Home Network setup help

December 20, 2010 at 14:44:58
Specs: Windows 7
I need some help with my home network. Here is the equipment I have.
Cable Modem
5 port gigabit switch
4 port gigabit wireless N router
4 port 100 wireless G router (currently not plugged in)

Currently, I have the cable modem -> wireless N router -> switch. I have a desktop conntected via cat5 the switch, vonage modem connected to the wireless N router via cat5. A several laptops/devices connected wireless. A NAS connected to the wireless N router via cat5. I used to have a couple of other desktops connected via cat5, but have taken them offline.

My question is I want to add the G router back in, but not as a bridge. I want to have a dedicated N network and a dedicated G network. I have 2 devices that can only support G. Will this cause an issue having 2 wireless routers sitting next to each other? Is there a better way to wire things with my current setup? Where should I plug the G router in?


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#1
December 21, 2010 at 01:35:45
Howdy,

This will cause no issue whatsoever. Just make sure that in the settings on the G router, you make sure the wireless channel is different to the one on the N router. Also, you can plug it in anywhere with no issue, but I would *highly* recommend plugging it into the Modem directly.

Matt


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#2
December 21, 2010 at 02:11:29
according to the given requirement i see that you can connect that network.By making sure that the both the wireless networks must not be in same channel like 6 ,1or 11 and also check that what channel u are using previously. And do the configuration correctly in the router so that the channels will not coincides each other.

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#3
December 21, 2010 at 13:40:09
What model Wireless N router do you have? What does the manual say about legacy support for wireless G ?

There is a regular contributor on here named CurtR. Search for one of his posts and link on his homepage. There's an excellent guide to connecting multiple routers.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#4
December 21, 2010 at 14:06:57
Thanks for the info. I'll look into that.

The wireless N router is a linksys wrt320n. I replaced the stock firmware with one from DD-WRT.


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#5
December 21, 2010 at 14:11:19
Thanks Richard59, I get tied of pointing people at that guide.....lol.......I should make up a macro for it that says what I always say, "Click on my name above in my reply and read my 'how-to' guide titled: 'adding a second router....' "

My question is I want to add the G router back in, but not as a bridge. I want to have a dedicated N network and a dedicated G network. I have 2 devices that can only support G. Will this cause an issue having 2 wireless routers sitting next to each other? Is there a better way to wire things with my current setup? Where should I plug the G router in?


Is your wireless N router not G compatible? I bet if you check the specifications on it, you'll find it does B, G as well as N. If it does do G, you do not need to connect the G router.

If it doesn't, then yes, you would need to add the G router.

If it comes to adding the G router, read my guide, use the "LAN port to LAN port" scenario. You could connect the G router to either a LAN port on the N router, or to a free port on the switch (it connects to the N router after all so it's essentially the same thing as plugging directly into the N). Configure it as per my guide.

The big consideration here with dual routers is interferance. When configuring the G router, you would want it on a separate channel from the N. Ideally I would have something like the N on channel 1 and the G on channel 11. Wireless channels do overlap, but you only have to go about 2 or 3 channels over to avoid interferance so you could go 1 and 6 as easily as 1 and 11. Just make sure you have minimum 3 channels between.

I would configure the WLAN on the G router with the exact same SSID and encryption level (hopefully you're using WPA) and password as the N WLAN. If you connect everything correctly and disable DHCP on the G router, it's clients will get their TCP/IP settings from the DHCP server on the N router.

matthew.mcdougall

You said, "I would *highly* recommend plugging it into the Modem directly."

If the OP's modem is not a combo unit then it will only have one LAN port. Even if it had more than one LAN port, you wouldn't want to plug into the modem, you'd want to plug into the N router or the switch.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
December 21, 2010 at 14:18:10
Hi Curt R!

Thanks for the reply. The N router can handle all channels (b,g,n) and is currently setup as g and n mixed. My understanding was that if you have it set in mixed mode, then it more or less defaults to the slower speed. I only have one device that will use G, which is my phone, but all others support N. I have a media player that supports N and will stream HD, so I just want to make sure that has as much bandwidth as it can get.


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#7
December 21, 2010 at 14:19:18
I just googled your router's specs quickly (you responded while I was typing mine up and didn't see it until after) and found this:

Tech Specs
Model: WRT320N
Standards: Draft 802.11n v2.0, 802.11g, 802.11b, 802.3, 802.3u, 802.3ab

As I suspected, your model does G so you shouldn't need to add the G router.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#8
December 22, 2010 at 08:29:38
My understanding was that if you have it set in mixed mode, then it more or less defaults to the slower speed.

No, the router will connect with the fastest possible connection. If the client is G, then it get's a G connection. If another client that's N connects, it will connect at N, not G

I have a media player that supports N and will stream HD, so I just want to make sure that has as much bandwidth as it can get.

Ummm, if you want to stream video you should go wired. Sadly, wireless pays for it's convenience with an inherent lack of security and lag/latency problems. For the fastest, most reliable connection possible you will want to go with a wired connection.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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