Sharing 1 Internet wire with 2 different IP's

Hewlett-packard / 3400cl
May 12, 2009 at 20:03:27
Specs: Windows Vista
Ok here is what is happening

I have 1 10Mbps ethernet connection, with 2 seperate IP's- IP1=66.xxx.xxx.xxx and 64.xxx.xxx.xxx. This one connection is hooked into 1 port on a HP 3400cl switch. I have 2 firewall devices connected to this switch, one that is the 66.x network and the other that is the 64.x network (which is the one all my standard internet traffic goes out of). When i connect them up this way my internet speed reduces to 500Kbps. Even when i remove one of the devices and just leave the internet connection and one firewall connected to this switch, the speed drops down to 500Kbps (this happens with any switch I use).

I was wondering if I should do some vlan'ing or does anyone else have any idea's.


See More: Sharing 1 Internet wire with 2 different IPs

Report •


#1
May 12, 2009 at 20:08:09
There is something wrong with your configuration. The subject line says you have one internet connection but the text mentions 2 external IP addresses.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#2
May 12, 2009 at 20:14:54
when i had just the one firewall it was able to handle my main IP and the 2 alias IP's. They have now reconfigured my circuit to allow one IP to have one gateway, and the other IP to have the other. I was able to get connectivity on both devices with their static ip's set, however my speed was reduced tremendously by connecting it to the switch (which I have to do to get them to share one wire)

Report •

#3
May 13, 2009 at 05:34:49
It goes against everything I know about networking. The only external IP address is on the internet side of the modem or modem/router. Everything else should have an internal IP address.

Modem > router > switch (if needed) > all PCs.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
May 13, 2009 at 15:08:52
Might consider a device (or computer) made to use two or more ISP connections.

"Best Practices", Event viewer, host file, perfmon, antivirus, anti-spyware, Live CD's, backups, are in my top 10


Report •

#5
May 13, 2009 at 15:25:19
It is not that uncommon to have multiple ips provided by an isp and then use a switch with routers attached to distribute those public ips to the wan interfaces of the routers.

It would look like this;
modem<>switch<>routers<>multiple lans

Not sure what your expectation is allencltnc. Were you expecting the same single pipe bandwidth on both routers?

Your switch should not slow traffic down on bit. You don't need a vlan since a switch will only send the traffic to the distination registered in its mac table. What is the result if you only have one router hookup?


Report •

#6
May 13, 2009 at 17:24:59
He doesn't have multiple IPs from his provider. I don't where he found those IPs.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#7
May 14, 2009 at 17:25:47
Ok I have finally solved this <and the fix was way too simple>

All I had to do was set the ports to the speed of 10FDx and enable flow control, and my speed was returned to normal.

By the way for those interested in how my setup is connected see below:

We have a Cisco ONS 15327 Optical Router connecting us to our provider's Fiber SONET Ring.

This is connected via a Cat5e Crossover cable into a HP 3400cl on Port 21

Then Port 1 of the HP 3400cl is Connected to our FireWalls Internet Port via Cat5e Crossover cable (It has a address of 64.xxx.xxx.xxx.)

Then Port 2 of the HP 3400cl is Connected to our VPN Appliance's Internet Port via Cat5e Crossover cable (it has a address of 66.xxx.xxx.xxx)

And all connections are working normally.



Report •

#8
May 14, 2009 at 17:53:16
That's an interesting configuration. I'm glad it's working & thanks for posting the fix.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •


Ask Question