answer.

I used iSCSI protocol on my NAS software to create a local drive on the server. Microsoft has developed iSCSI support for Server 2003 and installed it. After about an hour of cursing, I got the server to find the new drive. I converted it to dynamic and formatted the drive. I was able to test send images and it wrote to the new "drive" perfectly. It's a tad slower then the locals, but that is expected. Honestly, I don't think they will notice.

The age of the hardware already made the system slow, so it really is not noticable to end users.


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#10
February 25, 2011 at 07:55:46

BTW, I was able to share it just like the software needs to do which was the original reason for the post.

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#11
February 25, 2011 at 13:05:06

Great job. I wouldn't have considered iscsi as a solution. Thanks for updating us.

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