Looking for a router that does not use power!

March 27, 2011 at 08:09:53
Specs: Windows XP
i live in a four story house and am looking to connect to the house with LAN connection. All the rooms have internet connections in the wall but the rooms upstairs are not connected to the point of entry on the first floor. I have bought routers to connect the different floors to each other and so on. But the second and third floor boxes with all the wires in them does not have a power outlet and the house i live in is brand new and is made of cement, and i have no desire to drill holes in the walls in the hallways or run ugly wires down the stairs or outside doors. So my question is; can i buy router that will connect 1 input to 3 output router that does not require an source of power. I have one that is just 1 to 1 now but i need a 1 to 3. If you could help me in this in anyway or just tell me no. It will all be useful. Thanks for your time in this before hand.

Jabba Taiwan

edited by moderator: Email Address removed to prevent Spam


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#1
March 27, 2011 at 09:42:01
There is no such thing. Even a simple device like a Switch requires power. A router is more complicated and cannot work without power. That goes for all electronic devices.

Stuart


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#2
March 27, 2011 at 09:48:15
What about Power over Ethernet? Something like this for example.

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#3
March 27, 2011 at 13:26:15
How are the ethernet cables installed?. In conduit?

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Related Solutions

#4
March 28, 2011 at 06:46:35
ijack

your post makes no sence at all
PoE isnt for that

all text needs typos. There there for the reader to find,to distract them from the total lack of content.
google it! wasnt the answer to the question i asked so dont be dense and give me that repl


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#5
March 28, 2011 at 11:53:27
Elucidate. What is Power over Ethernet used for if not to provide power to devices over an ethernet cable?

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#6
March 30, 2011 at 08:42:21

its used for end devices such as ip phones/cameras and the switches provide the power to the device. they switches in the network have special PoE ports that sence whats on the end and adjust the voltages acrodingly during the start up of the port. They also have a larger PSU to acomidate the end devices
this allows the placment of the devices to be put where there is no power outlet and it simplifies the placment.

all text needs typos. There there for the reader to find,to distract them from the total lack of content.
google it! wasnt the answer to the question i asked so dont be dense and give me that repl


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#7
March 30, 2011 at 09:23:08
Well the device that I linked to provides power for any remote device. So why couldn't that remote device be a small switch? (I think that's what the OP needs rather than a router.) It doesn't have to be a specific POE switch as long as it can get enough power from the POE device.

In fact, if you do a bit of Googling you can easily find POE switches with 5 ports (the remote end, so powered by POE, not the host switch that provides the power). Sounds like what the OP needs to me.


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#8
March 30, 2011 at 10:18:43
You can only use POE devices with POE.

OP would need a POE router.

You can not use a regular router that uses a transformer to go from AC to 12v DC [USA].

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
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#9
March 30, 2011 at 10:41:36
Obviously the OP would have to buy a POE router to push power to the remote devices. I was taking that as a given. But if it's the only answer then it's the only answer.

I was just taking issue with the assertion that there is no such thing as a router (or more probably a switch) that needs a local power supply. There's always a way. And I'm not sure that my original post on the subject "makes no sence at all". I'm not even sure that it "makes no sense".


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#10
March 30, 2011 at 12:13:03
ijack the only device that provides poe power is a poe switch that I am aware of.

what you proposed was not a viable option since you can't take the poe device you linked to and have it supply the correct voltage to a non poe router.

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#11
March 30, 2011 at 12:42:30
The manual says that it can be used to provide 5V power to any standard network device. Of course you would need a POE switch at the local end to power it. But I've never used this particular bit of kit, so I'll bow to your experience.

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#12
March 30, 2011 at 13:02:43
What I think the OP really needs is PoE Access Points. They do make PoE WAPs which may just do the job for him. The problem is like Wanderer said is that when you start installing PoE devices you have to upgrade your switches because only having a PoE router will not do it because the DC power will be stopped once connected to a non-PoE switch. Some things the OP will have to consider but it may be cheaper to upgrade the switches than to have Power Polls installed. Also, I think some one mentioned it that your cables no longer fall under low voltage IBC codes and you may have to rerun them in conduit or EMT. Good luck with this project.

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#13
March 30, 2011 at 13:09:38
Just so you guys know, you can use PoE injectors if you don't have a PoE switch.

I'm sitting here at my desk looking at a D-Link DWL-2200 AP that is a PoE device. They come with their own injectors.

For the most part, when possible, we plug those into a PoE capable switch but there are a couple instances where it hasn't been possible and I've used the injectors. I've also used an injector from the D-Link WAP to provide electricity to another PoE capable device (a VoIP phone) from a different manufacturer.

You can also buy rack mountable PoE injectors. It's been a while since I looked at one but I believe they come various sizes (ie: 12, 24, 48 ijector ports)

I do not believe anybody makes PoE routers. Which is to say, routers that you can use PoE to provide electricity to them. At least, I've never seen one. But, you might be able to buy a PoE switch which would work in this case if combined wtih an injector at the other end of the line.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#14
March 30, 2011 at 13:26:02
So it may be a possibility worth considering? I like to consider all options when looking at a problem, however unlikely they may initially appear.

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#15
March 30, 2011 at 15:26:07
"5V power "
routers are usually 12v

They make way more access points poe then routers that is for sure
http://www.nextag.com/poe-router/st...

yep forgot about injectors and splitters

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How to properly post a question:
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#16
March 30, 2011 at 23:05:02
I believe there are 12V versions of similar devices. And I still think the OP needs remote switches, not routers.

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