Limited or no connectivity

Cradlepoint Mbr1000 wireless mobile broa...
December 12, 2009 at 16:33:40
Specs: Windows XP Home SP3
I have a wireless network set up using the CradlePoint MBR1000 Wireless Router. We have difficulty getting reception to one of the PC's, and our house is wired with Cat5e, so I'm trying to get a wired LAN established as well. I have connected the router to the house Cat5e wiring, by plugging a Cat5 cable into the LAN1 port on the router, and then into the wall's RJ45 plug. Both of the PC's show the message "Limited or no connectivity. .... This occurred because the network did not assign a network address to this computer" In the Details, it had a physical address that is NOT my PC's MAC address- I don't know what it is. And the IP address is 169.254.243.243. Under Network Connections, it says that it is an Automatic Private Address. My understanding is that it will do this if it can't find the DHCP Server.. but it finds it just fine on the wireless connection. I thought maybe it was getting confused because I had the wireless connection enabled, so I disabled the wireless connection, and tried to repair the Local Area Connection (the wired one), but to no avail. I previously had set DHCP to reserve a specific IP address for my PC's MAC address. I deleted that, and it still doesn't work.

I'm wondering if the IP address that is shown in the details is the MAC address of the router...??? Not sure why it would pick that up, and I haven't been able to find out for sure if that's what it is.

Any ideas on next steps?


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#1
December 12, 2009 at 16:51:53
You're right, IP address 169.254.x.x is assigned, if no DHCP server is found.

If you connect a PC to the wall plug (RJ45), the link LED of LAN1 port on the router should shine.
If it doesn't, try using another port.
If this also did not work, you may have a cable problem.


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#2
December 12, 2009 at 16:57:55
If you have wall jacks, then you should have a patch panel. The PCs gets connected to the wall jacks & the router gets connected to the patch panel or a switch in between if one exists.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#3
December 12, 2009 at 17:42:49
Yes, the LAN light on the router is lit.

Hmm... a patch panel?? Could you tell me more about that? I know I don't have a patch panel. I just plugged the router into the wall jack also (LAN1 port on the router -> wall jack).

When I plug the PC into the router LAN1 port directly (instead of through the wall jack), I think it was fine.

What does a patch panel do?


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Related Solutions

#4
December 12, 2009 at 17:57:44
Of course, it works fine when you connect the PC to the router directly. A patch panel is what's on the other end of the cable coming from the wall jack. I think you're missing some equipment.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#5
December 12, 2009 at 17:59:34
Patch Panel is the terminus where all the cables from your wall plugs meet. Those cables do not usually directly interconnect.

The usual method of connecting is to have a switch with enough available ports to provide one for each wall outlet/cable.

Your router then connects to the designated Uplink switch port.
Many switches do not have a dedicated uplink but will automatically sense and self configure when a router is connected to any LAN port.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#6
December 12, 2009 at 18:10:51
All of the wall jacks are all interconnected. In other words, the cable coming from the wall jack where the router is plugged in connects directly to the cable that goes to the wall jack in my office, and also connects directly to the cable that goes to the wall jack in my husband's office.


In theory, it should act like one single cat5 cable.. I would think.

There aren't currently any switches. It was originally going to be the telephone system, but we have no landline service, and it's wired with Cat5e, so we decided to use it for our network.


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#7
December 12, 2009 at 18:48:03
The only thing that acts like a single cat5 cable IS a single cat5 cable. Computers get connected to wall jacks, not routers.

Wall jacks go to a patch panel. If there is no patch panel, they have to go to a switch or directly to the router & that's only if there are enough ports to accommodate all the PCs.

PCs > wall jacks > patch panel > switch > router or router/modem, depending on the provider.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#8
December 12, 2009 at 19:10:44
basically, your cabling is not suitable for PC networking.
A cable normally has only two ends. How are the cables that come from each wallplug physically joined? Is there some kind of terminal box or are they simply spliced together somewhere?

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#9
December 13, 2009 at 08:07:28
"basically, your cabling is not suitable for PC networking.
A cable normally has only two ends. How are the cables that come from each wallplug physically joined? Is there some kind of terminal box or are they simply spliced together somewhere?"

The cable from the wall jack where the router is plugged in is spliced together with the two cables that go to the wall jacks where the computers are plugged in.


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#10
December 13, 2009 at 11:20:29
You can't splice cat5 cables as if they were Romex.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#11
December 13, 2009 at 13:26:33
Mrs3RRL I seem to have missed something here. You have described only three wallplug ports but you have referred to three cables? If they are indeed spliced, only two cables are required to provide for three ends. If there are three cables spliced that would make for 4 ends.
My recommendation now. If indeed there are only 2 cables , and the splicing was done at/near the terminus where the router is located then: Unsplice the cables and terminate each at a double wallplug. If your wireless router has a built in 4 port switch then connect two LAN ports to the two adjacent wallplugs. If your router has only one LAN port then you will need to buy a switch.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#12
December 16, 2009 at 08:26:07
Thanks, Richard. You're very, very helpful. I think I'm beginning to understand what the problem is. But let me further describe the current wiring. This is a brand new log house, and the house was wired with Cat5 for phones, but we are out in the boonies, and there is no phone service out here, except cell phones. So, there is no terminal box where the external phone line would come in. This represents the original wiring. In the following diagram, XXX is where the phone line would come in, if there were one. There was a single cable to my office (O). Then there were separate cables to each side of the house - one to the master bedroom (MB) and one to the kitchen (K). From each of those wall plugs, a separate cable went upstairs, to each of the guest bedrooms. The cables were, of course, connected at the wall plugs to provide continuity. (well, I've found I can't expect a bunch of spaces to stay where they are, so I've put dots in, to make the lines stay where they should be)

. GB1 . . .GB2
. .|. . . . .|
. MB . . . .K
. .|__O __|
...... |
...... |______XXX

We had our electrician add a direct line from XXX to the basement office. He then tested the continuity, and found that there was some kind of break between the kitchen (K) and my office (O), so he cut the cable at that point, and spliced it together at XX. So, the wiring now looks like this:

. GB1 . . .GB2
. .|. . . . .|
. MB . . . .K
. .|__O....|
...... |.....|
...... |___XXX (all 3 spliced together here)
. . . . . . ..|
. . . . . . ..|
. . . . . . .BO

The router is in GB2, because that's where our air card gets the best reception. There is a PC in my office and one in my husband's office. Our router does have 4 LAN ports. So, I think the error that I made in my thinking was in thinking that everything could go through a single LAN port. I thought that since the MAC address of each PC is different, that the router would be able to tell them apart.

So, in order to have 2 PC's hard-wired, I need to have 2 separate cables, connected directly between the router and the PCs, and they have to be plugged into separate LAN ports in the router?? Is that correct?

If that's correct, then what about the plug in the kitchen? If I leave that in the connection, will it screw things up? Or can I just unsplice the connections at XXX, and run the K-XXX line directly to the basement office? Then, I think I would have to run a separate line from my office up to GB2, to plug into LAN2. So, it would then look like this...Is that correct?:

. GB1 . . .GB2
. .|. . . . .|..|
. MB . . . .|..K
. .|__O. ..|..|
...... |. ...|..|
...... |___|..|
. . . . . ... ..|
. . . . . ... ..|
. . . . . ... .BO
Or, do I need to take the kitchen plug out of the loop also, and make that a specifically direct line from the basement office to the guest bedroom 2?


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#13
December 16, 2009 at 13:03:02
Your final diagram differs from the original configuration only in that there is one less splice in the lines. Each line would still have more than 2 ends and I believe would continue to have "Limited or no connectivity".
Unfortunately you need to run separate cables to each wallplug.
So if your incoming internet connection is in GB2 ( That's the aircard Modem/router?) then you may need five separate cables to each of the places you want LAN access. That's where the patch panel comes in. How many LAN ports are there in your router? If it isn't convenient to physically run 5 cables to GB2 then what you do is choose a convenient point in the home to accommodate the patch panel and a network switch. Then run cables from each terminus to the patch panel. You would then connect from Router to Wallplug GB2. At the patch panel the terminus from GB2 would be patched into the Switch uplink, and then from the other switch ports connect one to each terminus from the other wallplugs.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#14
December 17, 2009 at 09:12:52
Thank you very much, Richard. This is becoming much clearer. I really appreciate your time.

My router has 4 LAN ports, and I only need PC access in my office and my husband's office. The other lines are only there because they are still physically there. I don't need to have access in MB, GB1 or K. So, as long as I can get another cable to GB2, I can plug each of them into separate LAN ports in the router.

Do I need to disconnect the MB-O cable at O, so that cable would only have 2 ends, even if I'm not using the other wall plugs?

At K, the cables aren't 'spliced', per se, but each of the corresponding wires are twisted together in the plug. That plug is a phone plug, not an RJ45 plug - but I believe the rewired the plug so all 8 wires are hooked up. But maybe that still acts as a splice, I have no idea.

Can I leave the connection at K as long as it results in only 2 ends (one end at GB2 and one end at BO)? If that connection/wall plug is part of the problem, is there any kind of connector I can use to make that cable work as if it's a single cable? Or do I need to eliminate that junction, and pull one complete cable from GB2?



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#15
December 17, 2009 at 14:13:14
My recommendation is to eliminate all junctions. Particularly since there is/was a connection in original setup from K to O albeit there was a continuity problem.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#16
December 17, 2009 at 18:12:03
oops, sorry, Richard. I accidently hit the 'bad answer' button by mistake. You have been very, very helpful, and I'll be working on your suggestions. I'm not sure if I can get a cable from GB2 down through both walls, but I'm going to give it a shot.

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