Windows Reboots for no reason?

Micro star / HOME BUILT
March 5, 2009 at 12:02:24
Specs: Windows XP, Intel Celeron 3.2 / 512Ram
I am sure that this question has been posted a few times. I just need a few ideas. My computer reboots frequently for no reason. This is due to a hardware conflict I assume. My question is how can I tell what size my power supply is without tearing my case apart to look at it.
My drivers are updated via windows update should I download drivers from individual vendors? Everytime I log in after a "spontaneus" reboot windows error reporting tells me that "my system has recovered from a serious error" can I interpret this info in the log file in anyway to narrow down where I should be searching for the problem? Is there a way that I can test the RAM to see if the problem is memory? How low does the free disc space have to be before problems are created? Would a BIOS flash be worthwhile? If you can answer any or all of my questions I would be very thankful.

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#1
March 5, 2009 at 13:44:20
I had a problem similar to this and it took me almost 6 months to
figure out what was actually going on. I found that in Windows XP
there is a way to hide the BSOD. So when you receive one, it
looks like the computer is just rebooting on its own. I don't
remember where this setting is, but I remember getting to it from
the system properties. I'd look for it myself, but I am no longer
running XP.

EDIT-
Its located at System Properties > Advanced > Startup and Recovery > Automatically restart


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#2
March 5, 2009 at 13:58:47
See event viewer logs first.

"Best Practices", Event viewer, host file, perfmon, antivirus, anti-spyware, Live CD's, backups, are in my top 10


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#3
March 5, 2009 at 15:29:37
Test the RAM with memtest-you can download it, burn it to a CD, and then boot up and run it.
Go into the BIOS and check the cpu temps.
I would *not* flash the BIOS.
Low disk space would probably not cause your computer to reboot. How much disk space is left by the way ?
You can use a oprgram like Windebug to open the crash dump and get some info about the BSOD in addition to using event viewer.

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Related Solutions

#4
March 6, 2009 at 03:56:09
I just added a new 320gb S-ATA drive and moved files around so the drive with my OS has atleast 32gb out of 40gb, my application drive has about 68gb out of 80gb free and my storage drive has 220gb free out of 320gb. So I don't think storage will be a problem anymore. I did find 2 problems last night, antivirus software license ran out and this reported a error after a reboot and also an uninstalled driver. It hasn't rebooted since I installed this driver so maybe this was the problem. I will check the memory tonight and post the results. My cpu right now is running around 40 deg_C under load, This gets a little hotter when I overclock but not much. I will also check out the Windebug program to see what it tells me. Are the crash dump files archived on the computer anywhere? Thanks for your help everone.

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#5
March 6, 2009 at 04:00:47
Overclocking can make your system unstable too. Depends on how you do it and how far you go.

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#6
March 6, 2009 at 07:02:42
I always overclock using the utility from my motherboard supplier so that I can monitor it from my desktop. It is a program called Core Center from MSI. Is there better overclocking utilities out there? I usually will only overclock if I have alot of stuff going on or am using a program that takes up alot of resources.(ie Video Converting) When I overclock I usually keep it below 3000mHz and I am running a Celeron 2.4gHz Processor. The computer will shut off at 3600mHz and give me an error about something being to tight. (it has been 4 yrs since I overclocked it so it shutdown). As soon as I am done what I am doing everything is put back to default.

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