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Solved should I leave my wireless router switched on all the time ?

January 16, 2013 at 04:18:07
Specs: Windows XP, 1.93GB

I have recently changed my router from Netgear to TalkTalk because of an intermittent signal, no problem with my desktop ethernet or laptop wireless or tablet but I keep loosing connection with my WII internet connection for Netflix. Any suggestions?

See More: should I leave my wireless router switched on all the time ?

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#1
January 16, 2013 at 06:19:32
✔ Best Answer

In answer to your post title, yes, you should leave your router on all the time. If you keep switching it off, every time you turn it back on it will have to 'sync" with your DSL line which can sometimes take up to two or three minutes. The wait can be really annoying and can be avoided by not turning it off in the first place. Leaving it on will not do it any harm, they are designed to be left on 24/7.

For your Wii, you can try changing the wireless channel in your router's setup utility which runs in a web browser.


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#2
January 16, 2013 at 07:19:37

but I keep loosing connection with my WII internet connection for Netflix. Any suggestions?

This happens to me every now and then while watching Netflix on my Wii. Usually only during the peak hours though so I suspect it's due to traffic, not my WLAN at home.

If this only happens occasionally during peak internet usage hours, chances are your issue is just the load on the internet and/or Netflix.

If it happens with great frequency it could be the router. I would suggest if changing the channel on the WLAN doesn't do anything the next thing you should do is to ensure your router has the most up-to-date firmware installed on it (check on the OEM's website for that).

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
January 16, 2013 at 07:28:31

Many thanks Phil22 very helpful, I will leave my router on all the time. I have no idea how to change the wireless channel in my router, so I will see how it goes by leaving the router on.

Thanks again Richard


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#4
January 16, 2013 at 07:33:25

I disagree with the suggestion of putting router ON always even when network is not in use because of security reasons on hacking and intruders into your network.


Thanks.


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#5
January 16, 2013 at 08:55:00

azedas101

Without meaning to be rude.....you're allowed your opinion, but I feel you're above opinion is way off base.

If one uses WPA2 encryption and a complex encryption key, your WLAN (wireless LAN) is just about as secure as it can get.

Is it possible to hack into WPA2 encryption at this point in time? Not to the best of my knowledge. I know WEP encryption is easily hacked into, but I do not believe anybody has managed it with WPA2 at this point in time.

What that means to the end user at home is, if you enable WPA2 encryption and use a strong key, you're safe enough to leave your WLAN run 24/7.

While I don't personally use wireless if I can humanly avoid it (I'm a gamer and wireless sucks for gaming) I do have WLAN at home running 24/7 for my wife and for my Wii. I've had that WLAN running for years without issue. I am very confident nobody is going to hack into my WPA2 encrypted WLAN.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
January 16, 2013 at 08:59:41

I agree with azedas101, but not for hacking reasons. WiFi is a new thing and we are unsure of what effect it may have on us long term, especially if we're very close to a router.
Also this will add to your electricity bill.
I only have it on when I'm using it.

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#7
January 16, 2013 at 09:44:24

WPA2 Encryption can be hacked though some tools such as Black track tool and many more when advanced and experienced hacker is involved. More so, shutting down routers when not in use make them effective and efficient with a good life span.

Thanks


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#8
January 16, 2013 at 12:46:38

azedas101

I understand it's been done too. But my understanding is, it takes many hours and some seriously highend equipment. In fact, if I'm not mistaken, the article I read stated it look a cluster of highend something like 6 to 10 hours to crack WPA2.

You certainly won't be doing it quickly with a laptop while war driving around someone's neighbourhood in your car.

Besides, the people who want to use wifi for nefarious purposes know there are many, many "free" wifi hotspots out there to use so why, pray tell, would they bother wasting the necessary time to crack someone's WPA2 encryped WLAN. Simple answer is, they won't. They drive over to the nearest coffee shop (or whatever business) with the free wifi and they'll go in, buy a coffee and sit there and do whatever.

Using WPA2 encryption in a home situation is adequate protection against people with nefarious intent. You can make it more secure by using a complex key, a complex SSID, and by hiding the SSID. If you're really paranoid, you can also set your WLAN to only allow devices with MAC addresses you define to connect to your WLAN but personally, I think that's a bit of overkill myself.

iforget

WiFi is not "new" by any stretch of the imagination. Is it harmful? Perhaps if you duct tape a wireless router to your head and leave it there for a few years it might be. But making sweeping statements like that without proof is just heresay and of NO value. So unless you have several (as in, not just one) bonafide cases of injury from wireless, please keep your conspiracy theorist/doomsayer opinion to yourself.

As to power consumption. Shutting the wireless side of a router down won't save jack if it's still plugged in. Besides, if you really want to save money on electrical, you'll want to shut all the other electrical devices in your house down that consume a steady amount of power 24/7....like your TV, home theatre, stereo etc. Shutting down just your router won't save enough to matter.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#9
January 17, 2013 at 08:03:05

Thanks that you have an idea of wi-fi security but the tradition of hacking is not only to have access to your internet but typically to valuable information for users on the wi-fi such as bank account details, CC details and many more. I would advise you learn from others experiences as an IT personnel who is prone to probe when network is messed up through wi-fi.


Thanks.


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#10
January 17, 2013 at 09:02:10

azedas101

You're making it very hard for me to remain patient with you. I understand that English isn't your first language but you need to talk less and listen more. Which is to say, stop responding to posts in here and read and learn more.

This last post of yours has absolutely nothing to do with this thread.

I'm going to spell this out to you one more time and this is the last.

Due to how hard it is to hack WPA2 encryption, combined with the fact that there are MANY free wifi spots available to use in any urban area that are not encrypted, hackers will not bother attempting to hack a home users WPA2 encrypted WLAN

Commenting about what hackers are after is changing the subject and has NOTHING to do with a conversation about using WPA2 encryption in a home wireless network.

I'm going to ask you to please stop responding to threads in this forum. Your poor comprehension of English leads to you misunderstanding a lot of the posts and most of your responses make no sense or have little to do with the actual question at hand.

This isn't personal, it's about misinformation. We're to help people. At best, you're confusing them with things that have nothing to do with the question asked. At worst, you're giving incorrect information and poor advice to people. Overall this means you're not helping, you're doing the opposite.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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