How do I boot XP on to my RAM?

March 21, 2009 at 13:59:25
Specs: Windows XP
Hi, I've recently tried out a distribution of linux called puppy or dingo 4.0 and I'm really impressed at how the 87mb OS boots from the CD and loads itself on to the RAM. and once you shut down you can burn your preferences a cdr, or copy to usb drive, and of course your hard drive.

Now this got me thinking, Can I achieve this type of configuration with Windows XP?

I want windows XP to boot from the CD or DVD, copy itself and all of the applications I would need on to the RAM. I think I could achieve this with my 2GB RAM...I might consider adding more if it is required.

The reason I am trying to have a ram based system is because I am an audio engineer, and I am trying to eliminate the excess noise from my PC and also I want the fast disk read/write access for sound recording. I do not require anything else aside from Cubase and my sound, video and any other required drivers, I don't even require the windows GUI, it would be great if my computer just loaded cubase and that's it. I would not be using this machine for internet access or anything else other than sound recording/editing.

Any ideas? How can I configure windows xp to boot from a CD and then once loaded it is running of the RAM?

Thanks + Cheers!


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#1
March 21, 2009 at 14:17:43
http://www.google.com/search?source...

-Ryan Adams
Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com

Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#2
March 21, 2009 at 16:52:14
You want bart PE. google search it.

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#3
March 21, 2009 at 20:32:18
or get the Gigabyte i-RAM, which I believe was created with
A/V enthusiasts in mind. It also has a battery that'll supposedly store your OS for 7hrs too; if you lose power or need to reboot.

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#4
March 25, 2009 at 13:10:00

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#5
March 26, 2009 at 17:24:35
Too bad it hasn't been updated in for ever and still costs 100+ without any memory.

-Ryan Adams
Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com

Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#6
March 26, 2009 at 19:16:26
If you're an audio or video editor this piece of hardware is priceless. The death of work progress is the sound of a ticking hard drive... I think it is reasonably priced for the age of the technology, and you wouldn't necesessarily require DD3 or even DD2 so you could save on the cost of RAM. A decent sata/scsi drive for this type of application wouldn't be that much cheaper. Disk based hard drives that have mechanically moving parts will always be slower than ram.
Lets say you were building an A/V workstation from the ground up with say a dual or quad core, gigabyte motherboard with the iram you'd still end up paying less than a mid range apple system or a decent model of a name brand pc.

So it depends on your specific needs. SSD hard drives may wipe out the i-ram company altogether because of it's more traditional use, but I would like to see more OS designers start building actual chips in to your motherboard that boots your OS rather than it seeking from the hard drive.

Look at QNX, they build the most efficient and stable OS on the planet...It's commonly used on the space shuttles. Anyway, this is the way I would like to see computers used: turn on the computer and the application is running instantaneously, no load up or anything just full performance from the components dedicated to that one specific application.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTUw...
qnx fastboot


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#7
March 26, 2009 at 19:46:27
I still must disagree. The latest version of the I-Ram supports a max of 4GB of RAM. Furthermore, if you read the manual for the device, using the I-Ram in a RAID 0 or RAID 1 with an ICH7R controller uses up to 1GB of space on the device. SO if you plan to keep your data mirrored for safety or if you are going to use multiple I-Rams to increase space, be prepared to waste lots of space.

Additionally, the I-Ram sells for about $130 today. NewEggs cheapest 1GB DDR 400 RAM is ~$30. Multiply that by four sticks and you'll be paying $120. In all, 4GB (or potentially 3GB, see above) of storage will cost you $250.

For that same price you could set up two 80GB 15,000RPM drives in a stripped RAID. Or get a 300GB VelociRaptor SATA drive. Atleast with those options, you don't have to worry about a power failure wiping your entire drive.

The I-Ram is a novel idea. I've toyed with the idea of getting one myself. It just doesn't make sense to use it in the way this tread is discussing.

-Ryan Adams
Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com

Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#8
March 27, 2009 at 12:10:26
thanks for your interest and replies. I know the down-side of iram or loading information on to ram in general is the loss of power, but this isn't a big issue if you have a power supply backup, you could just dump all of you necessary files on to your memory stick before it runs out of juice It's true it would be rather annoying to have to reinstall you OS and application every time, but if you're smart you can create a customized XP installation that only installs the bare requirements and drivers so it would only take about 15 minutes to reinstall. there's minwin and windows xp enhanced edition that are available on the torrent. They are cracked versions, so you'd have to enter you own key to make it legit for ms updates but it comes with sp3 and all of the recent updates and it's not really a big concern either because MS probably won't be improving xp any further.

anyway, I understand that it's not necessarily a professional option at this point but I still like to flirt with the dream of having a PC that never shows me progress bars, hourglass or hard drive ticking during my work sessions. this technology combined with SSD may be a step in the right direction for desktop computing...especially laptops.


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