Connecting to two Wireless Networks

November 26, 2010 at 01:26:30
Specs: Windows XP
Guys

How do I connect to two Wireless networks using my laptop when in range?

Otherwards, lets say PC A is located in Room A(RouterA) and PC B is located in Room B(RouterB), both with file shares for me to access i.e. shared pictures etc.

My laptop has built in Wireless which currently connects to RouterA SSID (PC A) so is it simply a case of installing a 2nd network card (PCMCIA) on my laptop to connect to RouterB SSID?

My overall goal is to manually assign IP's for each network card within the ranges of each router allowing me to setup short cuts on my desktop.

Thanks

Dave


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#1
November 26, 2010 at 07:22:01
How do I connect to two Wireless networks using my laptop when in range?

If by this you mean, "connect to two separate wireless networks at the same time with one laptop" the simple answer is, you can't.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
November 26, 2010 at 11:30:33
Thanks for the reply

So there's no way using two Network adapters and setting up a bridge between the two routers?

Thanks

Dave


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#3
November 26, 2010 at 13:28:22
The problem is, if you have two separate routers configured for separate subnets, then how do you tell the traffic from the laptop to go to a certain router?

Normally, your NIC get's assigned a "default gateway" IP address which in the case of a SOHO router, will be the LAN IP of the router. If you have two NIC's plugged into two separate routers configured for different subnets, you'll have two separate gateways and no way to tell the outgoing packets which one to choose. Your computer's operating system is not setup to do this

If both routers were configured for the same subnet you could maybe do this but, then the point becomes moot as in the end, the traffic is going out one gateway after all. You can't have two identical (duplicate) IP's on the same network. So you'd have to have the second router pointing at the first as it's gateway and assign it a valid IP (not already in use) in the same subnet.


What exactly is it you're trying to achieve?

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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Related Solutions

#4
June 25, 2011 at 17:27:55
I can connect at two different wireless networks at the same time,
but i don't know if i am getting one dl/ul speed or both together. (when i download stuff)

when i do the speedtest though i see more dl + ul speed than with one network only.
so i guess it does work.

my os: windows 7 home

my wireless adapter: Alfa AWUS036H and DW1520 wireless-n WLAN half mini-card.


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