Big development decisions

Dell INSPIRON
July 21, 2009 at 17:25:04
Specs: Windows XP, 2.0/4GB
I trying to write a program based on an Access db I have that manages my bank accounts and budget, but I need help choosing the
1) language (narrowed to Java, C++, or Python)
2) programming style (OO or procedural or functional)
and
3) gui

Here are the conditions I'm working with.
A) I have some bat scripting and VBA experience, and had a non-gui C++ class in college
B) I need to use development products with licenses that allow me the option to sell the program
C) Due to my lack of experience, my preference as of now is non-OO style, unless this is unwise
D) Due to my lack of experience, I think I need all the help I can get from a development environment
E) I'm looking for a really good looking gui, preferably not "Windows" looking. If possible I'd like to be able to choose the color pallet and fonts, etc. If possible, please tell me where to view screenshots for any suggestions?
F) From what I can tell, SQL Express or SQLite would be good, free back-ends, and have licenses that would allow me to sell the product
G) I'm not and don't anticipate ever working in a computer related field (so experience for experience's sake isn't a high priority)

I've been at this for a couple of weeks, but you might be able to tell by my post that I'm still not sure what all "parts" I'll need, or how they work together to help me get the program done.

Thanks for your help.


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#1
July 21, 2009 at 20:01:53
C) Due to my lack of experience, my preference as of now is non-OO style, unless this is unwise
Due to my lack of experience posting on computing.net, I will never post on Computing.net. Also, all three languages you specified are OO. Finally, you might want to look at C#, or one of the other .NET languages.

D) Due to my lack of experience, I think I need all the help I can get from a development environment
IDEs are nice tools, but they aren't crutches. After all, what use is a list of functions if you don't know what they do? Most of them cost, too. Visual Studio Express is one of the best C/C++ IDEs, but I don't think its license allows you to sell whatever it builds. The Pro version is $800, and that doesn't include an upgrade to VS 2010 (currently in Beta).

E) I'm looking for a really good looking gui, preferably not "Windows" looking. If possible I'd like to be able to choose the color pallet and fonts, etc. If possible, please tell me where to view screenshots for any suggestions?
With Java, I think you'll be stuck with the Java GUI. How robust its controls are, I don't know. With C++, you can make it look however you want, but GUI building will take the longest. I know Python has many GUI frameworks; perhaps one of them could work for you.

F) From what I can tell, SQL Express or SQLite would be good, free back-ends, and have licenses that would allow me to sell the product
SQLite is public domain; many countries, including the USA, do not legally recognize public domain. I doubt the authors of SQLite will ever sue, but it's an interesting bit of trivia, no?
Anyways, it's a moot point; you already said its DB backend would be Access. Also, I don't know what the commercial license of Access looks like, so you'll want to get with a lawyer before selling something Access backed.

G) I'm not and don't anticipate ever working in a computer related field (so experience for experience's sake isn't a high priority)
Prepare for much frustration, especially if you go the C++ route.


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#2
July 21, 2009 at 21:15:34
Thanks Razor.

Due to my lack of experience posting on computing.net, I will never post on Computing.net. Also, all three languages you specified are OO.
I don't understand the computing.net part. Also, I thought it was possible to program procedurally in those languages.

With Java, I think you'll be stuck with the Java GUI
Oh.

Anyways, it's a moot point; you already said its DB backend would be Access.
No, the model db I wrote is in Access, but I'll rewrite the data into a SQL back-end.

Prepare for much frustration, especially if you go the C++ route.
Thanks, I'll keep this in mind as I decide.


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#3
July 21, 2009 at 22:07:07
I don't understand the computing.net part.
It's an allegory. If your excuse for not doing something is not having experience doing it, you'll never accomplish anything.

Also, I thought it was possible to program procedurally in those languages.
Java forces OO. Python's GUI frameworks will probably be done as objects. Win32's C++ wrappers are objects. The .NET languages are built on OO.


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Related Solutions

#4
July 21, 2009 at 22:29:54
Excuse the ignorance, but what does it mean that Java forces OO? I won't be able to code procedurally to mimic the event-based mechanisms of my Access db?

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#5
July 21, 2009 at 22:57:04
Everything in Java is an object. There is no function outside of an object.

Additionally, VBA is OO, so I have no idea where you're coming from.


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#6
July 22, 2009 at 08:23:30
I do almost everything in Perl, but I had a couple projects where Perl would not meet the needs, so I chose to use REALbasic, which is an OO language.

REALbasic has a very good IDE and is cross platform, which means that the same code base can be compiled to run on Windows, Linux, and MAC.

http://www.realsoftware.com/realbasic/

Since you already have some VBA experience, you'll find realbasic very easy to learn.

I'd suggest getting the personal edition to try out and upgrade to the professional edition if you decide you like it.


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