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Solved No RDT connection with XP Pro Laptop thru WiFi networking

February 6, 2013 at 21:43:45
Specs: Windows XP, Intel M 2.0 GB


Laptop with Windows XP Pro, connected to the network via Wifi, and set up as a remote desktop host. Can not establish a remote desktop connection with this laptop. Log-in screen is presented, but the desktop never appears on the client machine. Connecting the subject laptop via an Ethernet cable, cures the problem, and the connection succeeds, so we can rule out problems with RDT configuration, firewalls, and third party software. The laptop is a Dell D610, with a Dell 1370 WiFi built in. It has been configured so Windows manages the connections.



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#1
February 7, 2013 at 07:34:57

Connecting the subject laptop via an Ethernet cable, cures the problem, and the connection succeeds, so we can rule out problems with RDT configuration, firewalls, and third party software.

Well, you've troubleshot this issue down to the culprit so now you know what to do. Leave the laptop plugged in to the network and forget wireless. I'm not even mildly surprised to find out this issue is related to the laptop being connected wirelessly.

I've said the following before, and I'm so sure I'll be saying it again (and again, and again...) that I'm going to have to save it in a document so I can just cut/paste in the future.

Compared to a wired network connection, wireless sucks. It can never perform as well because of it's inherent susceptibility to lag and latency. So, if you plan on doing anything bandwidth intensive, video streaming, downloading big files, running an adobe connect session etc etc etc, don't expect it to perform as well as a wired connection.

I'm an avid gamer and a few years back while playing an FPS one of my friends (we connected to Team Speak so we could talk while playing) mentioned his game was running poorly. It was slow and locking up. I asked him how he was connected. He said he was connected wirelessly to the router sitting on his desk. That put the router about 3 feet (1 m) from his computer. Your signal just can't get any stronger than that. And, he was the only person connected to the LAN and using it at that time. I told him to kill the wireless interface and plug in with the wired. Within 5 minutes he was telling me, "This is great! It's working way better now"

That's wireless for you. The game we were playing was older and didn't transfer much data so that had nothing to do with his issue. It was the wireless.

Wireless is a convenience and nothing more. It's potentially possible that some day in the future we may be able to develope a wireless solution that doesn't suffer from the same lag/latency issues our present technology does.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
February 7, 2013 at 12:02:46
✔ Best Answer

Well, I share your contempt for wireless, but there are times that it is an indispensable solution - so long as you respect its bandwidth limitations. As it happens, there is a solution to this problem - found via a URL contained in a response to this forum. Here is the link, and solution:

http://www.techrepublic.com/forum/q...

Had the same problem, now fixed
I've had this problem ever since getting a new laptop from work. I tried RDP on my home network from an XP machine, or from 2 android devices like i had been able to do previously. The new machine is a windows 7 64 bit laptop. Whenever i would connect via RDP over wireless as soon as I logged in the wireless connection would drop. Confirmed this via pings to and from the remote machine.

I connected the laptop to a wired connection and RDP'd to the IP address i assigned to wired interface and got in without a problem. I then noticed that the wifi had dropped like it had previously. I relaunched the wifi connection from within the RDP session and was prompted for my network's security key. I thought this was strange since my user profile already had that saved. Once I entered the key I was able to connect to wifi. I disconnected the wired ethernet connection, and then successfully connected via RDP to the wireless ip address for the first time! Looks like something must be different with a RDP user profile and one locally logged in. The remote profile didn't have the wifi security key saved and explains why when switching to this user would kill the connection. .dgibb2000 1st Sep 2011

Thanks - and for casual surfing (most users) WiFi connections present no bottle-neck.


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#3
February 7, 2013 at 12:24:17

I don't feel contempt for wireless....as you said, it's good for casual surfing. I'm not keen on it's inherent insecurity but for casual surfing it's just fine. I do agree that there are times it's the the right way to go as long as one remembers it's limitations.

I'm quoting your quote for clarity:

Looks like something must be different with a RDP user profile and one locally logged in. The remote profile didn't have the wifi security key saved and explains why when switching to this user would kill the connection. .dgibb2000 1st Sep 2011

I wasn't aware of this...and it makes perfect sense.

I've copied your last post, and the included link and saved it in a text file so that if I ever run into a someone in a similar situation, I can quickly refer to it and pass that along to whomever is having a similar issue. That's assuming they don't use the search function and find this post and answer their own question first. Along that vein, I'm going to mark your last post as "best answer" because that is the solution.

Thanks

Thanks right back at you for posting the fix. As I said, this could very easily help someone else out.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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