Unable to Host Game Servers

Sony VAIO
April 29, 2009 at 13:30:48
Specs: Windows XP Home, P4 HT 3.0GHZ/1gig DDR
I just recently got cable internet as an upgrade from dialup, and immediately tried hosting a server from Garry's Mod, a game based on Valve's Source engine. It worked without a hitch. Due to my family and friend's large use of laptops, a wireless router was soon in the future, and as soon as we got it, my hosting ability disappeared.

As far as I can tell, the following ports are required to be open:
1200-1200 TCP/UDP
27000-27015 TCP/UDP
27020-27039 TCP/UDP

I've tried opening them with almost every method available in the router settings, but its not working. I still cant host. I eventually tried the DMZ set to my modem's IP, but it didn't work either. My friends, upon viewing my server info, shows that the IP is 192.168.1.102:27015. This isn't right, as you probably know.

I have a Motorola SB5101 Surfboard modem, and a Cisco Linksys WRT160N V2 router. ANY suggestions will be helpful, and appreciated.

Just a bit too reto


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#1
April 29, 2009 at 17:59:19
Either you didn't set the port forwarding correctly or your ISP noticed the traffic & blocked it. It's against the TOS.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
April 30, 2009 at 04:26:19
That would be a possibility except for w/o the router it works fine.

Also, it seems that DMZ doesn't open all my ports like it should...

Just a bit too reto


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#3
April 30, 2009 at 06:13:39
If it still works without the router, then your port forwarding settings aren't correct. I'm not a gamer, so I don't know the port settings. The only thing I can tell you is that the source port has to be "any" since both MS & Unix use random source ports.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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Related Solutions

#4
April 30, 2009 at 07:51:03
I am a gamer and I can tell you from personal experience that you will need to indeed use a port forward if you wish to host games.

Simply put, external traffic coming into your SOHO router is stopped at that point (not including return traffic from surfing, downloading etc)

So if you're hosting a game and I try to connect to it, when I type your external IP into my game software and click connect, that traffic hits your router and will be dropped unless you have configured a port forward that will:

Take all traffic coming in on that port and forward it to the PC hosting the game.

Typically, the port forward will say something to the effect of:

"Take traffic on port #? and send it to IP address XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX on my LAN"

So you really need to get the port forward configured correctly.


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#5
April 30, 2009 at 17:40:49
It has to say take traffic on "any" port & send it to xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx:port# on the LAN

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#6
May 1, 2009 at 07:30:51
Are you sure guapo? I know with my SOHO router, and all the other's I've done port forwards on, it's by port number as I described.

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#7
May 1, 2009 at 16:27:56
Well, we both know that Windows, Unix & Linux all use random source ports.

Run netstat -an from a Windows command prompt & look at the ports in both the local & foreign address columns, after the :

Here is an example from my netstat output. It's a connection from my XP box to a web server. If the web server is behind a router, there is no way that the router would know that my browser was going to choose port 4506 as it's source port. Therefore, if it's going to forward my request for that web site, it must accept "any" port as the source port. As in most cases, port 80 is the destination port for the web site.

TCP 192.168.1.97:4506 64.135.83.52:80 ESTABLISHED

The same has to be true with any server, it this case, a game server.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#8
May 2, 2009 at 06:20:12
Well, we both know that Windows, Unix & Linux all use random source ports

Yes indeed, we both do know that. But, we're talking about hosting a game from behind a firewall and allowing external connections to said game.

When you're talking about hosting a game via the internet (something I've done numerous times over the years) you need to find the source port of the game in question and input that into your forward. Each game has uses a unique port number and the trick is finding out what port that is and then progamming your forward with that info.

I haven't played this one in forever but I used to host Diablo II games and my friend would join in. I first googled "Diablo II port number" to find out what port the game uses. It is:
Allow port 4000 TCP out and in (hosting open games only)

I got the above port number from a quick google search and the following site: http://portforward.com/cportsnotes/battlenet/battlenet.htm

So I created a port forward that takes incoming traffic on port 4000 (TCP) and sends it to 192.168.1.50 - my XP Pro gaming rig.

I have another set to send port 8767 to 192.168.1.55 which is the port for teamspeak, and .55 is my teamspeak server (running on a Linux Distro) which my friend and I use so we can talk while playing.

I have a couple others, port 22 for SSH and port 115 for sftp and 3389 for RDC sessions. (On a side note, I now have things setup in such a way that when I go to connect to my home PC from work, I first establish and encrypted ssh session from my work PC (using Putty - it's an XP PC) and then I run an RDC session through that tunnel)

You're talking about web sites and web hosting and I suspect the rules are slightly different for setting forwards up for those.


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#9
May 2, 2009 at 08:26:30
I see where the confusion lies. Yes, you're correct. The rules are different for games or any program that has client software on the client machine. Then it could have a predetermined source port.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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