GNU Public License

November 3, 2009 at 11:57:52
Specs: Windows Vista, 2 GHz DualCore/ 2041 MB
Hi I realize that this is probably not the best place for this question but I really don't know where else. I've been programming in c/c++ for a while using the GNU public library, and I realize now that I don't have any right to any of my work using their library. I was just wondering if this is correct, that if I would like to sell a program I can't use any of the GNU public libraries, not even as simple as the printf standard i/o functions. So I have to create absolutly everything myself?

Live the life as you know it
/ Wille


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#1
November 3, 2009 at 15:08:54
It's not quite that bad, but I'm not an expert on the GNU Public
License. I suggest you read it, top to bottom, to find out. What I
do know is there's a lot of misconceptions and false
assumptions around it.

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#2
November 3, 2009 at 15:15:37
A bit more info: I think what you've been told is not true. You can
sell your software, as explained here:

http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/selli...


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#3
November 3, 2009 at 15:33:38
Yep, definitely allowed to use GCC for proprietary software:

"the FSF decided long ago to allow developers to use GCC's
libraries to compile any program, regardless of its license"

http://www.fsf.org/licensing/licens...

Hope that helps.


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Related Solutions

#4
November 4, 2009 at 00:15:33
Thanks for that info. Though I have read the license agreement, I don't understand it fully. The sites you linked explains how the software can be free, even if you distribute it for a fee. Is it correct then that I can demand a fee for the programs I make but I have to give out the source code for it if someone would ask for it?

Live the life as you know it
/ Wille


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#5
November 4, 2009 at 02:10:13
No, if I have understood the terms of the runtime licence exception referred to in my previous post, you can use GCC to compile your program and distribute it under your own licence terms, whatever you wish them to be, including not allowing access to your source code.

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