Daisy Chain Routers Possible?

September 16, 2005 at 18:13:21
Specs: NA, NA

Is it possible to daisy chain router, via wired and wireless connection. For example:

Cable Modem Out to RouterA WAN Port, RouterA LAN port out to RouterB WAN port, & RouterB LAN port into a PC?

Or Same idea with wireless bridge:

Cable Modem Out to RouterA WAN Port, RouterA wireless out to wireless bridge, wireless bridge out to RouterB WAN port, & RouterB LAN port into a PC?

Are these both possible?


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#1
September 16, 2005 at 20:26:00

It's possible, they way you have physically described the setup would be double NAT'ing.

RouterA WAN port would get your public IP address from your Cable Modem provider.

RouterB WAN port would be a private address from RouterA. The PC would also get a private address. The PC would NAT to the address of RouterB's WAN port, which would then NAT to the IP Address of routerA's WAN port.

The easist way to do this would be to simply connect RouterA and RouterB together via a LAN port on each. Change RouterB's LAN IP address to something different than RouterA's LAN IP address, and disable DHCP on RouterB. The router will then simply be a switch.


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#2
September 17, 2005 at 05:00:59

But why daisy-chain routers? What are you trying to achieve other than unnecessary complexity.

A switch should take the place of the second router for a fraction of the price and far less complex, something you will appreciate when it stops working.

Stuart


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#3
September 17, 2005 at 07:09:56

Well there is a reason or I would not of asked the question. The second router would be a dual WAN port router with 2 incomming broaband internet connections. With failsafe redundancy, and bandwidth sharing. So no, a switch will not help.

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Related Solutions

#4
September 18, 2005 at 16:49:26

Well...nothing personal...but you'd be surprised what type questions are often posted here by folks who have not completely thought through an issue (myself included)....so, it's sorta a time-saver for someone to post a question or 2 first in response.

I may be wrong, but I think it takes a special router to have a "hot" dual isp connection. Both signals have to be coordinated (aggregated into 1) to share the bandwidth transparently (called load-balancing ?) and is a bit too complicated for most of those handy little residental routers. See...

http://www.edimax.com/html/english/products/PRI682.htm

A much cheaper option is a router that has a built-in network modem that will automatically provide (at least) a dial-up backup connnection in the even that the BBand goes down.

In general, though, few really need an automatic full-time dual bband connection for fail-over safety. Those that do can usually afford the fancier load-balancing equipment to begin with.

Since you (or your organization) can evidently afford 2 highspeed connections (assuming you're paying for them) maybe simply purchasing a more expensive router like above would be the best option.

> PLEASE CONTRIBUTE to Computing.net - Report back what did/didn't work for others' reference.<


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#5
September 18, 2005 at 17:05:22

Here's an even better link...with prices. Cheap too (compared to retail anyways).

See #'s 1-3 and 7.

http://www.zipzoomfly.com/jsp/ProductList.jsp?ThirdCategoryCode=040401&SortBy=D


Also....try searching with:
backup "dual" "fail safe" router

It's really cool, you can just copy and paste the above into Google or Yahoo.

As in:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=backup++%22dual%22+%22fail+safe%22++router&btnG=Search

HTH

> PLEASE CONTRIBUTE to Computing.net - Report back what did/didn't work for others' reference.<


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#6
September 18, 2005 at 17:47:08

Well...nothing personal...but you'd be surprised what type questions are often posted here by folks who have not completely thought through an issue (myself included)....so, it's sorta a time-saver for someone to post a question or 2 first in response.

I may be wrong, but I think it takes a special router to have a "hot" dual isp connection. Both signals have to be coordinated (aggregated into 1) to share the bandwidth transparently (called load-balancing ?) and is a bit too complicated for most of those handy little residental routers. See...

http://www.edimax.com/html/english/products/PRI682.htm

A much cheaper option is a router that has a built-in network modem that will automatically provide (at least) a dial-up backup connnection in the even that the BBand goes down.

In general, though, few really need an automatic full-time dual bband connection for fail-over safety. Those that do can usually afford the fancier load-balancing equipment to begin with.

Since you (or your organization) can evidently afford 2 highspeed connections (assuming you're paying for them) maybe simply purchasing a more expensive router like above would be the best option.

> PLEASE CONTRIBUTE to Computing.net - Report back what did/didn't work for others' reference.<


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