salaries in networking field??

January 21, 2013 at 03:11:22
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im very much interested in networking ..but some of them are saying there is no growth in it and you cant earn money compared to programers and developers . im just starting my career so im bit confused ..can anyone help me with this?

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#1
January 21, 2013 at 07:15:02
I suspect how much one earns is going to depend on a lot of different factors and you are best off to do some basic research on job opportunities in the different fields in your area and see what the scale is for each.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
January 21, 2013 at 08:05:26
I think it's better to go with what you enjoy, and what you are good at, rather than worrying too much about the money. Both fields can command very good salaries, and you are more likely to progress in the field you are good at.

Don't forget that whatever career path you chose it won't last you for life. Suppose you were retiring now at 65; look back 45 years to when you were 20 - how many of the skills that are in demand now existed then?


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#3
January 21, 2013 at 09:19:51
I couldn't agree with ijack more, and should have thought to post that myself.

Do what you enjoy most.

I spent all of they 80's and the early part of the 90's trying to find somerthing I enjoy and frequently ended up doing something I didn't like much. Then I found computers. Since getting involved with them, I discovered almost 8 years ago when I took this position that I really enjoy enterprise networking. Enough so that I've passed on a couple chances to get paid more to do something else.

I've been in a position where I had to do something I didn't like in order to keep a roof over my head and put bread on the table. Given the choice, I'd much rather do something I truly enjoy for a little less money than doing something I didn't like as much for more.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
January 22, 2013 at 10:15:21
you are right..but many are saying that in networking field one cant get over 70k per month ..is that true? but in programing they may get more than a lakh per month

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#5
January 22, 2013 at 12:23:36
you are right..but many are saying that in networking field one cant get over 70k per month

Did you perhaps mean "70k per year"? I suspect so.

First, do some research by looking at job offers in your area. Don't rely on what somebody told you. I can tell you I make 250k a year. That doesn't make it true (it's not). Doing your own research like I advised you is the only way to form an accurate idea of what average salaries in your area are.

I know of no programmers who make over 100k a year and there are at least 10 working where I work. I know what each of them makes and it's not above 90k a year.

Their direct bosses, the supervisors of the departments they work in are making around 100k a year. If I'm not misaken, either just under 100k a year or 100k on the nose. It's worth mentioning, those supervisors are people with a minium of a university degree and around 10 years experience in the field. The programming positions require a degree and 5 years experience.

This is western Canada. The same jobs could pay more, or less, in a different area of Canada and most certainly will in the US and other parts of the world.

Also keep in mind, nobody starts at the top. You have to work your way up. While the maximum pay for a position may well be 100k a year, you're probably starting around 50k a year and it'll take you 10 to 15 years working in the same place to get up to the maximum.

How much you make is also relevant to where you live. Wages here in Canada tend to be higher than in the US. Mind you, so is the cost of living so there's your trade off. On a direct comparison though, I would suspect they'd work out to about the same all things considered.

All that aside. If you have what it takes to be a programmer but don't enjoy the work, it doesn't matter how much you make, you're going to find over time that you hate your job and likely, hate your life too.

Trust me on this, it's better to earn a little less and be happy than to earn more and not be.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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