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Solved routing over different network printer

January 28, 2013 at 21:06:57
Specs: Windows 7

I have one router (A) (192.168.0.xxx) that serves as internet gateway. Another two routers (B & C) (192.168.1.xxx & 192.168.2.xxx) that serves two sub-net/network, are connected to this router (A). How can I set it up so that PCs in sub-net C are able to print to network printers in sub-net B? Pls note that I do not have full control over router A.



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✔ Best Answer
January 30, 2013 at 08:31:42

Your setup provides no security between the guest and business lans. Different subnets do not provide security. You further compromise the business lan by adding routes and sharing the printers with the guest network.

Instead of routers you should have put in a single managed switch and used vlans to secure your traffic

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#1
January 29, 2013 at 08:05:06

How exactly are B&C connected?

Are they both plugged into LAN ports on A, or is C daisychained to B?

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
January 29, 2013 at 09:56:32

Both B & C are connected directly into LAN ports of A.

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#3
January 29, 2013 at 10:09:07

Then router A has no effect. It is just a switch as far as you are concerned.

You need to add static routes on B to C and on C to B.

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#4
January 29, 2013 at 10:28:52

If you don't want the computers in B&C to be able to access each other directly, then you should move the printer and attach it to A. That would make it accessible to B&C without given B access to C, and C access to B.

If you're not concerned about B&C accessing each other then having separate subnets behind separate routers is moot and you should just buy a switch, plug it into A and connect everybody to it.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#5
January 29, 2013 at 12:55:56

Excellent suggestion CurtR !

as;kdflakdfsadjkf for filler space

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#6
January 30, 2013 at 00:29:28

Thanks for your replies.

Actually B is the office LAN and C is WIFI setup for guests to access the internet but I also want to allow them to print to printers in the office LAN.

A is managed by a third party and our routers are connected to it for the sole purpose of internet connection. To attach printers to A is not an option for me.


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#7
January 30, 2013 at 07:10:56

Bummer!

Ok, to keep it simple since you don't seem to require separate subnets, I would keep one router that is wireless capable and I would connect it to router A. Then all your stuff is one one single subnet and access to printers is available to all clients in your LAN.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#8
January 30, 2013 at 08:31:42
✔ Best Answer

Your setup provides no security between the guest and business lans. Different subnets do not provide security. You further compromise the business lan by adding routes and sharing the printers with the guest network.

Instead of routers you should have put in a single managed switch and used vlans to secure your traffic

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


Report •


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