setting up wireless for a campground

August 5, 2009 at 09:15:09
Specs: Windows XP
We own a campground and I'm trying to set up a free wifi network for our campers. I purchased a Hawking Router and a 9bi outdoor omnidirectional antannae. My range does not seem to be much further with the outdoor antannae than without. Don't know if it's due to trees or what. I don't have much experience with this, so I need some plane jane answers. Do I need more access points? Right now I only seem to be getting out about 200 feet. I need to go about 700 ft. total.

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#1
August 5, 2009 at 09:54:43
It is the trees that is casuing the problem. Trees absorb high frequency radio waves in the 2.5Ghz band far more than brick walls do becasue they contain water and water just loves these radio waves. It will be even worse when it rains. It is what makes your mictowave oven work only it is the water in the food that does it.

The best thing to do is to get the antenna as high as possible above the trees, on a mast if becessary so that you can get a more direct line of sight to the furthest point. If the antenna is down at ground level you are never going to get very far.

Stuart


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#2
August 5, 2009 at 11:01:39
Be careful of the Cone of Silence. The signals come out of the antenna in a triangle like a flash light. (This is where Flying Below the RADAR comes from.) If you raise the antenna then it increases the cone like raising a TeePea tent makes the base bigger. Make sure you mount it sideways so that the signals are directed to the ground. This is why when you see an antenna mounted on a pole it is not straight up and down but this cuts your signal strength in half.

You can decrease the cone size and get above the trees by making the antenna longer but then you run into impedance matching issues with the transmitter and unless you really know what you are doing I do not suggest this.

Also you might want to get this software for your computer...

http://www.metageek.net/products/in...

It give you a real time diagram of your signal strength so that you can walk around and watch it go up and down so that you know where the weak spots are.


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#3
August 5, 2009 at 11:38:55
Flying below the RADAR originates from the fact that RADAR uses a highly direction antennae and does radiate in a cone shape. Generally they are pointed at the sky where you tend to find most aircraft. Hence flying below the RADAR originates from the aircraft flying below the elevation of the RADAR antenna.

However, as are taking about omni-direction antennas here, none of this applies. Omni direction antennas radiate in a doughnut shape all around the antenna with the vertical antenna going the through the middle of the doughnut. The antenna should be mounted vertical so the doughnut is parallel to the ground. Anything but vertical and it won’t be omni-directional anymore.

http://www.networkcomputing.com/cha...

Stuart


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