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Solved sharing folder over the internet

July 1, 2007 at 08:22:48
Specs: XP Professional, 2.8GHZ 1024MB(RAM)

Hi, I am running Xp Pro, and I want to make one of the folders on my hard drive availible to another Xp Pro across the internet. I know this cmd command that mapps a drive to the folder of another computer but it only worked inside my LAN, I want it to work on a computer over WAN. I know what my IP is that my ISP gave me, but when I type that into a browser it just brings up my router configuration page. How do I get passed my router and onto my computer to access that folder through the internet?

Thanks, I could really use some help with this one, its got me stumpted.

Aswell, I don't want to use a vpn because I've heard only one user could access the folder at a time with a vpn and it needs to be able to support multiple users at one time.


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✔ Best Answer
July 1, 2007 at 10:04:07

I have told you what to do. You router gets an incoming HTTP request and it display the only HTTP page it knows about and that is the configuration page.

You need either a web server or an FTP server. There is no other way of doing it. The only way to get past the router is to tell it where to go via port forwarding. You cant do it with a URL. If that were possible every computer connected to the internet would be accessible by anyone.

The only other way of doing it is to put the computer you are trying to access into the DMZ. That is not recommended because that will make the computer accessible to every hacker from here to Vladivostok.

Stuart



#1
July 1, 2007 at 09:21:36

VPN is the way to do it. Only other way is to have some kind of server software on the computer you are trying to access like a web server or FTP server. You then need to configure your router to forward requests to that particular computer running that particular server.

At the moment you are trying to access a computer with a private address via a public address. Your router doesn't know how to handle incoming request to a private address until you tell it what to do.

Having your router configuration page accessible over the Internet is not a good idea either.

Stuart


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#2
July 1, 2007 at 09:36:59

Well when I type in my IP into a web browser it brings up the standard admin login for accessing my routers config page, so it's safe. But I wanted to know if it were possible to access my C: through a web browser by typing in the url in some special way (to get past the router) like ex. http://74.114.41.239(internet ip)//192.168.2.107(computer ip)//C: . There is nothing like that? Because that command I used will map a drive across the internet from a file on a remote computer, but it needs the computers ip (thus it has to get passed the router). I have a Linksys BEFSR41. Any help will be greatly appreciated. I really think there ought to be a way to do this.

Thanks
Schuby


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#3
July 1, 2007 at 09:51:50

You need a FTP or HTTP Server on the PC, within the router configuration pages you forward the required ports (this is in the router manual).

As you are using XP Pro you can use IIS:

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsser...

One can install from

Control Panel
add or remove programs
add/remove windows components


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Related Solutions

#4
July 1, 2007 at 10:04:07
✔ Best Answer

I have told you what to do. You router gets an incoming HTTP request and it display the only HTTP page it knows about and that is the configuration page.

You need either a web server or an FTP server. There is no other way of doing it. The only way to get past the router is to tell it where to go via port forwarding. You cant do it with a URL. If that were possible every computer connected to the internet would be accessible by anyone.

The only other way of doing it is to put the computer you are trying to access into the DMZ. That is not recommended because that will make the computer accessible to every hacker from here to Vladivostok.

Stuart


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#5
July 1, 2007 at 10:18:16

If you use IIS, you can share directories over the Internet and access them with WebDAV. WebDAV allows you to use My Network Places and use files on the server as if it were a network connection. You are getting your router's admin pages over the Internet probaly because remote administration is enabled. You can turn that off through the routers admin page. Check the manual for information on how to do that. Once you set up a Web server, you have to forward the port (HTTP is port 80) on your router. portforward.com has a step-by-step guide on how to do so. A VPN connection is also a good way to go when sharing files over the Internet. It has good authentication, and you can access data on a remote computer as if you were connected to the same LAN, and access all other networking services running on your computer. If you are going to use a VPN, you should make sure your user account is password protected. If you are going to use IIS or another server program, make sure you set up security settings accordingly to prevent unauterhized access, and put a password onto directoryies with shared files in it. Also, there are free services you can get that let you use a domain name to access your computer insted of an IP address. www.dyndns.org has a free Dynamic DNS service, so, for example, insted of typing http://74.114.41.239 into your web browser, you can type mycomputer.dyndns.org.

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#6
July 1, 2007 at 10:19:37

lol ok. So obviously you must realize I am a noob at this and I do greatly appreciate your help. But what I am trying to do is get this to work: http://www.chami.com/tips/windows/0... Could you tell me how to make my BEFSR41 understand that calls from this 'service' should go to my computer, and I know it works when I have my computer hooked straight into the internet, just not when it's behind this router.

Thanks again.
Schuby


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#7
July 2, 2007 at 11:39:44

Hi again, I think I know what I need now in order to get this to work. What I'm doing is I want to run the NET USE command on a computer in order to map a drive on that computer to a shared folder on another computer through the internet. I need to tell my router for the computer that has the shared folder to accept the NET USE command request, and send it to my computer. Trouble is that I don't know which port the NET USE command uses, I'm assuming its the same port for all cmd commands, but I can't seem to find it.

I would really appreciate help, Thanks.

Schuby


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#8
July 2, 2007 at 14:07:13

Being a noob you don't understand the risk to your system or those accessing it by what you propose.

That article you referance is incorrect AND outdated. It was written for windows 3.1, 95 and nt. You are on xp. It mentions netbeui which is says has to be installed yet netbeui is not a routable protocol and it can not travel over the internet. Bet the writer didn't know the difference between netbios and netbeui.

You appear intent on this path of accessing shared drives via the internet. Certainly is one way of gaining an education though be it the hard way.

Hopefully you don't use your pc for banking, writing checks or you will find your life in hell due to identity theft.

Imagine the power if you knew how to internet search


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#9
July 2, 2007 at 16:20:58

If you wish to be fairly secure without a full tunnel then consider barracuda server using https. You also have to NAT your local computer if it doesn't have a public IP.

http://barracudaserver.com/products...

You could consider a messenger too. Many IM's offer some file and folder sharing. With UPNP you don't even need to NAT usually.


I read it wrong and answer it wrong too. So get off my case you goober.


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