Configure 2 static IPs over single connection

January 28, 2011 at 07:04:20
Specs: linux
This is the situation in our Lab.
We have one telephone line with broadband connection and a system which is connected to a modem to use this broadband facility. Recently we have taken two static IPs over this connection for a project work.
Now what I want to know is, how to configure these static IPs, so that I can connect two systems (each one to one static IP) to use these static IPs and continue to access the internet in the 3rd (already present) system.

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#1
January 28, 2011 at 07:35:17
We have one telephone line with broadband connection and a system which is connected to a modem to use this broadband facility. Recently we have taken two static IPs over this connection for a project work.

Assuming you mean external IP addersses provided by your ISP, you would need to plug your internet connection into a switch and then statically assign the IP's to the two PC's and plug them into the switch.

ex:

Modem >> Switch >> Client's with static IP address as provided by your ISP

Just FYI, you could connect your modem to a SOHO router and have multiple PC's connected to the internet. The client computers would be behind a firewall and you could use the NAT and DHCP on the router to assign private IP's to the computers automatically.

Typically, paying for static IP's from your ISP is a bit costly. A router would negate the need for any more than one external IP and it wouldn't even have to be static.

If you're not talking about static, external IP's as provided by your ISP, then the SOHO Router idea is still the best one. Just statically assign private IP's in the same subnet as the router's DHCP....just use IP's that are outside the DHCP scope so as to avoid duplicate IP's.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#2
January 28, 2011 at 07:36:56
Hy. Your problem is quite easy to solve. Having a static ip means that your net provider recognizes your pc-s MAC(Physical address) and only that network card can connect.My english is not a 100% but i found a link where explains it nicely. After you have changed th physical addres an the pc which you want to connect to the internet you just get a router switch and connect both pc-s.
Here is the link where is explained nicely.

http://www.mydigitallife.info/2008/...


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#3
January 28, 2011 at 07:50:20
Sorry Gaby but I don't think you understood the OP's question. It's not about mac addressing at all but how to use ISP static ips which CurtR covered

Answers are only as good as the information you provide.
How to properly post a question:
Sorry no tech support via PM's


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Related Solutions

#4
January 30, 2011 at 07:36:12
Hi Curt,
So do you mean, If I connect a switch to the modem and then connect three RJ45 (each one to Static IP1, static IP2 and to a system for normal net access), my problem will be solved. I will test this, by assigning static IPs in two systems and just connecting them to a switch, whether it works and will post the result. It will be an easiest solution if it works.

Anyway thanks for all of you.


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#5
January 31, 2011 at 07:20:57
So do you mean, If I connect a switch to the modem and then connect three RJ45 (each one to Static IP1, static IP2 and to a system for normal net access), my problem will be solved.

If you have static IP's given to you by your ISP, then yes. I see you also say "a system for normal net access" and I wonder what you mean. If you are setup for static IP's, and you have 3 systems, you'll require a static IP (as assigned by your ISP) for all 3 devices in order for them to work.

I will test this, by assigning static IPs in two systems and just connecting them to a switch, whether it works and will post the result.

It should work. With the internet plugged into one port and your 2 (3?) clients into other ports on the same unmanaged switch, they'll all have direct communication with the internet.

Be warned though, you want to run firewalls on every PC connected this way to prevent intrusion.

Do let us know if it works.

It matters not how straight the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate;
I am the captain of my soul.

***William Henley***


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#6
February 2, 2011 at 06:15:56
Hi Curt,

We have a broadband connection to a system and accessing the internet at present. and have taken two static IP's from our ISP.

So, what I mean by saying "a system for normal net access" is that, after connecting two systems for two static IP's, whether we will be able to use the normal broadband connection to previous system (which will be having a dynamic IP). That means internet plugged to one side and 3 connections on other side (2 with Static and 1 with dynamic IP).

Ya sure, I will test this soon and update the result.


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#7
March 16, 2011 at 10:57:21
I am really very sorry for a late reply. I had exams going on that time. It did not work when I just connected a switch in between. Then I did some settings in the website by referring to a pdf file from my ISP, then 1 static IP started working. But they have not explained how to configure 2 static IPs to access using a signle modem. Now I have to search how to do that.

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