Win XP Pro 'Network Cable Unplugged' (networking problem)

February 25, 2012 at 16:24:29
Specs: Windows XP

So I've tried setting up standard broadband through century link. I've set up the modem and everything, but my computer still won't recognize the ethernet cable.

I can't update the driver, because it is the best currently. I even bought a USB ethernet adapter, and that still didn't work.

When I do IPCONFIG /ALL I get "media disconnected" though the ethernet cable is connected to the port in the back of the computer.

The ethernet cable and modem are working fine. (I know this because I took the cable and plugged both ends into the ethernet ports and both light up)

I've tried everything, and I still don't know what to do.

Can anyone help me?


See More: Win XP Pro Network Cable Unplugged (networking problem)

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#1
February 25, 2012 at 16:31:59


Did you receive a patch cable with the modem? If so, try using that one. It may be a crossover cable. You can't tell the difference by looking. Cable is the same, the pin down on one end is different.

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#2
February 25, 2012 at 16:38:52

By patch cable, what do you mean?

I just received one yellow ethernet cable. By the looks of it, both ends of this cable are the same.


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#3
February 25, 2012 at 18:18:29

CAT5/6 cable has 4 twisted pairs of wires. The order in which they are punched down into the connector can vary. You can't see it from the outside.

Your modem may or may not require a cross over cable.

The question was are you using the cable that came with it?


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Related Solutions

#4
February 25, 2012 at 18:30:32

Yes I was, and it wasn't working.

I just went out a bought a new cable, and that didn't work either. :l


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#5
February 25, 2012 at 19:53:29

Are you connecting the cable to an integrated Networking device in your tower? If so, is there a green light on right at the point of connection?

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#6
February 25, 2012 at 20:39:29

There is no light, which seems to indicate that the port isn't recognizing the cable.

As far as I can tell, it seems that the modem is working, and my computer is not. What I don't know is how to fix this problem.

Like I said before, I couldn't update the driver, and using another cable didn't work...


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#7
February 26, 2012 at 02:06:52

Do you have the motherboard chipset drivers and network adapter drivers installed?

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#8
February 26, 2012 at 06:40:18

I assume so. Is there any way to check to make sure I have those drivers installed?

I know I have one driver installed for sure, and it's apparently updated so no driver is better at this point.


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#9
February 26, 2012 at 06:46:08

Look in Windows Device Manager to see if the network adapter is working properly.

I assume you want to use Internet Explorer as your browser. Click on the IE icon to open it. Go to tools> interne options> connections> setup. Follow the prompts.

I am currently using IE8 so the steps in you see may be different but the process is the same.


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#10
February 26, 2012 at 07:33:00

It says that the device is working properly when I go to Device Manager. Should I try uninstalling it?

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#11
February 26, 2012 at 08:28:49

No need. You need to setup your internet connection and possibly the modem. Did you try my instructions above to configure your internet connection?

From your first post I would guess you don't have the modem configured right. Did you get a CD with it? Do you have the AC to the modem connected and the cable from the provider connected?


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#12
February 26, 2012 at 09:41:26

Well all I got with the modem is an ethernet cable, a green cord, and a power cord. I set it up with the instructions that they gave me. What does AC stand for?

Also, I'm using firefox :p

Ok, so I set up a new broadband connection. When I try connecting, it gives me Error 678, even though that my ethernet cable is connected to the computer and the modem...


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#13
February 26, 2012 at 12:06:51

AC = Alternating Current (the polarity of the current switches 50 or 60 times a second) = AC Power = the power you get from a wall socket. Depending on where you are, that's either ~ 110 volts or ~ 220 volts AC.

Most high speed modems do not have a direct AC connection - they use an AC adapter = AC to DC adapter - the DC (Direct Current - the current always has the same polarity) end of it's connection plugs into a small port on the high speed modem.
....

Do you have more than one network port on your computer ?
If yes, the one nothing is connected to is being detected as working but it is going to generate a message in Windows that it's not connected. You can disable that message, or disable that network adapter in Device Manager, if you want to.
......

A standalone high speed modem has only ONE wired network port.

If your device has has MORE than one wired network port, it's NOT a standalone high speed modem, it's a combo router / high speed modem, and it has either a telephone jack or a coax cable connector that you plug a cable into or connect a coax cable to that connects to the internet, as well as, usually, one network port labeled WAN, and 4 other network ports.
DO NOT connect the network cable between your computer's wired network port and the WAN port - doing that may NOT allow a connection to the internet - connect it to any OTHER network port on the device.
.....

"standard broadband through century link."

CenturyLink™ High-Speed Internet/DSL Service
http://www.centurylink.com/home/int...

You have a combo wireless router / ADSL high speed modem.
It probably has 5 network ports on it, one labeled WAN, and 4 other ones.

You must connect a telephone cable to it to connect to the internet, that has ADSL service enabled for it. .
If you have just paid for the internet package, it may take several days until the ADSL internet connection actually works.
.....

You often need to Restart Windows after you have made a change with your network cable connection, THEN you can be sure running IPconfig will show you the correct info.
....

The network cable that came with the high speed modem (or combo router / modem) is the correct type.
If you use another network cable you have, it may not be.
They are either
- wired "straight through" - all the wires connect to the same contacts in the connectors on both ends
- cross-wired - SOME of the wires are connected to different contacts in the two connectors.
.....

When the end connectors on the network cable are clear, which is usually if not always the case, you CAN see which color of wire is connected to the contacts inside the end connectors.
Each of the 4 pairs of wires that are twisted around one another inside the cable's sheath are a color, and white with a stripe of the same color.
If you place the clear end connectors beside each other, same side up, facing the same direction, you can easily see whether the colored / striped wires are arranged the same or differently.

Whatever type of network cable it is, it it is getting a working connection, usually the led for the network ports it's plugged into light up on both ends when the cable is connected.
However, the computer often must be running for it's network port led to light up, Windows must have the drivers for the wired network adapter installed, and Device Manger must show the network adapter is working, and in a small number of cases, the wired network adapter on the computer may have no led.

If the network cable is the WRONG type, the led for the port will NOT light up on BOTH ends of the connection.
(If the led lights up on ONE end, the connection IS working.)


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#14
February 26, 2012 at 13:38:26

I do not have more than one ethernet port on my computer. My computer is 6 years old.

There are 4 ethernet ports on the modem. So the cable I have is cross-wired, and it was given to me with the rest of the modem. It's not lighting up though on either end, and the device manager says that the adapter is working properly.

I have had phone service through century link for a long time, and plugged it into the port labeled "phone" on the modem, but it still doesn't work.


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#15
February 26, 2012 at 13:42:25

Read the manual for the modem. One of the ports may be intended to connect a router.

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#16
February 26, 2012 at 14:52:31

The instructions say "Plug the yellow Ethernet cable into any Ethernet port on the modem and your computer. The Ethernet light on the modem will turn green and may flicker."

The light is not turning on :l


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#17
February 26, 2012 at 15:51:08

You don't have a (standalone) modem !
You have a combo router / modem.

I''ve never seen a combo router / modem that does not have one network port labelled WAN, but it's quite possible it doesn't have it.

(The WAN - Wide Area Network - port is for connecting to a network hub box or a network switch box if you need more wired ports. You DO NOT connect that to a router unless you disable some of the settings in it's configuration so that it's just a network hub or switch box).


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#18
February 26, 2012 at 16:15:36

It doesn't have a port labeled WAN.

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#19
February 26, 2012 at 17:31:01

I think your computer is not set up properly. Do you have another computer to test?

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#20
February 26, 2012 at 19:51:34

I do not. By computer do you mean that I have the whole setup wrong, or that something is just wrong with my computer?

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#21
February 27, 2012 at 05:03:28

What services do you have from your cable provider and who is your provider? (full name)

It sounds like your modem is not getting a connection from the provider.


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#22
February 27, 2012 at 06:06:32

You have a combined Modem/Router, there are 5 ports on the rear, and was it supplied by your Internet Service Provider, also what country do you reside ?

One is RJ11 which is marked Phone, which goes to a standard ADSL enabled phone line.

Does the ADSL light on front of Modem/Router light up ?

4 are RJ45 and number 1 is connected to the Ethernet Port on the PC via a Patch (straight thru) Ethernet Cable

If the light on the PC Ethernet Port or the light on the router is not lighting you have not got a 2 way connection, therefore are you sure it is a patch cable ?

Googling is quicker than waiting for an answer....


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#23
February 27, 2012 at 07:20:19

OtheHill
Jollicloud

In the first post he said he has "standard broadband through century link."

As I found in response 14, I assume that's this:

CenturyLink™ High-Speed Internet/DSL Service
http://www.centurylink.com/home/int...

He says it has 4 network ports, no WAN port.
......

StealthGunnar1

Is that the ISP package you talikng about ?

The led should come on on at least one port when both ends of the cable are connected - the computer probably must be running for one to come on at that end - the combo router / modem must be powered on.

The network cable end connectors must be all the way into the ports.
The end connectors on the network cable should "latch" into the ports - the cable should not come out of the port when you merely pull on it - it should be necessary to depress the plastic lever on the end connector to remove it from the port.

Do you have another network cable you can try ?


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#24
February 27, 2012 at 07:59:59

Tubesandwires

it may be a matter of semantics, but to me "standard broadband through century link" means CABLE. Elsewhere the OP mentions DSL. I asked for clarification.


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#25
February 27, 2012 at 11:05:38

I am in UK. I too asked clarification as ADSL to me denotes Phone Line Broadband, Cable means Firbre Optic.

Century is USA and I am not able to access the website fully.......

Googling is quicker than waiting for an answer....


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#26
February 27, 2012 at 13:37:48

I live in the USA. There is not a light for the 'phone' line on the modem, but I know it's working because I still have a line when the modem is connected to the outlet.

I tried another network cable, and that didn't work either. Yes, I made sure that it 'snapped' into the port.

I tried googling it, and yet I cannot find a solution that fixes my problem.


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#27
February 27, 2012 at 13:50:11

If there is a brand and model number on the modem it might help if you posted it.

Also explain the sequence of events with this company. I am confused. Did the internet previously work with this provider? What?


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#28
February 27, 2012 at 14:46:00

ADSL has a splitter on the Master Socket to split the Analogue Phone Voice Signal from the Digital Internet Signal. Is this what you have ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adsl

Who supplied the Modem/Router ? Century ? Make/Model ?

Googling is quicker than waiting for an answer....


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#29
February 28, 2012 at 05:19:22

The modem I'm using: Qwest (WPS PK5000)

It was provided by Qwest or Century Link.

http://estore.it-dreamz.net/images/...
http://www.actiontec.com/products/i...

That's what my modem basically is and looks like.


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#30
February 28, 2012 at 07:48:46

Answer my questions in #27 above.

Did Century Link certify you are close enough to their services for the internet to work? Below is the data sheet for your modem. It spells out the parameters needed for things to work.

http://www.actiontec.com/products/d...


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#31
February 28, 2012 at 08:23:56

Whether the DSL or ADSL connection works that supplies the connection to the internet is another matter.

The led for the network ports should light up on both ends, or on at least one end if one port on the computer end has no led, when the network cable is connected between the computer's (only in this case) wired network adapter and the port on the combo router / modem, when....
- the computer is running
- the computer's wired network adapter has had the drivers installed for it installed properly and Device Manager shows it's working correctly
- the right type of network cable is used, it's not damaged, and it's end connectors are all the way into the ports on both ends of the connection.

I suspect the combo router / modem is defective


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#32
February 28, 2012 at 08:33:06

OK this is the Modem/Router:

http://www.actiontec.com/products/p...

I would reset back to factory defaults, if that does not work send it back for a replacement...............

Googling is quicker than waiting for an answer....


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#33
February 28, 2012 at 09:54:18

The leds (or one led) lighting up should work regardless of the settings in the combo router / modem's configuration.

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#34
February 28, 2012 at 16:44:10

I've had phone with Century Link for a couple years now. I just got internet from them and am trying to hook it up.

So is it possible that the modem is not working correctly even though when I plug both ends of the ethernet cable into the modem, both lights light up? I did that to test to see if the cable was the problem...

EDIT: I just noticed that the computer has IEEE 802.1, but I don't have a wireless device for a wireless connection. Does this mean I will not be able to establish a connection unless I get a wireless device?


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#35
February 29, 2012 at 07:00:15

"So is it possible that the modem is not working correctly even though when I plug both ends of the ethernet cable into the modem, both lights light up? I did that to test to see if the cable was the problem..."

That DOES probably prove there's nothing wrong with the cable or the circuits on the combo router / modem that make the leds for the ports light up, but doesn't necessarily indicate there's no problem with the combo router / modem.

We have been assuming that there's nothing wrong with the wired network adapter on the computer.
I have seen a few cases where there was something wrong that Windows was not detecting.
- A poor connection of a card - If the wired network adapter is on a card installed in a mboard slot, make sure that it's all the way down in it's slot.
- Card in the wrong slot - if the network card is in the last PCI slot closest to the center of the mboard, that slot usually shares it's IRQ with the video, and you're likely to have problems with any card in that slot unless it's a PCI video card - move the network card to another PCI slot
- the circuits on a network card could have been damaged yet Windows detects nothing wrong - e.g. by the card not having been all the way down in it's slot when the computer was running, or it was damaged by a power spike or surge during a power failure event.

If you DO have a network card installed in a mboard slot
- make sure it's all the way down in it's slot and that it's not in that PCI slot closest to the center of the mboard
- it's cheap to replace if there is something wrong with it

Do you have access to another computer, yours or a friends, you could try connecting the combo router / modem to ?

"EDIT: I just noticed that the computer has IEEE 802.1, but I don't have a wireless device for a wireless connection. Does this mean I will not be able to establish a connection unless I get a wireless device?"

All wireless routers, or combo router / modems, that have wired network ports can be connected to via a wired or wireless connection or both. You DO NOT have to connect to it wirelessly - that's just an option.


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#36
February 29, 2012 at 07:37:19

Look at the link below and configure the settings as instructed?

http://support.actiontec.com/doc_fi...


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#37
February 29, 2012 at 13:25:06

Wow, this might be really helpful. Thank you! I'll try it this weekend when I have access to the computer.

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#38
March 1, 2012 at 07:21:05

OtheHill's link in response 36 refers to info for how to get the DSL/ADSL connection to work.

As I said I in response 31 and 33...

"Whether the DSL or ADSL connection works that supplies the connection to the internet is another matter."

"The leds (or one led) lighting up should work regardless of the settings in the combo router / modem's configuration."

It's more likely that there is someting wrong regarding your wired network adapter on the computer than there is something wrong with the combo router / modem.
See response 35.



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#39
March 1, 2012 at 08:04:50

From #1 above "I know this because I took the cable and plugged both ends into the ethernet ports and both light up".

I am not sure of the consequences of looping 2 ports on the modem is.

From #22 above "One is RJ11 which is marked Phone, which goes to a standard ADSL enabled phone line".

From #28 above "ADSL has a splitter on the Master Socket to split the Analogue Phone Voice Signal from the Digital Internet Signal. Is this what you have" ?

You have not explained adequately how the modem is currently cabled? You stated you previously had phone service with this company. That would have been Analog service I assume. ADSL is a digital service.


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#40
March 2, 2012 at 06:50:24

On the modem, I have the ethernet cord plugged into the port lableled "ethernet." I also have my phone cord plugged into the "phone" line. I have the power cord connected as well which is connected to an outlet. Finally, there is a green cord connected to the port labeled "line" on the modem, which in turn is connected to the outlet.

The thing I don't understand is how I'm going to know if the problem is with the network adapter in my computer or the modem. For all I know, both could be malfunctioning or broken or something.

As for ADSL vs. DSL, I don't really know. I'm kind of setting this up for my mom. Just think of the most basic/simple/most common phone service, the phone line simply connected to the wall.

And as for the parameters of the modem, I can only assume that Century Link labeled my computer 'fit' for this broadband internet installation, else I don't know why they'd actually send me the equipment necessary to hook it up. I'll get back to you on that one.


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#41
March 2, 2012 at 07:37:00

I was questioning if the line into the modem from the ISP is straight digital or if there is a filter in the mix.

If you can connect a standard household phone to that jack and it works then there may be a filter in the line somewhere.

Reread Jolicloud's posts.


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#42
March 2, 2012 at 08:39:35

"The thing I don't understand is how I'm going to know if the problem is with the network adapter in my computer or the modem."

It's NOT a ("standalone" high speed) modem. It's a combo router / (high speed) modem.

As I said in response 38....

"It's more likely that there is someting wrong regarding your wired network adapter on the computer than there is something wrong with the combo router / modem.
See response 35."

DSL = Digital Subscriber Line
ADSL - Asynchronous Digital Subscriber Line
Ther're both digital.

In my area, it's ADSL for a cheaper connection package, which I was using for years.
Now I'm using a connection package from the same ISP that involvles a fibre optic connection at a box closer to my location - it still requires a telephone cable connection. I'm not sure whether that's still ADSL. It provides both TV and a higher max speed internet connection.

When you're using a normal DSL or ADSL connection package, all devices that connect to the same phone line that has that capability EXCEPT the high speed modem or combo router / high speed modem are supposed to have a filter inline in the telephone line connection to prevent problems with those devices - e.g. a dial-up modem on a computer or a fax machine
If you connect such a filter inline in between the telephone line wall connection and the high speed modem or combo router / high speed modem , it will NOT be able to connect to the internet.

With my present connection package from the same ISP that involvles a fibre optic connection at a box closer to my location, I don't need to have a DSL / ADSL blocking filter inline betwee any device on the same phone line.

However, NONE of that affects whether the combo router / modem network cable connection to the computer's wired network adapter works - it only affects whether the DSL or ADSL connection to the internet works.


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#43
March 5, 2012 at 07:09:30

Thanks for all the help guys!

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#44
March 5, 2012 at 20:19:27

Thanks for the thanks.

Have you figured out what the problem is / was yet ?


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#45
March 8, 2012 at 07:15:51

Disable the Ethernet network adapter if you are not using it. This applies, for example, when running a WiFi home network with computers that have built-in Ethernet adapters. To disable the adapter, double-click the small Network Cable Unplugged error window and choose the Disable option.

than follow the link below and you will get your answer.

http://www.techyv.com/questions/net...


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