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Jumping off the Microsoft Megaship

January 14, 2013 at 15:27:25
Specs: windows Vista home premium SP2, Intel Pentium dual Core T4200 2.00Ghz

This may seem of-topic, but here goes:
i've been a Microsoft die-hard since my first experience with DOS 6 when I was 11. Recently tried out a win8 computer but was VERY disappointing. Since then i've been thinking about converting one of my older computers into something more open-source, like Linux. In my point-of-view, Microsoft is turning into a modern-day corporate Titanic, just 'too dang big to fail'.
Could you friendly folks here get me started about various installation hurdles and getting started tips? I could probably muddle through it but in the interest of saving time...
Also, where do i get a copy of Linux?

Am planning on switching out the current 14 GB HDD (yes, that old, but it has important original files that i have yet to make copies of) with a 6 GB blank, just enough to get me started. I think i might be able to get a 50 GB when i'm going full-force.
Thanks for all future help.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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#1
January 14, 2013 at 15:41:04

"Microsoft is turning into a modern-day corporate Titanic, just 'too dang big to fail'."

They did that long ago.

"Could you friendly folks here get me started about various installation hurdles and getting started tips?"

Depending on the age of the machine (if it can boot to CD), start of with live distributions:

http://www.livecdlist.com/operating...

Find one you like, then you can commit. That way, you can try one out before ever changing out your HDD. Remember the live CD's run much slower than an installation---though some have "switches" that allow you to load the entire distro to RAM (assuming the machine has enough to do so)...


"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#2
January 14, 2013 at 15:44:28

It can boot from CD, not THAT old, only win 98.
Maybe you could recommend some program compilers (c++, it's the only one i'm half good at) for Linux? I can't remember if C++ is limited to Windows.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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#3
January 14, 2013 at 16:00:29

http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/Li...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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Related Solutions

#4
January 14, 2013 at 16:04:28

You didn't state the specs for your Linux system. We'd need to know to be able to suggest the best Linux distro for your hardware config. There are literally 100's of distros to choose from & some are more lightweight than others. Personally, I'm a fan of Linux Mint. There's a main version & several sub-versions as well. The main difference lies in the desktop environment that's used.

http://www.renewablepcs.com/about-l...

If you check the Mint website, you'll see Mint KDE, Mint Xfce, Mint Cinnamon, Mint Mate, etc. The desktop environment (KDE, Xfce, etc) determine how things are displayed & how the menus are presented, it can also impact system performance. For example, KDE is more of a heavyweight so more RAM is needed, Xfce is lightweight so you can get away with less.

One good thing about Linux is that most distros can be run directly off a bootable CD/DVD, no hard drive is required. A "live CD/DVD" doesn't perform nearly as well as a full install, but it will give you a taste of what Linux is all about. Most Linux distros are free & downloadable in ISO form. All you need to do is decide on a distro, download the ISO, then burn to a disc using ImgBurn (or a comparable burning program). Then just boot off the disc & take it for a test drive.

http://www.filehippo.com/download_i...

You can find a lot of Linux news at DistroWatch.com. The right hand column has the distro top 100 list. I think Mint became #1 a little over a year ago, dethroning Ubuntu which held the #1 spot for quite a few years. Mint is based on Ubuntu.

http://distrowatch.com/

Another thing to mention is that new Linux versions are released approx every 6 months. For example, Mint 9 LTS (Long Term Support) was released in May 2010 but support ends in April 2013. Mint 10 & 11 are already considered obsolete & Mint 12 support ends in a few months. Mint 13 LTS was released in March 2012 & will be supported until April 2017. And a new version, Mint 14, was just released in December but will only be supported until April 2014.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...

http://www.linuxmint.com/oldrelease...


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#5
January 17, 2013 at 05:47:12

I've been using Unix & Linux since 1998 but not as a replacement for Microsoft. I don't think they are good enough, to replace Windows completely & the main reason is drivers. It's 3 times as hard to get something working than it is with MS.

I don't like Windows 8 either. I may buy another Windows 7 machine, which I really don't need know or try Mac OSX, which has a FreeBSD Unix terminal, in it.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#6
January 17, 2013 at 10:28:21

Mainly hate win8 for the complete lack of backwards compatibility. As if Microsoft wants to forget it's glorious past of the Desktop.

Anyway, here are the specs of the win98 system i'm going to convert:
CPU: PIII at 450Mhz
RAM: 192 mb SDRAM at 100Mhz FSB
HDD: Not sure at the moment but am planning on over 5 GB at the least.
Also has a DVD/CD-R drive and a quad speed CD drive, plus a 3.5 floppy.
Does this help?

P.S did some research and I might put Ubuntu Linux on a seperate HD on my P4.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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#7
January 17, 2013 at 11:50:38

Linux will run on that machine & its a good start. Sooner or later, you'll want newer hardware. When I bought my first Lenovo Thinkpad (3000 N200) it had Vista. I formatted it & replace Vista with FreeBSD 7.0 at the time. It ran really well since it was hardware. I still have the same machine, now with 8.3

Just like with MS, I like to stay one version behind, until the bugs are addressed.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#8
January 17, 2013 at 17:46:54

"Mainly hate win8 for the complete lack of backwards compatibility. As if Microsoft wants to forget it's glorious past of the Desktop."

That was by design. M$ realizes that it has to have a cross-platform base (PC's, Tablets, SmartPhones, etc.) if it wants to survive. Of course they're not going to keep supporting older hardware or devices; hardware manufacturers want to push "newer" and "better" just the same as Microsoft---it's how they make money...

"Anyway, here are the specs..."

That machine would be good for a lighter version of Linux (DSL, Puppy, Slax), but needs more horsepower (CPU/RAM) for heavier distros (Ubuntu, Mint, etc) if you're planning on running anything graphical...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#9
January 17, 2013 at 18:47:16

MS has abandoned more advanced users in my opinion.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#10
January 18, 2013 at 06:08:29

"did some research and I might put Ubuntu Linux on a seperate HD on my P4"

IMO, Ubuntu is a poor choice for a beginner. Make sure your system at least meets the minimum RAM requirement of 512MB (more would be better). I strongly suggest you do a 'test drive' by running it off the Live CD rather than installing it to the HDD. And if you do decide to install it, you might want to consider doing a WUBI install from inside Windows. If you're not familiar, a WUBI install is similar to installing any software program & can be uninstalled simply by going to Control Panel > Add/Remove. If you attempt a full blown installation, you're going to have to deal with the Grub boot loader plus it's generally recommended to install Linux to 3 partitions (root, swap, home). It can be installed to a single partition, but there are reasons why it's better to have more.

Ubuntu Installation/SystemRequirements

Deciding on Ubuntu Partitions and Sizes

Windows installer for Ubuntu


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#11
January 18, 2013 at 06:30:06

I didn't even bother with Linux at first. I started with FreeBSD (Unix). If you ask ten more people, you'll get 10 different answers & be more confused than you are now.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#12
January 18, 2013 at 11:09:45

Agreed. Going graphical I'd personally stick as much ram as possible in the system he is going to trial Linux though.

Going the Linux route is not going to ensure backwards compatibility any more than Windows 8.


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#13
January 19, 2013 at 08:43:28

"Going the Linux route is not going to ensure backwards compatibility any more than Windows 8."

Agreed. Like Windows, backwards compatibility isn't as important with newer distros; though you could try older ones. Again, your Win98 system (as it is now) won't handle the more "popular" versions of Linux. Even your P4 (as stated) may need some additional horsepower...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#14
January 20, 2013 at 12:45:18

Suggest --

hard puppy http://www.puppylinux.com/hard-pupp...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
antiX-12-base-i486 http://sourceforge.net/projects/ant...

as-is your PC: with a swap file
w/512MB RAM: as-is antiX-12-base

Best wishes with the PIII !


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