how to convert from wired to wireless router

March 20, 2011 at 23:06:38
Specs: Windows XP
I'm trying to upgrade my existing Netgear wired router to a Netgear N600 wireless router. I was really hoping just to replug in everything and go. But because the wired router is setup for 192.168.1.1 when I plug in the wireless router it thinks nothing is plugged in because it too wants to use that IP address. How do I disable the wired settings? I tried just to disable the LAN but that disables the network card.

Thanks!


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#1
March 21, 2011 at 01:09:46
It sounds like you are trying to connect to both at the same time(?) - this won't work 'out of the box'. It makes no difference if they are using the same ip address - netgear tend to use the same ones by default anyway. Completely disconnect the old router for a start, connect the wireless router with a cable initially, just so that you can set the SSID , security etc. and you can also change the base ip address at the same time (if you still need to use the old router as well, though that may not be wise, depending on your network layout). Once you've got it set up, disconnect the cable, check that the computer can see the router wirelessly and connect to it with your wireless password etc.

"I've always been mad, I know I've been mad, like the most of us..." Pink Floyd


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#2
March 21, 2011 at 07:38:34
Your post isn't completely clear.

Are you trying to replace the older router with the newer one? Or are you trying to plug the new one in to the old one and add it to your network?

If the latter, click on my name above in my repsonse and read my "how-to" guide titled, "Add a second Router to your LAN"

If the former, the issue may be that your ISP requires whatever device you connect to their modem has the same MAC address. So, you would have to find out the MAC address of the WAN side of your old router, and then change the WAN MAC of the new router to be the same.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#3
March 21, 2011 at 09:00:32
Thanks for the replies.

I'm not trying to connect the wireless router to the wired one. I want to replace the wired router with a wireless one. On the wireless router I will have 3 computers maintaining a wired connection, and a laptop that will be used wirelessly.

When I disconnected the old router and plugged in the new wireless one, the router installation software kept on telling me to check my connections because it did not detect anything plugged into it. I'm guessing that's because the computer is still set up for the old router and those settings somehow have to be disabled or removed.


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Related Solutions

#4
March 21, 2011 at 09:21:04
You need to configure new wireless router correctly, probably this wireless network setup tutorial could help you, feel free to take a look.

Hope this helps.


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#5
March 21, 2011 at 09:55:35
When I disconnected the old router and plugged in the new wireless one, the router installation software kept on telling me to check my connections because it did not detect anything plugged into it. I'm guessing that's because the computer is still set up for the old router and those settings somehow have to be disabled or removed.

First, read the setup manual/guide that came with the new router and follow it's instructions. In all honesty, I've never once installed any goofy software that came with the router, it just isn't necesarry. Read the guide through, connect your computer to a LAN port on the router, ensure the NIC on the computer is set to get its TCP/IP settings "automatically" (from DHCP) and you should get an IP from the router and then be able to login to the management interface as per the instructions that came with it.

Once you know that the LAN side is working properly, connect the WAN port to your highspeed modem. If it doesn't work you could have a bad cable or, as I said, before, your ISP has your MAC address registered.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
March 21, 2011 at 10:56:21
That's the whole problem, you don't get any instructions, just a CD that runs a connection wizard. My LAN is configured for DHCP. What I think is happening is the IP address the router wants to assign is already in use by the old router. So how to I get rid of the IP address used by the old router?

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#7
March 21, 2011 at 14:41:23
What I think is happening is the IP address the router wants to assign is already in use by the old router

Ok, this isn't too likely if you've completely shut off and unplugged the old router. There can be no conflict if it's not on and connected.

That's the whole problem, you don't get any instructions, just a CD that runs a connection wizard.

While I've never played with a Netgear SOHO Router I find it hard to believe there isn't a guide or manual in the box or on the CD. Open "My Computer" and go to the drive with the CD in it and look. If you can't find it there, go to Netgear's website and look up "downloads" and/or "documentation" for your model of router. If none of that works, call Netgear's support and talk to them.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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