Articles

pinout for cat5

July 28, 2010 at 07:55:26
Specs: Windows Server 2003, cat5

What is the pinout for a phone line using cat5 cable and a rj45 connector? Any help will be appreciated.

See More: pinout for cat5

Report •


#1
July 28, 2010 at 08:04:24

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=pinout+for+cat5


Try the first link, it'll explain the standards and give you pictures.


Report •

#2
July 28, 2010 at 09:07:53

There is no pinout for phone line and rj45 [lan].

You would use one pair and connect a rj11 [phone] connector


Report •

#3
July 28, 2010 at 10:04:59

We frequently use RJ-45 outlets for phones.

If you look at the A and B standards for wiring network cables you'll notice the middle wires are the Blue, Blue/White pair.

If you plug an RJ-11 phone plug into an RJ-45 outlet, you'll notice it fits right in the middle of the RJ-45 lining the single pair of telephone wires up with the blue pair in the Network outlet.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
July 28, 2010 at 12:00:54

Now THAT is a cool trick CurtR, though I would never tell my phone guys that [cuz I want mine wired right :-)]

Report •

#5
July 28, 2010 at 15:15:57

T568A wiring scheme is often used for 2 line phone systems in commercial installations, but the official standard for phones is USOC 1, 2, 3, or 4pr. The 4pr USOC obviously uses an RJ45 jack/plug, 3pr uses RJ14, 1 and 2 pair uses RJ11.

The pairs are:
line 1 - pins 4,5 - blue pair
line 2 - pins 3,6 - orange pair
line 3 - pins 2,7 - green pair
line 4 - pins 1,8 - brown pair


Report •

#6
July 28, 2010 at 15:30:57

I should have noted that the reason that T586A is often used in commercial installations is to allow the freedom to use it for either network or 2 line phone systems.

Telco companies will probably use the USOC scheme, but networking companies will often terminate outlets with T568A and leave it up to the customer to choose which type of patch cable (phone or lan) they need to use.


Report •

#7
July 29, 2010 at 05:28:33

Now THAT is a cool trick CurtR, though I would never tell my phone guys that [cuz I want mine wired right :-)]

wanderer

We have been using Cat5e for phones as well since it gives you 4 phone lines (4 pairs) per cable. Typically, when punching them to the BIX block we use the colored order FishMonger described (blue, orange, green, brown)

So the first phone line is always the blue pair.....which matches up nicely with the blue pair in a RJ-45 outlet when you plug the RJ-11 jack into it.

Another handy thing our Telecom technician came up with is a BIX block that comes with RJ-45 outlets attached. We use those in conjunction with VoIP. You punch it in the closet next to your normal BIX block and near the patch panels for the network stuff. Then, when a user requires an analog line in their office (for a fax or modem) you just punch the connection to the BIX block that's connected to an RJ-45 outlet and jumper a patch cable from the BIX RJ-45 to the appropriate port in the patch panel and then plug the RJ-11 for the fax/modem at the other end and you're done.

If your telco guys aren't familiar with this, the following link show's an image of what I'm talking about (click on the image to make it bigger):

BIX/RJ-45 block

The ones we typically use are a single BIX with 8 or 12 RJ-45's connected to it.

FishMonger

The blue pair retains the exact same position in both the A and B standard. Which is to say, the middle two pins of the eight total.

This is true of course unless you're punching a crossover for 1000 Mbps bandwidth in which case all 4 pairs are reversed instead of just the orange/green pair.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#8
July 31, 2010 at 20:20:37

Curt

I don't monitor this forum as much as I used to so at times I'm a little slow to respond.

I am very aware that the blue pair retains it's position in A & B, but if you want to stay within the (color code) standards for both network and 2 line phone, then, as you know, 568A is the proper standard.

I too work with VoIP connections in our company and am the lead person in the build and migration from standard centrex lines to our Asterisk servers with both PRI and SIP trunks.

I've used the 110 cross connects that you linked to, but in most cases I prefer to use patch panels because they work much better in racks. We do use similar 110 blocks at our T1 NIU smart jack termination blocks for our PRI trunks.


Report •

#9
August 1, 2010 at 05:36:45

then, as you know, 568A is the proper standard.

Actually, I didn't know that.......lol.

We use the A standard at work all the time but I wasn't aware there was any right/wrong way to do the cabling with regard to plugging a telephone into an RJ-45 outlet. So I guess it's lucky we use the A standard.

I'm a network guy. I don't know much of anything about the telecom side of things. If someone gives me the TN's, I can do basic moves or new connections but that's about it for me. I would love to learn more though and hope to do some crosstraining.

I guess it's lucky we use the A standard at work. Thanks for the input, it's good to know.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •

#10
August 1, 2010 at 07:19:39

Curt,

Here's another little piece of info that all network people should know, but often don't.

Q. How does a (good) network cable tester know that you used the wrong pairs for a given standard?

A. Each pair has a different number of twists per inch which gives each pair a different amount of resistance that the tester measures.


Report •

#11
August 2, 2010 at 05:42:45

That I knew having pulled, tested, and certified many cables. Also, due to the differing number of twists per inch, the individual pairs are never exactly the same length so that also tells you which is which.

We have a couple of testers which test/certify. They ID the wires for you based on resistance. So even if you don't know the above, you can't mess them up.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


Report •


Ask Question