Solved Direct Cable Connect XP to WIndows 98SE

June 7, 2013 at 13:23:50
Specs: Windows XP
Am having prob's connecting my XP Sys to Wdws98SE Sys to retrieve 1 gb of data files.
Need a step by step config tutorial for Direct Serial port connections. Am using a USB 2.0 Mobile Dock station attached to laptop to have a serial port. XP keeps saying it can't read the modem(Cable) attached to 98 Sys. My 2 Wdw's 98 Sys can talk to each other via direct cable connection, but not XP.
Have also searched for Wdws 98SE USB drivers to update to USB 2.0 from standard 98SE USB drivers to install with no internet access from those systems, so need to download to CD/DVD. Any thoughts? Have spent many many days searching and attempting this. Thanks tons.

See More: Direct Cable Connect XP to WIndows 98SE

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✔ Best Answer
June 7, 2013 at 18:58:59
(1) that does is not compatible with RJ-45 plugs, that network card still has the old plug compatible with a phone jack

That's a dialup modem, not a network card.

If you can't network and you can't use a USB memory key then you do still have a couple alternatives:

1) You could burn the data to CD.

2) You could use a laplink cable and the laplink software. That's if the software still exists and you can find a laplink cable.

3) Alternatively, if it were me, I'd pull one of the drives out of the computer it's in and I'd slave it into the other computer. Drag and drop the data from one drive to the other, then put the slaved drive back where it belongs.

#3 is your best bet.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***



#1
June 7, 2013 at 14:26:42
You don't need a serial port and shouldn't even be trying to use one for this type of transfer. I can think of two faster, easier methods to transfer the data.

Method 1:

Assuming you have a network interface (RJ-45) on both computers the best way to do this is using a crossover cable to connect them.

Then, configure both NIC's to be within the same subnet:

PC 1:
IP Address: 192.168.0.1
Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0

PC 2:
IP Address: 192.168.0.2
SM: 255.255.255.0

Finally, share a folder on one of the computers (lets say PC 1) and map to it from the other. Then put everything you wish to transfer into that folder and copy it to PC 2

Method 2:

Use a 2 GB (or larger) USB memory key. Connect it to the PC with the files you need to transfer. Copy them to the key. Connect the key to the other PC and copy said data off the drive onto the computer's hard drive and you're done.

Either of the two methods above will be infinitely faster than trying to do this via a serial port.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
June 7, 2013 at 14:49:33
Method 3: boot off a Linux Live CD, plug in a USB flash drive, then copy the files from the HDD to the flash drive.

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#3
June 7, 2013 at 15:12:49
why would you bother booting a different OS when 98 which is installed would work just fine?

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


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Related Solutions

#4
June 7, 2013 at 18:49:21
Curt R,
Thanks greatly for response. Unfortunately with legacy systems such as the (2) Windows 98SE systems I still run, (1) has no network card, and the (1) that does is not compatible with RJ-45 plugs, that network card still has the old plug compatible with a phone jack. It does have USB ports, though whenever I attempt to connect my newer USB hardware, it prompts me to update drivers, which I cannot do unless I can download specifically from a site to a CD and then transfer to that system. The internet does not seem to support old Windows 98SE modems or software, or dialing patterns.
Much appreciate the feedback.
Cantankerous9


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#5
June 7, 2013 at 18:57:37
Wanderer,
Thanks for the response. I am not trying to boot a different OS. I run (2) legacy systems because the 3D cad programs I still utilize frequently are based in those 2 Windows 98SE systems. I have configured them to connect, so what I am trying to do now is update all my legacy system files to the newer version of CAD software based on my XP Pro System. It's a licensing cost issue for the CAD Programs. I originally purchased (2) licenses to run on the legacy systems, then another for the XP system. XP can read the older system files, but not visa versa. I am trying to transfer those older 3D designs for use on the newer XP system. Which is why I like to connect the XP system directly to the legacy systems. The files are too large for transport via floppy drive:)

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#6
June 7, 2013 at 18:58:59
✔ Best Answer
(1) that does is not compatible with RJ-45 plugs, that network card still has the old plug compatible with a phone jack

That's a dialup modem, not a network card.

If you can't network and you can't use a USB memory key then you do still have a couple alternatives:

1) You could burn the data to CD.

2) You could use a laplink cable and the laplink software. That's if the software still exists and you can find a laplink cable.

3) Alternatively, if it were me, I'd pull one of the drives out of the computer it's in and I'd slave it into the other computer. Drag and drop the data from one drive to the other, then put the slaved drive back where it belongs.

#3 is your best bet.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#7
June 7, 2013 at 19:03:15
Riider,
Sounds interesting because I just happen to know a programmer that is very familiar with Linux and may have that specific disc or similar. Unfortunately, he seems to want to avoid my computer questions because of his 70 hr weeks, but will check with him.
I just want my legacy data that can't be transferred via floppy drive. An accumulation of 7 years of work.
Thanks
Cantankerous9

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#8
June 7, 2013 at 19:13:52
Curt R,
Again thanks. I have Laplink for Windows 3.11 (ha) and actually use that cable to connect the (2) Windows 98SE legacy systems, and it works with native Microsoft Windows 98SE software. It does not work with the Laplink software, nor does it work with the Laplink File Mover software.
The CD (internal) that is installed on (1) system is a read only drive. I cannot burn to that drive, though I have looked for external drives that I can burn to, it's just that they are not compatible back to Windows 98SE.
I have checked on cables to pull the drive and connect to the XP System, but they also don't seem to be backwards compatible to that OS. You know of a supplier?
Thanks Greatly,
Cantankerous9

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#9
June 8, 2013 at 07:46:22
Again thanks. I have Laplink for Windows 3.11 (ha) and actually use that cable to connect the (2) Windows 98SE legacy systems, and it works with native Microsoft Windows 98SE software

Well then, it sounds like you already have all you need to do the job which leaves me wondering why you posted here to begin with!?!?

As to slaving one drive into another PC. You should already have all the cables you need. Each computer should have no less than one IDE cable with two plugs for drives allowing you to connect two drives.

If you open one box and look at the flat grey cable connecting HDD to motherboard, you should see one free plug. You would use that one to slave another drive into the PC. You would have to check the HDD you're going to slave and ensure it's jumpers are set correctly. There's tons of info on how to slave a drive available so if you're interested, google it.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#10
June 10, 2013 at 13:42:11
Curt, thanks again for the response. The Laplink for Wndows 3.11 does actually not function under Windows 98SE, it locks up the 98SE Systems. As for slaving, the (2) 98 Systems are towers, the system I want to transfer files to is the XP in laptop form. So, the cabling is different than connecting the (2) tower systems. I have actually looked at powered USB to IDE/SATA cable connectors now, and just have to determine if they will function correctly between the laptop and the main tower. Ideally, being that the main tower is still largely used for some of the 3D CAD modelling, the ideal is to still try to directly connect that to the laptop to allow keeping files backed up. I have also started looking at VMWare Player to install on the XP machine, which would the mean having to install Windows 98SE into that virtual machine. Again thanks, PS, you may get a laugh out of this, but the 'old method' of backing up the data on the main system was via a Colorado Tape backup system.

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#11
June 16, 2013 at 19:45:12
Curt, sort of as per your suggestion, I did some online research and found a local Computer store that had an EX-Connect USB to SATA & IDE Adapter kit for 2.5" & 3.5" Hard Drives. Turn off the legacy system, plug in the appropriate cables and power cable, and voila access to that Hard Drive. I'm sort of giddy right now because with this gizmo, I have access to "ALL" my system legacy hard drives, all my old dead laptop hard drives, data and programs. Stellar. Still have to work thru some steps in this solution such as removing system cases and cables, but works great! And all for under $16.00. Have uninstalled the Laplink File Mover software because it does not function with the earlier Laplink serial to serial port connectors. Of course that would still be the easiest solution, but newer systems don't have serial ports, and the cable won't work thru docking station adapters. Best solution so as to not have to crack open the computer cases would be a direct serial to USB port cable. Though some of the software I tried to install that was supposed to be compatible with Windows 98SSE for one such adapter cable, would not install. So that solution fell by the wayside. Have not completed the solutions for installing a Linux system as suggested yet. Have researched multiple Linux Live variations, and was just spinning my wheels to retrieve data. Have checked out numerous Virtual Box solutions such as VM Ware Player, DosBox and others. Am sure will provide some future hair pulling and entertainment. But for now I am happy. Kingwin USI-2535 EZ-CONNECT is currently working wonders. Thank you all for your input:)

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#12
June 22, 2013 at 06:28:40
Sorry I didn't reply for so long. I spent the last week fishing.

I'm very glad to hear you figured out how to slave the drive. That's good news.

Have uninstalled the Laplink File Mover software because it does not function with the earlier Laplink serial to serial port connectors. Of course that would still be the easiest solution, but newer systems don't have serial ports, and the cable won't work thru docking station adapters.

Actually no. The easiest solution would still be to buy Windows 98 compatible network interfaces and install one in each computer and then network them together. Heck, you could get real fancy then and buy a NAS and have them store all valuable data on the NAS.

This would mean only opening the case once to install said NIC (with the exception of the laptop in which you would simply insert the NIC into an empty PCMCIA slot) and thereafter you could fully access each computer from the other if you desired.

You could call a couple local computer stores (I'd stay away from big electronic chains for this) and ask about 98 compatible NIC's. I'm sure you'd find some cheap. Then all you'd need is one cable per computer and a small switch to connect them.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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