Local connect Windows - Linux machines

June 22, 2010 at 02:51:17
Specs: Windows 7 - Ubuntu 10.04
Hi,
I have a Linux tablet, WiFi enabled, that being the only access to it. I know its MAC address that I can capture when I bring the device under the control area of a WiFi router. If I go to the router's admin console I can get it's assigned (DHCP) IP address that I can then use to launch a Putty in a Windows computer managed by the same WiFi router. In this way I can "go" into the Linux tablet through Putty. Is there any way that I can set-up a direct connection - always WiFi - from the Windows 7 computer into the Linux tablet without using the WiFi router? Thanks

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#1
June 22, 2010 at 05:16:45
I use Putty all the time. As far as I know, you have to go through the router no matter what.

However, you can make things a little easier by giving the Linux box a static IP address. Once you open the ssh connection with Putty, it will stay connected until you disconnect.

I have ssh connections opened to Ubuntu & FreeBSD. The only time I have to reconnect is when I need to reboot.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
June 22, 2010 at 05:32:27
Thanks!
My question is just on how setting-up a WIFI CONNECTION from Windows machine THROUGH the initial use of the Linux machine MAC address.
In theory is possible since I can set-up a WiFi network without router, but the MAC stuff is tricky ...

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#3
June 22, 2010 at 07:17:10
In theory is possible since I can set-up a WiFi network without router, but the MAC stuff is tricky ...

Sorry, you can't connect via MAC address.

Network clients communicate with each other via the IP address, not the MAC address.

You could setup an ad-hoc (google that for more info) wireless network between the two, not using the router, but it would still require both units to have an IP address.

If I go to the router's admin console I can get it's assigned (DHCP) IP address that I can then use to launch a Putty in a Windows computer managed by the same WiFi router. In this way I can "go" into the Linux tablet through Putty.

Alternatively, you could statically assign an IP to the Linux client (so the IP never changes) and then just save a profile in putty that connects to that IP address.



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Related Solutions

#4
June 22, 2010 at 08:38:26
Thanks Curt.
Again, my issue is not related to Putty or usual WiFi networking. It may not even be possible (see hereafter).
The use case that I've started from, and which works, is the following: when the Linux machine is powered up the WiFi router sniffer detects it, reads its MAC address - that can be seen on the router's admin console - and it assigns it an IP address (forgot to say the Linux machine is not configured to have a fix IP assigned). I read this IP address through the router's console (from the Windows machine) and then use it for Putty etc.
My question was, since I can set-up and ad-hoc WiFi network without a router, if there is in the Windows (7 in the case) an "admin console" working in the same way as the router's one. In fact is a Windows 7 question, just that.
For the rest, both you and quapo are right in what you write. Thanks a lot for your time!

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#5
June 22, 2010 at 10:38:43
I guess I'm misunderstanding you and what you're trying to achieve.

Leaving the Linux box as a DHCP client and having to then check in the router's management interface to see what the Linux box's IP address is every time you wish to connect via putty makes no sense to me.

Guapo said it, I've said it....statically assign an IP to the Linux box so that it never changes. Problem solved. No need to go into the router's management console, no need for one in Windows.

Just FYI, when you asked, "f there is in the Windows (7 in the case) an "admin console" working in the same way as the router's one. In fact is a Windows 7 question, just that." the simple answer is "No, there is no such console" period, full stop.

If you're going to insist on doing things the hardest possible way you can find, here's a tip for you.....in order to find out what the Linux box's IP address is, it's a simple matter to open a Terminal Window and type the following command:

ifconfig

The output is your TCP/IP settings and will show the IP address the Linux box has been assigned by DHCP. Since your two units, whether in an ad-hoc WLAN, or connected to your router's WLAN will be close enough to each other to easily and quickly walk from one to the other, you can find the IP address using this method and then walk over to your Windows box and enter that IP into Putty and then connect.

But for the sake of clarity I will reiterate......this is convoluted and unnecessary if you simply assign a static IP and then save that info into Putty.


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#6
June 24, 2010 at 01:57:56
Thanks Curt.
What you write is the ABC of networking, with the observation, for others that would read this, that it should be ipconfig. Your clarification on Win7 is helpful, for the rest I think I'd have to reformulate but I don't think is of general interest.
Many thanks again!

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#7
June 24, 2010 at 05:17:28
No, Curt had it correct. ipconfig is for Windows. ifconfig is for Unix & Linux.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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