duall wireless on one network

May 1, 2009 at 07:53:59
Specs: Windows XP
At our office we have a wireless router and it works perfectly on our broadband connection. What I want to do is set up a wireless long range antenna for transmitting to another building about a half a mile away. Can I keep the present wireless router intact, and set up on the internet another wireless access point to feed exclusively to the antenna for broadcast of our broadband?

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#1
May 1, 2009 at 09:43:32
Yes. You most definitely can. Just be sure to assign the second router that you are attaching to your network it's own static IP address. --and make sure you disable and DHCP service on it as well. If it is a Linksys router, make sure you change the Operating Mode from Gateway to Router.

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#2
May 1, 2009 at 12:17:30
Thanks so much for your help. You guys are great and your help is appreciated!

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#3
May 1, 2009 at 13:12:26
The connection you seek is called a" wireless bridge". This
can be setup with two wireless devices where one operates
as an" Access Point" and the other operates in "station" or
"in client mode". You will definitely need better antennas
than the the little "rubber ducky" antennas that come with
most of the "off shelf wireless routers". An antenna with
higher gain and that is directional is required for best
performance. I don't know that off the shelf units will give you
a lot of bandwidth, (speed) over a 1/2 mile distance. Also A
good Line of Sight(LOS) is important. Imagine the radio
beam as an elongated football shape between the two points
in question. That area should be clear of obstructions, IE
trees and other buildings. The radio power output for wireless
devices is rated in Milliwatts. Typical Linksys type routers
run between 16mW and 32.mW. They are meant for use
within a finite area. I use radios up 600mW to create reliable
links up to 20 miles. Let me know if you need more info.
Good Luck

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#4
May 1, 2009 at 16:25:10
You may also need to check out government regulations on the strength of transmitters allowed. There are reasons why low power transmitters are used for these type connections in the "public" arena. If you use a high power transmitter your signal (Although encrypted) will interfere with any other devices using the same frequency range such as cordless telephones, wireless security cameras, other people's wireless PC networks etc.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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