it is enough to hav mac address then why do i

August 19, 2011 at 10:26:18
Specs: Windows 7
since mac address is unique then y ip address is needed while connecting to the natwork

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#1
August 19, 2011 at 10:29:07
Review your course material especially the OSI model for your answer.
Ask yourself if a mac address goes thru a router.

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#2
August 19, 2011 at 12:55:32
Ask yourself if a mac address goes thru a router.

Actually in some circumstances it does, but only when encapsulated within a TCP/IP packet.

Stuart


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#3
August 19, 2011 at 14:11:03
Sorry but I have to disagree. mac address never leaves the lan. no reason for it to do so.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MAC_ad...
note the "physical network segment"

A Media Access Control address (MAC address) is a unique identifier assigned to network interfaces for communications on the physical network segment. MAC addresses are used for numerous network technologies and most IEEE 802 network technologies including Ethernet. Logically, MAC addresses are used in the Media Access Control protocol sub-layer of the OSI reference model.

http://compnetworking.about.com/od/...

note "not across the Internet"

Most computers allow you to see the list of IP and MAC addresses that ARP has collected there. In Windows, Linux and other operating systems, the command line utility "arp" shows this information. Using "arp," you can in fact determine the MAC address of some computers from their IP address. ARP works only within the small group of computers on a local area network (LAN), though, not across the Internet

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#4
August 19, 2011 at 15:22:50
So why is it that people using PPPoEthernet need to tell the there ISP what there MAC address is or spoof their MAC address if the hardware changes.

I don't because I use PPPoATM and the MAC address never gets past the Modem.

For the ISP to know the MAC address it has to leave the LAN.. Admittedly it never gets past the ISP, the Ethernet part is stripped out by the ISPs hardware before onward transmission over the rest of the Internet.

That's what I meant by certain circumstances that only apply to DSL communications.

Before the Internet became ubiquitous the common LAN protocol was IPX/SPX from Novel which did not use IP addresses and therefore could not be routed. It is only since the universal acceptance of TCP/IP that IP addresses are required.

Stuart


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#5
August 19, 2011 at 15:46:48
mac address of the router wan port. You can think of that as a physical segment between the router and the isp server. Point I was making was a lan base mac never leaves the lan.

being an old CNE I can tell you factually that ipx/spx was routable. Netware had built in routing long before Microsoft had a server OS. It just wasn't the protocol chosen for the internet.

So are we doing the OPs homework now? :-)

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