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Two ethernet cards use?

Dell
November 24, 2008 at 23:33:37
Specs: Windows server 2003, Quad Core

Dears,

I was wondering before purchasing my new company server. What would two 1GB ethernet cards function as?
I've read a little around that people double the link speed with it and/or do seperate connections or something but all websites are vauge I said I'd have no better place to understand this than someone from the pro team of computing to explain this to me? :)

I would appreciate your assistance and knowledge in this matter I would really like to fully get use of my new server.

Regards,
AJ


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#1
November 25, 2008 at 02:28:52

There are a few reasons why you might use two network adaptors in the same machine.

In a server you could use "adaptor teaming" which is used to provide fault tolerance in case one fails. You would use this in a mission critical application where any downtime is a disaster. It can be used for load balancing but only on send, not on receive.

Look up "adaptor teaming" on Google.

Two network adaptors can be bridged in order to connect two network nodes together or to configure a computer as a proxy server. You could also use two network cards to configure a computer as a firewall.

Stuart


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#2
November 25, 2008 at 08:01:18

I have been teaming adapters for over 10years and all teams have been in full duplex mode.

This means if you have two gig cards you get a combined 4000 mbps bandwidth with both sending and receiving.

I have ibm fiber cards in a ms server and they do load balancing and failover if one nic gets disconnected.

Example of Oxymoron:

Person who is pro life and anti sex education.
Education is key to prevention. Prevent conception you prevent abortion.

Abstinence training clearly isn't working.


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#3
November 25, 2008 at 10:13:30

Thanks everyone for your replies are there any specific softwares for all those load balancing and combining speed?

One more question what's the use if my cables are CAT5e and if the HDD RPM is only 15k?? What difference would 2 combined 4000 GB of speed do? writing speed and transfer speed are the same!

Regards,
AJ


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Related Solutions

#4
November 25, 2008 at 10:27:39

write and transfer are not the same. Not all data transferred is written to the drive.

4000mbps is not speed but bandwidth available for data transfers.

You need a managed switch that supports one of the teaming protocols.

Adapter teaming software is provided by the manufacturer of the nics.

Your drive should be mirrored [raid1] minimally. Depending on raid level not only do you get drive failover but an increase ins read/write speed from that of a standalone drive.

Example of Oxymoron:

Person who is pro life and anti sex education.
Education is key to prevention. Prevent conception you prevent abortion.

Abstinence training clearly isn't working.


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#5
November 25, 2008 at 12:16:22

Cat53 supports 1000 Mbps.

If you have dual, teamed, NIC's in your server connected to two 1000 Mbps ports on a switch and the switch itself supports LACP (link aggregation control protocol) you get an aggregate of 2000 Mbps between the server and switch.

This can easily be done over Cat5e copper.

With regard to rpm's, and read/write times on HDD's....keep in mind that you have a lot of RAM and a lot of buffer on a good server. If the disk can't write as fast as the data's coming in over the network it will simply buffer what it can't write immediately and hold it there until it can write it.


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