Patch Panel System

May 22, 2009 at 05:28:33
Specs: Windows XP, 2GB
Hi Everyone.

I am wondering if you all could help me on a job i have took on.

A hotel wants internet, a wireless system & has cat5 sockets in each floor (in the riser) all these sockets have already been run by another company into the comms room located in the basement.

Unfortunately, none of the wiring has been mapped yet, so a lot of running up & down for me soon! besides that, all cables have been run into the patch panel from upstairs but as this patch panel is new to me i am wondering what happenes next??

Do i need a switch, router etc? At the moment, Virgin Media cable box is just sitting there under the patch panel installed waiting to be connected to something. Am i right if i come to believe the modem will connect into the router and the router will connect just into 1 spare port in the patch panel?

Please excuse my limited knowledge, i took this job on for the challenge so i can happily say in years to come i wasnt scared to try something.

Thank You in advance for all your responses. :)


See More: Patch Panel System

Report •


#1
May 22, 2009 at 06:47:43
You need a switch.

Connect the modem to the WAN interface of the router, then connect 1 of the routers LAN ports as well as all of the patch panel ports to the switch with short network patch cables.


Report •

#2
May 22, 2009 at 07:55:24
Hopefully whomever did the cabling was smart enough to label the patch panel and the outlets. If not, you might need a tone generator to trace out which outlets run to which port on the patch panel. Just to give you an idea what I'm talking about, click on this link to see an example of what I'm talking about

I believe I detailed out proper setup for you on your last post on this topic. Feel free to refer back to it for that info.


Report •

#3
May 22, 2009 at 08:43:35
Hi, thanks for your replies.

Unlucky for me the guy who run all cables etc didnt label anything, all i have got to work with is what connections on the front of the patch panel are empty & that have been run from behind, but still making sure is a long process.

One thing i wanted to ask you guys is that on this patch panel there are lots of other connection going through it to the officserv 7200. Could i still use this patch panel and connect them to the switch?

I am going to put wireless access points on each floor where the sockets are connected to the riser on each floor. Which switch & AP's would you recommend. unmanaged or managed?

Tone Generator, i will look into that thanks. If it makes life easier then i will have to purchase one.

Im sure there was something else i needed to ask you guys, i wrote a big response then my electricity decides it wants to turn off.. Annoying.

For the kind of system i am going to install, is there anything you recommend i should & shouldnt do - even though this is my first large job it would be great to know my errors even before i make them.


Thank You Again.



Report •

Related Solutions

#4
May 22, 2009 at 15:29:20
One thing i wanted to ask you guys is that on this patch panel there are lots of other connection going through it to the officserv 7200. Could i still use this patch panel and connect them to the switch?

In a word, yes.

In fact, that' s how it should be done. You should have your external connection running directly into your router (if I remember correctly, the officserv unit is a router/firewall/wireless) and then from the officserv you would run a cable into the switch. This way, with all other clients plugged into the switch, they can access the internet.

I am going to put wireless access points on each floor where the sockets are connected to the riser on each floor. Which switch & AP's would you recommend. unmanaged or managed?

I would recommend a managed switch if you have the budget for it. They are, as you can imagine, more expensive than unmanaged switches. However, you may not need a managed switch so whether you buy managed or unmanaged is going to depend on your budget and needs and only you can decide which way to go.

As for the AP's that would depend again on need. You want to get something powerful enough to give you complete coverage over the entire floor. If you can't find a single one to do the trick, then you'll need two strategically located on each floor to give you full coverage. I haven't checked lately but the 802.11n is almost standardized. It's worth finding out if it is because if it is, I would go N. If not, stick with B./G.

Recommendations:

1) UPS......UPS..........UPS!!!!!

- you want to make sure all sensitive equipment, which is to say, your switch, router etc is all protected by a UPS or more than one depending on need. I highly recommend APC

2) If you can afford a PoE (power over ethernet) capable switch, then it would be worth getting one and buying PoE capable AP's. Then you never need to worry about putting the AP near a plug in or having exposed adapters/plugs etc. No worries if you can't fit PoE in the budget as they do make "power injectors" I have experience with D-Link 2200 AP's which all came with PoE injectors.........however, I DO NOT recommend these units as I've found them to be very unreliable.

3) Wireless security - use it! Even if you put in a password like "password" (I don't recommend that one myself, too obvious) for your encryption key, having the wireless network encrypted will keep out casual war drivers. It's easy enough to give each guest the password when they sign in, or, have it on the "how to connect to our wireless network" guide in each room.



Report •

#5
May 26, 2009 at 02:18:58
Hello Curt, thank you for taking your time to respond to my question.

Your information helped a lot. Im not going to touch the officeserv 7200 as if any external company touches it the warranty of service automatically voids, plus! i don't have any access details for the system.

Im after this Net-gear pro-safe switch, what you think?

http://www.misco.co.uk/applications...

And these AP's:

http://www.misco.co.uk/applications...

Maybe something cheaper in that range, but i will have to see how the client takes the price!

Everywhere i have been looking ive noticed, with this kind of system they use a Pro-Safe VPN firewall which is connected to the AP. You can see the diagram on the website i gave you above.

Each Access Point will be connected to the switch, how do i go about configuring these individually, they will all have the same default gateway & sub-net mask correct? i've never worked with access points or switches before so bare with me :).

Thanks Again.


Report •

#6
May 26, 2009 at 07:54:18
To be honest, I've never played with any NetGear equipment so I can't really comment on it. I use enterprise level switches here at work. They are high density (48 port) managed Nortel Baystack 5510/20 and they run around $5,000.00 per unit.

I've worked with quite a few different Cisco managed switches as well.

If your environment is large enough to require managed switches (which is to say, you may need to do VLAN'ing) then by all means, get managed switches. If it's a smaller environment, then you may not need to go to the expense.

I see nothing wrong with your choices and if they fit your needs, and budget, then by all means go for it. One thing to remember when buying a switch. Keep 'future expansion' in mind. If you have 10 users and you buy a 16 port switch, you can only add another 6 users and then you're buying another switch. So if it were me, and I had 10 users, I'd get a 24 port switch.

I've tried several different AP's here at work. I've finally settled on Linksys WRT54GL wireless SOHO routers. I put a 3'd party firmware on them (Tomato) and set them up solely as an AP (ie: they don't do NAT or DHCP or any firewalling). I find they work quite well for our present needs and will have to do until I can get our enterprise level wireless project initiated.

We use the above AP's to provide in-house wireless. It's unencrypted and has no internal connectivity at all. The only access users can get is internet access. For staff this means they have to connect to the wireless, then VPN back in to connect to internal resources.

I have a separate Class C (192.168.0.0/24) subnet for this wireless connection. The IP's for the AP's are hardcoded into the AP's and are outside the DHCP scope. The DHCP server (you could use a SOHO router for this if you have one) gives out IP's to the clients that connect wirelessly.

Our setup is convoluted. If your's is going to be a strictly internal wireless network, then you'll want to use the highest encryption possible on the SID and will of course password protect it so not just anybody can connect (as is the case with our in-house WLAN at present). In this case, yes, all clients would have the same gateway IP as the actual AP's themselves would have.


Report •

#7
May 26, 2009 at 10:34:37
Hi Again Curt & Thanks.

I see, i think i will quote him for a 24 port switch then, just incase he ever wants to move places etc.

The whole system that he wants does cut corners as he wants to save cost. I mentioned to use the existing run CAT5 which is in every room of the hotel & let them connect directly this way if in future they ever wanted to incorporate a billing system they can easily do so & monitor everyone who is connected.

The client just wants everyone in the hotel to have the wireless ability, just the recpetion will be connected directly from the comms room (into the switch) and from basement to 5th floor AP's will be either on the ceiling or inside the riser cupboard, then the clients can connect like this.

Upon installing the AP's if they are going to be located on every floor is it just as simple as 'plug n play' i do understand they will have different ip address's given via DHCP of the router/switch? and if i point each AP to the same gateway i.e. 192.168.1.1 then all internet access will be signalled wirelessley to the clients rooms?

Curt if i can some way in the future repay you for your kind advice i will do, just as soon as i reach the same level as bill gates :P

I'm going to order the system tomorrow. So i will be looking for a final decision tonight. Also, the hotel has only 77 Rooms.

Any other things you think i would need to know before i start ordering & when it comes to installation.


Thank You!


Report •

#8
May 26, 2009 at 12:16:54
Upon installing the AP's if they are going to be located on every floor is it just as simple as 'plug n play'

When setup correctly, yes. You'll plug them in and power them up and they'll work.

i do understand they will have different ip address's given via DHCP of the router/switch?

I would statically assign the TCP/IP information to the AP's. Most SOHO level routers by default have a DHCP scope of 100 to 200. For example:

Router:
LAN IP: 192.168.0.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.

DHCP scope
192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.200

If you have 5 floors on the hotel and require two AP's per floor, the first AP (and I'd label and name it, "AP1") would have the following TCP/IP information applied to it manually (ie: statically assigned):

AP1
Address: 192.168.0.201
SM: 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 192.168.0.1

AP2 would be as follows:
Address: 192.168.0.202
SM: 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 192.168.0.1

AP3:
Address: 192.168.0.203
etc
etc
etc

Notice the IP's used on the AP's are outside of the DHCP scope. This avoids all possibility of duplicate IP's on the network.

and if i point each AP to the same gateway i.e. 192.168.1.1 then all internet access will be signalled wirelessley to the clients rooms?

Correct.

The clients will get their TCP/IP information from the DHCP server through the AP. As long as all DHCP settings are configured correctly, then it will work properly.

Curt if i can some way in the future repay you for your kind advice i will do, just as soon as i reach the same level as bill gates :P

LOL - thanks!

I could use a couple mill anytime you have it to spare.

The only other things I can think of would be..........if you buy AP's that are PoE (power over ethernet) capable, and a switch that can provide PoE, then you wouldn't have to worry about having a power outlet near enough your AP location to be able to plug the AP's adapter in.

If you have power easily at hand to your AP locations, I wouldn't worry about it as PoE is slightly more expensive.

Alternatively, you could buy power injectors for PoE and PoE capable AP's and would then not need a PoE capable switch.

Don't forget security on your wireless signal and don't give guests access to internal resources reserved for staff.


Report •


Ask Question