Setting up a VLAN -GE-DSS-244 Layer 2+ Switch

March 22, 2011 at 12:45:19
Specs: Windows Vista
I am migrating an a group of workstations that run a fire system from one software to another. The current workstations run the following info:

123.123.123.xxx
255.255.255.0

The new workstations run:

100.100.100.xxx
255.255.255.0

There is a central switch location using a GE-DSG-244 Layer 2+ Managed switch. There are two remote location using GE-DS-82 Managed Switches.

The two networks must remain isolated, yet use the same fiber communications. The central switch connects to the two location using MM Fiber.

From my research I believe I need to use the 802.1q standard to allow port trunking between the two switches.

I have tried this over and over, and it is not working. Help and Thanks


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#1
March 22, 2011 at 13:53:35
Your port trunking guess would be correct but what does this have to do with the ip change?

You shouldn't have changed anything on the switches. The change is in ip which will depend on layer3 device/dhcp server/static assigned ips.

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


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#2
March 22, 2011 at 13:55:54
Continuing research and learning new as I do. To verify what you are saying, the IP address ranges you are using don't matter. Once you set up the VLAN, any IP address in the same range will talk, regardless of the switch settings, is that correct?

From what I can see, the only time the IP of the switch matters is if you are setting up a Management VLAN.


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#3
March 22, 2011 at 13:57:33
BTW, the two systems need to run at the same time. When we built the new system, we gave it a different IP range. It didn't have to change. Once the changeover to the new software is complete, the old workstations will be packaged up and turned in, and the VLAN's will be removed. The primary reason for all this is the lack of additional fibers to run the two networks separately..

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#4
March 23, 2011 at 07:29:23
From what I can see, the only time the IP of the switch matters is if you are setting up a Management VLAN.

Dude, if you're using VLAN's, you should be using VLAN 1 as your management VLAN. All network appliances, and ONLY network appliances (routers, switches, etc) should reside on that VLAN.

The only time I would ever consider setting up a switch any other way would be if it's a standalone switch for a single subnet. Then you just leave it set to the default, which is to say, VLAN 1 on all ports and no other VLAN's configured. Even in the case of a single subnet and single VLAN, you should still have an IP address assigned to the switch. If you don't, how the heck do you remote into it to make changes? That's not even taking into consideration switches in remote locations.

I have well over 100 switches in my environment. Most of which reside here at our main site within our main geographical location. I can't imagine having to run to individual closets with a laptop and console cable to make changes to a switch.

Who set your network up? Whoever it was obviously didn't know what they were doing. I highly recommend you hire a qualified consultant to help you out as you don't really seem to know what you're doing either and attempting to do something you're not qualified to do is a recipe for disaster.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
March 23, 2011 at 09:30:13
And Curt, I was really hoping you wouldn't reply to my response, I was looking for someone to help, and from every other post I've read from you, you are smug and condescending to those of us who are trying to learn. Please do not reply any more on this thread.

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#6
March 23, 2011 at 09:59:05
In further reply, to others who would like to help, this is a temporary fix due to lack of fibers. I have not had to do a VLAN in the past, and as this is a GE switch there's not a lot of documentation out there. This will eventually be a simple flat network. Yes, I am new and I am just learning how to do all of this. It would be silly and a waste of money to hire a qualified person to come in and do this. Not only would I not be trained, the VLAN will only be setup for about two weeks and then we go to the flat network. I simply need some direction on the best way to set this up during the migration so both networks will run on one fiber pair, between different sets of switches. I have an understanding of networks, basic though it may be, and am sure with some good advice this will be a no brainer.

I am sorry to Curt for the abrupt response, but I read through quite a few of the "setting up a vlan" posts on this site, and it seems at every turn he is nicely telling someone they are an idiot. I am sorry Curt, that I don't have your breadth of knowledge, but that is the point of forums like this, TO LEARN If I was a qualified expert who already knew how to do this, I wouldn't be asking on this forum, right??


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#7
March 23, 2011 at 10:00:36
1 + 1 always = 2

1- I said, "Who set your network up? Whoever it was obviously didn't know what they were doing.

+

1 - You got all defensive about my response and became rude.

= 2 - you set up your network yourself.

I wasn't condescending or smug to you. If I have been to others in the past it's because they were rude to me first. You got your wish, I won't try to help you. I suspect that anybody else who hangs here and knows about VLAN's probably won't help you either since they will have concluded they same thing I did (ie: you don't know what you're doing) and therefore won't be likely to try and help you and risk a childish and rude response like the one you just gave me when I tried to actually help you.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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