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/boot, 100% full (corrupted?)

January 22, 2008 at 03:42:17
Specs: RHEL4, 1.8GHz

Hi Linux gurrus

hope you all will be doing well.

Well I am facing a problem first time in my sys admin experience. I am using RHEL-4, I am unable to access /boot partition. when i try to access this partion or want to show its contents, It seems /boot is corrupted. see the following outputs

#ls /boot/
9?^?????tdÜ°??????4?çj?

#df -h
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00
145G 98G 40G 72% /
/dev/sda1 1.4T 1.4T 0 100% /boot
none 501M 0 501M 0% /dev/shm

Note: its showing the wrong entries /dev/sda1 (1.4T) and its 100% full.

#fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sda: 80.0 GB, 80000000000 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9726 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 13 104391 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 14 9726 78019672+ 8e Linux LVM

Disk /dev/sdb: 80.0 GB, 80000000000 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9726 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sdb1 * 1 9726 78124063+ 8e Linux LVM

Can any body help me whats wrong with /boot? Number of applications are being run (24x7) on this server. I cant reboot it and cant interrupt the running applications. Can any body tell me what should i do now?

Server's info:

#cat /etc/redhat-release
Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES release 4 (Nahant Update 5)

# uname -r
2.6.9-11.ELsmp

waiting for an early response.

Thanks
Sam



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#1
January 22, 2008 at 10:04:46

check if you are the admin
if not then you might have permission
problem.
type
#sudo ls /boot/

If this doesnt work then come back

linuxant


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#2
January 22, 2008 at 15:29:01

Run as many backups as you can before you touch anything.

Do some research on LVM problems with RedHat - that is how that smells to me.

Let us know what you find out.

----Edit

What is output of:

cat /etc/fstab

please?

Guy


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#3
January 22, 2008 at 19:14:40

Pretty sure /boot can't be lvm and work. It doesn't look like it at first glance but I guess you could have boot on a lvm. (in which case it should have stopped long ago)

I agree with the backup.

Run a file system check first.

I read it wrong and answer it wrong too. So get off my case you peanut.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 23, 2008 at 01:05:30

thanks to all of you.

please see the output of /etc/fstab

# cat /etc/fstab

# This file is edited by fstab-sync - see 'man fstab-sync' for details

/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 / ext3 rw 1 1
LABEL=/boot /boot ext3 defaults 1 2
none /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
none /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
none /proc proc defaults 0 0
none /sys sysfs defaults 0 0
/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01 swap swap defaults 0 0

/dev/hda /media/cdrom auto pamconsole,exec,noauto,managed 0 0
/dev/sdc1 /media/usbdisk2 ext3 pamconsole,exec,noauto,managed 0 0


please recommend me what sort of backups i should go for before any thing get wrong?

I hope it will work until reboot because upon next reboot it wouldnt find kernal bootup image.


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#5
January 23, 2008 at 16:04:56

jefro - yeah, I know /boot cannot be LVM, but I couldn't tell/wasn't sure from what he had first posted. It should not install that way, but if it does, it certainly should not boot the first time.

sam - I mean backup everything: user data (data bases, all of /home, any mods into /etc, any local installs to /usr/local, everything). It would be best if you could take images. I can not help much more with backups because of the LVM stuff. If the environment was hard partitions, just a partition copy would do in a pinch.

I am anticipating you will eventually have to reboot, and you may have a totally dead system at that point.

Next: On a running system, with /boot assigned it's own partition, you _should_ be able to umount it. So after the backups, try that first:


umount /boot

Assuming that is successful, _carefully_ run a non-destructive check, probably:


e2fsck -n -v /dev/????

You have to know the device. I should have also asked you for contents of /etc/mtab. Figure the device out from there.

Carefully inspect the output, and decide what to do next.

Good luck.

jefro (or anyone else) - does this seem like a reasonable approach?

Guy

---Edit

After looking again at your original output, I am guessing that /boot is on /dev/sda1



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#6
January 24, 2008 at 05:41:04

Thanks Guy,

please see the output of /etc/mtab

# cat /etc/mtab
/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 / ext3 rw 0 0
none /proc proc rw 0 0
none /sys sysfs rw 0 0
none /dev/pts devpts rw,gid=5,mode=620 0 0
usbfs /proc/bus/usb usbfs rw 0 0
/dev/sda1 /boot ext3 rw 0 0
none /dev/shm tmpfs rw 0 0
none /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc binfmt_misc rw 0 0
sunrpc /var/lib/nfs/rpc_pipefs rpc_pipefs rw 0 0


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#7
January 24, 2008 at 16:53:06

I agree with Guy's responses. All the replies seem to be proper and useful.

Check the filesystem and see if it complains. I doubt it could hurt.

Wonder if it is a permissions issue?

Many ways to go. Not sure we have had any responses from the suggestions.

Can you reboot this to a diagnostic live cd?

I read it wrong and answer it wrong too. So get off my case you peanut.


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#8
January 24, 2008 at 17:13:40

Yeah, even 24 hours later I would try:


umount /boot

And if good, then like:


e2fsck -n -v /dev/sda1 2>&1 | tee fdisk.log

I think you will have to try this or something like it sometime.

Guy


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