Solved Why does my wifi router lose speed and connection?

October 12, 2016 at 13:45:33
Specs: Windows 10 64
How do I figure out why I can get 100mb when hard wired to modem and unstable and no more than 25mb when wifi router is connected? Already tried changing channels, brand new modem and router. What could be interfering with the connection?

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✔ Best Answer
October 16, 2016 at 20:35:04
It looks like this is a Cable connection?

Is there any splitter on your incoming cable ? More Cable TV set top boxes or TV's?
Problems with coax cables:

Aging. Cracks and corrosion on the connectors and cable shielding. Water/vapor seeping in to the cable.

Signal Interference. outside electrical fields from power lines, transmitters, household equipment etc. get in through poorly connected and aging cable connections.

An article from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable...
Quote:
Shared bandwidth:
In most residential broadband technologies, such as FTTX, Satellite Internet, or WiMAX, a population of users share the available bandwidth. Some technologies share only their core network, while some including Cable Internet and PON also share the access network. This arrangement allows the network operator to take advantage of statistical multiplexing, a bandwidth sharing technique which is employed to distribute bandwidth fairly, in order to provide an adequate level of service at an acceptable price. However, the operator has to monitor usage patterns and scale the network appropriately, to ensure that customers receive adequate service even during peak-usage times. If the network operator does not provide enough bandwidth for a particular neighborhood, the connection would become saturated and speeds would drop if many people are using the service at the same time. Operators have been known to use a bandwidth cap, or other bandwidth throttling technique; users' download speed is limited during peak times, if they have downloaded a large amount of data that day
Unquote.

Personal experience:

Up until a year ago I had internet over cable. The first years it was OK with few interruptions (not uncommon in this typhoon prone country). The last 2 years steadily more unstable connections for no apparent reason with cutoffs for more than a day.

In the meantime fiber was deployed in this area and since a year now internet over fiber and so far no problem at all (fingers crossed).




#1
October 12, 2016 at 13:53:14
What is the make/model of your router?

What is the make/model of the modem?

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
October 12, 2016 at 13:57:49
modem - Arris CM820
router - Netgear AC1200 model R6100

:)


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#3
October 12, 2016 at 14:31:48
I just spoke with the cable company for like the 200th time. I am going to go by tomorrow and pick up a bigger modem. The modem they gave me doesn't even handle what I am paying for. I will update if that resolves tomorrow. Thank you!

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Related Solutions

#4
October 12, 2016 at 16:00:05
wireless versus ethernet
http://bit.ly/2dYsQQf

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#5
October 12, 2016 at 17:10:20
You have to realize that there's advertised internet speed (which is theoretical) & actual speed. Actual speed will always be lower. What speed plan are you paying for? Is it business or residential service? My local cable company's top residential plan offers "up to 50Mbps".

Ethernet has several speed standards - 10Mbps, 100Mbps, 1000Mbps (Gigabit), etc. You didn't state how you're determining speed, but if you're seeing 100Mbps for your hard-wire connection, it's likely the theoretical speed.

http://smallbusiness.chron.com/thre...

Wireless also has several speed standards - B (11Mbps), G (54Mbps), N (150Mbps*), AC (1000Mbps, aka 1Gbps).

http://homenetworkadmin.com/wireles...

Even if you have a top of the line wireless AC router, your computer or laptop would have to have a a wireless-AC adapter to reach the highest transfer rate possible. If your wireless adapter is N or G, the rates will be considerably lower. Then of course, you have to consider distance from the router, number of walls or floors the signal is passing thru, interference from other devices or your neighbor's wifi signals, humidity, etc.


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#6
October 12, 2016 at 21:29:35
Yes, sounds like you may need a faster NIC card (desktop) or a USB NIC adapter if your card is an older slower type.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
October 13, 2016 at 08:21:59
OMG!

From riiders's first link: "The Three Most Common Ethernet Speeds"

I almost stopped reading there. Networks are rated in bandwidth, not speed. If you're not sure of the difference, in a nutshell, speed is a rating of how quickly (or slowly) an object in motion is travelling (ie: velocity = distance/time).

Bandwidth on the other hand, is how much data can flow past any one place on a network in one second. 100 Mbps is not ten times faster than 10 Mbps, it carries ten times as much data. The "speed" of transmission remains constant.

Then I read, "A network switch -- or hub -- supports..."

A switch and a hub are two different devices. A hub broadcasts all traffic to all ports whereas a switch intelligently manages traffic. Say a device plugged into port one of a switch is "talking" to a device plugged into port four. The traffic only flows between ports one and four. Whereas on a hub, that same traffic would be broadcast to all ports (both directions) I'm not sure anybody even manufactures hubs any more as the least intelligent switch out there is an infinitely better device to use than a hub. I know I haven't seen one in a workplace in over a decade.

I had to stop here because the article was obviously written by a moron who didn't even spend 5 minutes researching the topic before beginning to write on it.

With regard to bandwidth usage. One can expect to realize approximately 85% of their rated bandwidth as "usable" Which is to say, with a 100 Mbps connection you can expect to be able to use up to 85 Mbps at any given time. The rest will be used up in overhead.

Wireless, due to inherent issues with lag and latency will never perform as well as wired. So a 1000 Mbps wired connection will always be better than a 1000 Mbps wireless connection.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***

message edited by Curt R


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#8
October 13, 2016 at 08:22:36
I just spoke with the cable company for like the 200th time. I am going to go by tomorrow and pick up a bigger modem. The modem they gave me doesn't even handle what I am paying for. I will update if that resolves tomorrow. Thank you!

Excellent. As somebody else mentioned, do please get back to us and let us know if that fixed your issue.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#9
October 14, 2016 at 14:53:50
I picked up and used the router/modem combo unit they gave me last night. It ran well for several hours of my normal high use. Hardwired it was pulling 108mb as it was before and wireless it was up to 40mb when I did speedtests. We will see how it does next few days. I think it will do better when I get a new pc in a few months but for now this is my only option. Unless you think an external nic would assist? >.> I don't know if that is worth trying or not. It hasn't dropped the net completely like it was doing before. Sometimes I would have to reboot modem and router because it would kill all net in house, even on xbox, etc. Thanks for all your help!

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#10
October 14, 2016 at 18:04:44
I think your wireless speed is the best you will get.

http://liveqos.com/wp-content/uploa...


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#11
October 16, 2016 at 08:40:19
think it will do better when I get a new pc in a few months

I hate to break it to you but, this isn't likely to make a difference. The bottleneck is your external connection which is 100 Mbps. Your PC's network interface (NIC) is likely connecting at 1000 Mbps (check and verify) I say likely because it's possible the router portion of the device you received from your provider may have 100 Mbps LAN ports. So yes, check and see what the NIC on your PC is connecting to the router at. If it is 1 Gig (1000 Mbps) then you can't improve that by purchasing a new computer.

Not that I'm saying don't buy a new PC. I'm just saying that a new PC won't affect your bandwidth rates. Your present PC's NIC (if connecting to the router at 1 Gig) is capable of 10 times the bandwidth you're actually getting from your provider. Chances are your new PC will also have a 1 Gig NIC too so there won't be any change from that aspect.


Unless you think an external nic would assist?

No it would not. Again, the NIC would likely be 1000 Mbps but the issue is your external connection.

I have an older SOHO Router connecting to my external connection. The LAN ports on it are only rated for 100 Mbps. This in turn connects to the rest of my LAN which is 1000 Mbps. You might wonder, why does a professional network guy have a measly 100 Mbps LAN connection on his SOHO Router. The simple answer is, because my external connection is lower than that. I live in a small community, the fastest internet connection I can get (at present) is 6 Mbps. Therefore I do not need any faster connection on the LAN side of my router than 100 Mbps. Since the old router works just perfectly, I see no reason to replace it with one that has 1000 Mbps LAN ports since it won't change or improve, anything from the perspective of my external to internal bandwidth.

It sounds to me like your new router/modem is working nicely and you have nothing to worry about. As sluc pointed out, 40 Mbps is pretty good for the wireless side of your LAN. If like me, you're a gamer, you will want your gaming rig to be connected with a network cable, not wireless.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#12
October 16, 2016 at 10:12:30
Well, I appreciate all of the input. Unfortunately, after that first evening of it working well, it is not dropping connection again. It does it on my iphone as well so I don't think it is my machine. It is so random. The other night it also dropped while hard wired. I am at my wits end. Been battling for months with Suddenlink. The only thing left for me to tell them to fix it from the house to the alley or the node I am on. We have put in separate new line for internet only. All new equipment inside. Numerous technician visits. So frustrating. I can't think of anything else that could be causing it to go up and down so much. My laptop is 3 years old and I just don't think it is the problem. I have troubleshooted it as much as I think I can. When I see it happening on my iphone as well it just doesn't add up. Iphone is only 2 months old. The only other devices I have to try are 2 xboxes and an old ipad. Any ideas?

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#13
October 16, 2016 at 15:35:09
Fix network connection issues in Windows 10
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us...

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#14
October 16, 2016 at 20:35:04
✔ Best Answer
It looks like this is a Cable connection?

Is there any splitter on your incoming cable ? More Cable TV set top boxes or TV's?
Problems with coax cables:

Aging. Cracks and corrosion on the connectors and cable shielding. Water/vapor seeping in to the cable.

Signal Interference. outside electrical fields from power lines, transmitters, household equipment etc. get in through poorly connected and aging cable connections.

An article from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cable...
Quote:
Shared bandwidth:
In most residential broadband technologies, such as FTTX, Satellite Internet, or WiMAX, a population of users share the available bandwidth. Some technologies share only their core network, while some including Cable Internet and PON also share the access network. This arrangement allows the network operator to take advantage of statistical multiplexing, a bandwidth sharing technique which is employed to distribute bandwidth fairly, in order to provide an adequate level of service at an acceptable price. However, the operator has to monitor usage patterns and scale the network appropriately, to ensure that customers receive adequate service even during peak-usage times. If the network operator does not provide enough bandwidth for a particular neighborhood, the connection would become saturated and speeds would drop if many people are using the service at the same time. Operators have been known to use a bandwidth cap, or other bandwidth throttling technique; users' download speed is limited during peak times, if they have downloaded a large amount of data that day
Unquote.

Personal experience:

Up until a year ago I had internet over cable. The first years it was OK with few interruptions (not uncommon in this typhoon prone country). The last 2 years steadily more unstable connections for no apparent reason with cutoffs for more than a day.

In the meantime fiber was deployed in this area and since a year now internet over fiber and so far no problem at all (fingers crossed).



Reply ↓  Report •


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