Configuration of wan & lan

September 12, 2010 at 05:57:43
Specs: Windows XP prof, 3.4GHz/0.99
I want to use my PC with two network cards to serve as router to provide Internet access to client computers on LAN. When I tried it keeps client computers complained that 'Limited of no connectivity' and my client could not browse.

See More: Configuration of wan & lan

Report •


#1
September 12, 2010 at 06:36:16
That's because Windows isn't made to act as a router. If you have a LAN, you already have a router. Why do you want to change the configuration?

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#2
September 12, 2010 at 06:54:29
If you have a LAN, you already have a router.

Not necessarily. All you need to make a LAN is a switch but you cannot share an internet connection with a switch, for that you need a router.

You can make Windows act as a router, that is effectively what Internet Connection Sharing does. However it can be unreliable and unlike a SOHO router, has no built in DHCP which means that everything has to be configured manually.

Giving Windows direct access to the Internet is not a good idea from a security point of view. You will be far better getting a router and using that to share the Internet out to your LAN. A router will be far more reliable and because it has DHCP, a lot easier to configure and because of Network Address Translation, a lot more secure.

Stuart


Report •

#3
September 12, 2010 at 12:45:36
A LAN without a router is living in the dark ages. So, while it's possible, it's really a stupid idea for the reasons you gave.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 12, 2010 at 13:14:52
Not if you don't want to connect your LAN to the Internet.

A switch is for creating a LAN. If you have no need to connect to the Internet there is no need for a router.

A router is for connecting two different networks, but first you have to create our network and that is where the switch comes in.

It just happens that most SOHO router have a four port switch built in.

Stuart


Report •

#5
September 12, 2010 at 13:47:23
There is no law that says you have to connect to the internet if you buy a router. Even if you aren't interested in the internet, it still makes sense to use a router instead of a switch. The only reason I ever used a switch was to accommodate more machines.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#6
September 12, 2010 at 14:27:51
There may not be a law but that is what they were designed for.

For what purpose would you use a router if you do not intend connecting to the internet, except perhaps DHCP.

Stuart


Report •

#7
September 13, 2010 at 05:43:24
Just to have the option for future use is a good enough reason for me.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •


Ask Question