Use Remote DNS over VPN

March 27, 2009 at 09:49:08
Specs: Windows Server 2003
I'm trying to figure out how to use the Remote DNS when I VPN into the office from home.

We have the router set up to use VPN from a Windows Server in the office. That server (VPNSVR) has controls remote access. On a different system in the network, we have a DNS server (DNSSVR) which serves internal name addressing. The VPNSVR has been assigned statically the DNS IP from the DNSSVR.

When I VPN in from home, I was hoping that I would be assigned the remote DNS.

Anyone familiar with something like this?


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#1
March 27, 2009 at 10:55:21
In a properly configured AD domain, all internal requests are handled by the internal DNS server. When a request comes along for external resources, the internal DNS forwards the request to an external DNS server (like your providers).

If you don't have forwarding configured properly on your DNS server, then you won't get any resolution for requests outside the local zone.

I'm not sure what you mean by "remote DNS" when you say, "When I VPN in from home, I was hoping that I would be assigned the remote DNS.". For that matter, I don't know why you would want to connect to it. As I said above, if you have your DNS configured properly, requests both inside and outside the local zone would be handled by the proper DNS server.

Perhaps if you explained what it is you're trying to do, and why you think this "remote DNS" will do it for you, we may be able to be of more help. As it stands, your question really doesn't make a whole lot of sense......at least, not to me it doesn't.


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#2
March 27, 2009 at 11:08:50
Thanks for helping me out.

Our DNS assigns hostnames for some internal servers in the office.

What I want to do is connect to the VPN, and have those hostnames available to me from home.

I've already set up the DNS to forward to ISP DNS's.


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#3
March 27, 2009 at 12:08:52
I think you misunderstand what DNS is and what it does.

Our DNS assigns hostnames for some internal servers in the office.

Wrong. DNS provides hostname to IP address resolution it doesn't 'assign' anything to anything. Say your server's name is Server1 and it's IP is 192.168.1.100

DNS resolves "Server1" to "192.168.1.100" so you can, in a command prompt window, type something like ping Server1 and it will respond to the ping. Also, when mapping a drive you would map to \\Server1\share. You could also map: \\192.168.1.100\share but "Server1" is easier to remember than an IP address.

What I want to do is connect to the VPN, and have those hostnames available to me from home.

Providing the servers are in the same physical/logical network and their DNS host records are correct (ie: show the correct server name to the correct IP address) then it should work properly. I think maybe you have some misconfiguration with your DNS server and it's host records pertaining to other servers within your environment.

I know that where I work, once you've VPN'd into our network, all servers and resources available to a user (based on their domain username and what, if any, resources they have available to them) are available to the user as if they were logged into their work computer in their office.


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#4
April 9, 2009 at 18:39:20
What you are talking about is called "split DNS" or "split tunneling". The VPN appliance must support this OR you can manually enter the ipaddress/hostname information into your hosts file (c:\windows\systems32\etc\hosts). I use a Cisco ASA and have split DNS setup for my remote VPN users. This allows DNS requests for internal range subnets to be forwarded to the internal DNS servers. This is especially useful when an internal resource is DNS'd differently internally and externally. Hopefully this helps.

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