Are there University certification after computer cert

January 7, 2013 at 06:23:07
Specs: Windows 7
I learnt that once you are Comptia A+ or CCNA certified there are United state Universities that you can enrol for a year or two computer programmes and end up earning BSC.

Please send your know-how on this particularly if you are a resident/student in United State or Canada.

Thanks.


See More: Are there University certification after computer cert

Report •


#1
January 7, 2013 at 07:51:39
While "distance education" is becoming the norm, many of the "online universities" are not accredited

If they're not....the certificat/diploma/degree won't be worth the paper it's printed on.

If you want a degree/diploma that's recognized it has to come from an accredited institution. If you check most job postings, or at least the ones for the better positions, they all say your degree/diploma has to be from an accredited institution. If it's not, and they will check, you're not going to even get called in for an interview unless you have a whole lot of verifiable experience.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#2
January 7, 2013 at 12:16:53
I should add.....

There may well be some accredited institutions that offer online Computer courses (I know of one for sure) but I highly doubt cert's like A+ or CCNA would have credit value toward a Computer Science degree. (BSc).

While CompTIA is widely ackknowledged by employers, I don't believe any accredited University would consider a CompTIA certification as a creditable course that could be carried over towards one, or more, courses in a Comp Sci degree.

I suspect the same will be true for Cisco certs. First of all, they're for a specific vendor (ie: Cisco) and second, no Comp Sci course I've ever heard of deals much with networking. If they did, it would be a very general course that likely wouldn't deal with things like managed switches and routers by brand.

In order for previous training to be considered, it would have to relate to the Comp Sci program.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#3
January 7, 2013 at 22:53:07
@ Curt R , thanks for your contributions. Though, most of your answers were not in line with my request such as contributors should come from United State/ Canada because these are the areas I learnt such is practised. At least before you can be certified in any of the two mentioned certification bodies you have to read and research almost round computer tech. To shield more light to your view on CCNA, before one can be CCNA certified you have to have at least average tech know-how on desktop windows installation and troubleshooting and server setup and configurations. Then followed by Cisco networking equipment setup and configuration.

I need response to this request urgently. I learnt its possible so far you have you O'level papers complete as a science student.

Thanks.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 8, 2013 at 07:45:55
The biggest issue we have here is a failure to communicate. It's obvious to me English is not your first language and you're also not understanding what I'm trying to tell you so I'll try one last time.

Before I say anything else I should tell you that I live in Canada and work for a University.

So I do know what I'm talking about. I work in IT and have for almost 20 years and I have more certifications than you can shake a stick at, as well as almost 20 years of experience in industry. I hold several CompTIA cert's, a couple Microsoft cert's, as well as cert's from Novell, HP/Compaq, IBM, Toshiba, Lexmark and others. I also have a two year diploma.

You do not need any kind of certifications, be they CompTIA, Cisco, HP, IBM or anybody elses to get into university.

You do however, have to have the educational requirements for whatever course you wish to get into. Most will require something like a valid grade 12 diploma with an 85% average at grades 11 and 12 level in things like Algebra, GeoTrig, Physics, Biology, etc Those requirements will differ from program to program and you can find that out by reading about the course you wish to take.

For instance, I've taken two UNIX courses through the university's Comp Sci program (I get them basically for free right) and I've check with our PLAR (prior learning assessment) people to see what, if any, of my previous education can be used to reduce the number of classes I would have to take in order to get my Comp Sci degree.

None of the cert's were of any value. The only courses that were, were the diploma courses. Which isn't a big deal to me because I'm no programmer and I know it and my chances of doing well on the programming aspect is low so I won't be pursuing my Comp Sci degree.

Now, this may have changed in the last 5 years...........that's how long ago I did the PLAR assessment, but I'd wager it's still the same with regard to using them towards reducing the course load.

To shield more light to your view on CCNA, before one can be CCNA certified you have to have at least average tech know-how on desktop windows installation and troubleshooting and server setup and configurations. Then followed by Cisco networking equipment setup and configuration.

Granted, I've never taken any Cisco training, but I find it hard to believe you need to know anthing about computers or operating systems in order to pass a CCNA exam (or exams, as the case may be). I've looked at a couple example CCNA exams online and there's nothing unrelated to Cisco on those exams. I think you're mistaken as to the requirements for a CCNA.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •


Ask Question