Setting up Second Homegroup on same network

April 16, 2012 at 12:32:54
Specs: Windows 7
I recently moved in with a family who had set up a homegroup on a network. I am on the same network, but I want to create a homegroup for myself. When I click on the homegroup link, the only option I get is to join the current homegroup that was already set up. I read somewhere else if you change the network to public, go to advanced settings, then change the network back to home, it will give you the option to create a homegroup. But this did not work for me. It immediately went back to the one homegroup with the only option to join it. How do I set up a second homegroup on the same network?

See More: Setting up Second Homegroup on same network

Report •


#1
April 16, 2012 at 15:27:33
Add another router with a different sub net. Connect through that and set up your homegroup normally. You need to have a segmented network to get this to work. Why are you setting up a homegroup anyway? You would be better off setting up shares and permissions. IMHO

Report •

#2
April 16, 2012 at 15:31:12
to join or create a home workgroup you have to be set to HOME for location.
you don't need to join a homegroup.
set your location as WORK or PUBIC [even better separation] and you should be fine.
this assume you don't need to access a home group connected printer.

Gretti your answer doesn't fit the question of the OP.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#3
April 16, 2012 at 16:09:25
wanderer

There is already a homegroup on the network, that he doesn't own or want to join, so he can't create a new one.

So my answer is the correct one.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
April 16, 2012 at 16:51:33
Nothing in the OPs post indicates a homegroup is even needed.

Even if he joined the local homegroup he could secure his pc/laptop with the windows firewall denying other hosts access to his pc.

Work and Public are better options than adding a router and subnet]

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •

#5
April 16, 2012 at 17:04:04
wanderer

I realize that there is no real reason for a homegroup and he could join the other homegroup if he wanted or had permission from the owner of the homegroup. But he wanted to know how to get two homegroups on the same network.

I was just answering the question.


Report •

#6
April 16, 2012 at 22:52:31
I have a desktop with a printer hooked up. I also have a notebook and netbook that I want to have access to files and printer on my desktop. Without anyone else on the network having access to my files. So my desktop will be the "home" computer.

@Gretti, if there is a way to do this through "shares" and "permissions," then please explain further on how to do this.

@Wanderer, I tried changing to public and work, and it tells me I must set my computer to home network to create a homegroup. I go back to home network, and the only option I get is to join the homegroup that has been set up already.


Report •

#7
April 16, 2012 at 23:54:18
No problem,

Just set a password on your account, the only default folders that are shared are the public ones anyway.

Change all your computers to the same workgroup. Right click on computer go to properties, go to advanced system settings, under the "computer name" tab click the change button. Type in what ever name you like for the workgroup and restart the computer.

It is Now setup your shares, find what ever folder you want to share, right click, go to properties, and go to the sharing tab. Under advanced sharing is where you can set the permissions. The same goes for your printer.

Now if you want to find your share on the network, open "network" on any other computer find your share, click on it, put in your user name and password.

That's it


Report •

#8
April 17, 2012 at 02:56:45
First, you have to leave the current homegroup.
Therefore, click Start / Control Panel / Network and Internet.
Choose Homenetgroup and follow the instructions, to leave the current homenetgroup.
After that, you can create your own new homenetgroup and choose, what to share.

BTW, make sure, that IPv6 is enabled in the network cards configuration panel. It's absolutely needed to work with homenetgroups.


Report •

#9
April 17, 2012 at 07:30:12
I don't even know why you would mess around with workgroups for this. Unless I'm reading this completely wrong, the only requirement is to have a share (or several shares) on one PC that only specific other users in the LAN can connect to.

If I'm correct then it's a simple case of creating a share on the target PC. Then create a user account on the target for the computer(s) you wish to give access to the share. Add that account (or 'accounts' as the case may be) to the ACL, give them appropriate permissions and remove all other users and groups (except the local Administrator account) from the ACL on that share. Then only the account(s) you have added will be able to access the share.

The computer(s) you connect from will have to have an identical user account on it with the exact same username/password combination. Do not use the built in local administrator account for this but a completely separate account.

Issue resolved and all computers in the LAN can remain in the same workgroup.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#10
April 17, 2012 at 07:42:01
Many roads lead to Rome.

The main question was, how to work with an own homenetgroup, not for an alternative.


Report •

#11
April 17, 2012 at 09:57:14
Maybe......but I believe in the KISS principle and creating another workgroup isn't as easy, or as reliable.

Creating a different workgroup doesn't serve as well as my idea. Anybody with a half ounce of brains could change their workgroup to that of the "private" workgroup and in seconds have access to the share.

I've found in a lot of cases, the OP's know what it is they'ld like to do......but aren't familiar enough with the tools available to be able to say succinctly, "This is what I need". From reading this post, I suspect this person didn't know this was an option. Just like I suspect they didn't know anybody in the one workgroup could easily change the membership of their PC to the other workgroup and thus gain access to shares on the other workgroup. Giving this person what they're asking for may not be giving them what they really need.

My method prevents access to unauthorized users regardless of workgroup membership.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#12
April 17, 2012 at 10:24:48
Homenetgroup settings do provide password protected shared files and printers and it's enabled by default.
So the user must exist at that computer and everyone, who wants to access files or printers on that computer, needs the appropriate credentials.

Anyway, seems you never played with Homenetgroups.


Report •

#13
April 17, 2012 at 10:44:59
Perhaps we're speaking about two separate things then.

I thought the conversation was about "workgroup" as versus say, a domain. Is this not what the OP is asking about?

I'm not at all familiar with the term "homenetgroup"

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#14
April 17, 2012 at 10:53:58
This is in short, what HomeGroup in Windows 7 means:

Home group

A home group is a feature that allows shared disk access, shared printer access and shared scanner access among all computers and users (typically all family members) in a home, in a similar fashion as in a small office workgroup, e.g., by means of distributed peer-to-peer networking (without a central server). Additionally, a home server may be added for increased functionality.

A Windows HomeGroup is a new feature in Microsoft Windows 7 that simplifies file sharing. All users (typically all family members), except guest accounts, may access any shared library on any computer that is connected to the home group. Passwords are not required from the family members during logon. Instead, secure file sharing is possible by means of a temporary password that is used when adding a computer to the HomeGroup.

Source: Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Home_n...


Report •

#15
April 17, 2012 at 11:03:43
There you go.....I'm still using XP Pro at work and at home. While my department laptop is running Windows 7 and I have messed around with it somewhat, I've not used it for any real home networking.

I still think my method to be more secure. But then I prefer more granular control with regard to access to shares. Also, if you use my method, you can set it up so once the user on the other PC has logged on to their PC, they won't have to authenticate to access remote shares as that will have been taken care of as per my following guide:

Click on my name above in this response and read my “how-to” guide titled, “You try to connect to a share but are asked for a Username/Password

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#16
April 17, 2012 at 11:12:56
Yeah, I'm familar with WinXP file and printer sharing.
But this is for make home networking for non professionals at home much easier.
You simply need one so called Password, to get a member of the homegroup, and have access to the shared libraries, not to the whole pc.

And I can't stress enough, it's for home use !!!

At my home, I do know how uses my computers and I only share things to them, I really will share.

Another thing is, I don't use Microsoft Network at home. I use a Novell Netware server and Linux server at home to share things.


Report •

#17
April 17, 2012 at 11:24:39
@Gretti, I tried what you said... I just cannot locate my notebook from the desktop (that Im trying to share files from) when Im trying to give my notebook the permission to the share files.

@paulsep, as easy as it might sound to you, I have tried leaving the homegroup. Only to find that joining that same homegroup is my only option... not creating one. I verified that IPv6 was enabled.

@Curt, you lost me at ACL. I looked it up on the internet. I have no idea how to modify the access control list.

I appreciate everyone's help on this. I am obviously in way over my head on this. I think it would take days to figure out what I need to do to get what I want done. I have USB 3.0 on my desktop and notebook. I will just transfer the files that I need, when I need it via USB 3.0 flash. Its pretty fast. Thanks again.


Report •

#18
April 17, 2012 at 11:33:15
You might take a look at this sites on howto create HomeGroups.

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/conte...
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/9524...
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/...


Report •

#19
April 17, 2012 at 12:32:59

paulsep

Another thing is, I don't use Microsoft Network at home. I use a Novell Netware server and Linux server at home to share things.

Ahhh Novell........how I miss it! I got my CNA on Netware 3.x and it always was far superior to Windows. Which is why I guess Bill Gates copied the best features of Novell with Windows 2000 and created the "Windows Active Directory" domain.

You simply need one so called Password, to get a member of the homegroup, and have access to the shared libraries, not to the whole pc.

In my home there's just me and my wife and I have a small NAS on which we store all the important stuff. Since it's already shared out, if I want to share something with her, that's where I put it.

Prior to purchasing the NAS, I had a folder on my PC that I shared. I created a user account for her on my PC using the same credentials she uses to logon to her PC's and added it to the share as per my guide. Then when she needed something I put it in that folder and she simply mapped a drive (no username/password required thanks to the user account I'd created on my PC for her) and accessed the data.


throwingcopper33

LOL - I just had to have a quick look at my coworkers computer. Mine is still running XP Pro.

I opened "File Explorer" (might be called something different in Windows 7) and drilled down in the C: drive to view all folders on the root of C: If you do the same and pick any folder (I used "temp"), right click on it and then select "Properties" from the pull-down menu that comes up. Once that property window opens you'll see several tabs, one of which is "Sharing" and the other "Security". The "Security" tab is the NT based sharing and is what I was referring to as the ACL. The "Sharing" the one you would use to share a folder and it does some basic permissions....but the real access control is on the "Security" tab.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#20
April 17, 2012 at 12:37:23
As I finally gave up on this, I chose home as my network type and I was going to shut down.... I noticed it finally gave me an option to create a homegroup. I swear I did this 100 times, and never could get this option to come up. I noticed that the other homegroup was not available, and I think the computer in control of that homegroup shut down. SO maybe now this is why I can create one.

Unfortunately I still ran into a problem. If I use my desktop to create the homegroup, I can not get my notebook to join it. The notebook ONLY wants to create a homegroup. No option to join at all. So I left the homegroup on my desktop. Created a homegroup on my notebook. I tried to join using my desktop... and same thing. The desktop ONLY wants to create a homegroup. No option to join at all.

I thought homegroup was suppose to make things so much easier in sharing files. It has probably been about 5 years since I have been this frustrated in trying to figure something out with my computer.


Report •

#21
April 17, 2012 at 23:47:42
I figured it out. There is a computer description name and a computer name. I had different computer descprition names but the same computer name for my desktop and notebook. I changed the notebook computer name, rebooted, and it then saw the homegroup to join. To change the computer name, search "change computer name." It will pop up a window. Click "Change." And rename the computer.

Now both computers are on my homegroup and sharing files.


Report •


Ask Question