work out % in simple excel

January 5, 2006 at 01:59:26
Specs: winxp, 1gb

Hi There,

I'm not very good with excel so bear with me.
I have a spreadsheet with a weight of 102.5 in cell A1, and in A2 i have a weight of 101, what i want to do is work out the percentage loss in cell B1 overall, so as i keep losing weight and entering my next weights as i go down the column, this figure in B1 will keep working out the percentage loss from when i first started (ie 102.5)

any help woulb be great


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#1
January 5, 2006 at 07:08:44

Your starting reference is A1. If B1 is the percentage gain(loss) overall then it has to reference the most recent weight. The layout is awkwark if you have B1 dependent on the last entry.

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#2
January 5, 2006 at 07:49:47

they are not specific cells, just used as an example.
all i need is if 102 is in one cell, and 101 is in another cell, i need a formula in a 3rd cell that works out my percentage weight loss.

many thanks


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#3
January 5, 2006 at 08:01:57

Hi heardy, wizard fred, hello everyone,

heardy,

A1 for your starting weight

B1 for your current weight

C1 =100%-A1/A2

Include the equals sign in C1, it's not showing up in bold here for some reason.

Best Regards,
Mesich



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Related Solutions

#4
January 5, 2006 at 08:08:04

I haven't weighed 102 pounds since I was 12.

Soylent Green is PEOPLE!!!


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#5
January 5, 2006 at 08:08:54

Sorry. Typing what I'm thinking. LOL

Soylent Green is PEOPLE!!!


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#6
January 5, 2006 at 08:16:29

Hi Jennifer SUMN,

LOL!

I haven't checked for sure but I believe my right leg weighs that. :-)

Best Regards,
Mesich



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#7
January 5, 2006 at 12:32:57

Jenn - LOL

Mesich - What happened to Mesich.com? I see that you still have it as a homepage but it shows as Suspended when visiting it.

Bryan


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#8
January 5, 2006 at 13:08:32

mesich: The 100% should be subtracted to properly show the direction of change and the new/old has to be converted to a percentage.

More frequently percentage change is shown as:
((new weight - old weight) / old weight) * 100



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#9
January 6, 2006 at 01:07:11

Hi All, and thanks for the comments, and just to let you all know i'm talking Kg's not pounds, so i'm quite a big lad!

Wizard fred, how would this formula be written?
Would it not be ((old weight - new weight) / old weight)*100??

Many Thanks all


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#10
January 6, 2006 at 01:37:17

The old weight is the reference. If the new weight is less than the old weight then the weight change is negative. Assuming old weight is 200 pounds, new weight 190 pounds, change is -10 pounds, percent loss is 5% (-10/200)* 100

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#11
January 7, 2006 at 07:30:15

Hello everyone,

Hi wizard-fred,

You are correct, thanks for pointing that out.

Hi Bryan,

It should be back up shortly, we were hoping to have it back up and running earlier this week. I removed the website link from My Computing.net and also changed the email address to a secondary.

Best Regards,
Mesich



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#12
January 7, 2006 at 13:23:06

A major minor correction the example should show a -5%.

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