Why do power supply units keep blowing up?

May 12, 2011 at 03:48:57
Specs: Windows 7, Intel pentium II
Help, anyone. I dont know what to do anymore. I recently built my own computer to sell. It had a 430W PSU in it. I brought a wireless internet adapter for it and a few cooling fans. I switched it on, ran normaly for about 20 seconds and smoke came pouring out the PSU. I unpluged it immedantly after that.

I brought a new PSU 500W (dont know why i didnt go higher) but i did, when i finnished installing it, it had problems turning on and stuff. When it did come on, it made a poping noice and again smoke poured out. After that i was real angry.

Third time buying, and this time a 1200W PSU, I thought i couldnt go wrong with this one. When i installed it, it was running fine, not a problem at all. Gave it a week and still was running good, then one afternoon when i was about to pack it up in the box, thought i might give it one more test. I switched it on, but when i plugged in the VGA cable while the computer was running it just turned off. Turned it on again and AGAIN the smoke came pouring through,
also killing my motherboard my CPU and wireless adapter.

After a long strike of anger i decided to give up building computers forever. But why did this happen? please i need to know why. If anyone knows or you think you know please comment.
Thanks.


See More: Why do power supply units keep blowing up?

Report •


#1
May 12, 2011 at 03:56:24
Technically, this should be in the Hardware forum. Nevertheless, you didn't mention any of the manufacturers of the power-supplies in question (many of them significantly over-state their wattage). But if you blew up 3 of them, then likely something is seriously wrong with your build. The obvious (original problem) would be hard or intermittent shorts or a seriously underrated supply (which you should have determined before your next P/S purchase). You could have damaged something else somewhere in the system (leading to the 2nd and 3rd ones failing), or the short still existed.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


Report •

#2
May 12, 2011 at 04:23:59
hey, T-R-A. Thanks for commenting, oh yeah the brands on the power supplies.
The 430W PSU was a Cooler master that was brand new.
The second one was a 500W PSU came with my new computer case, which was a Tsunami 2105b. It didnt look that new either.
The third was a Ritmo Force 1200W gaming PSU.


Report •

#3
May 12, 2011 at 04:51:26
I would say that in your case you should get more experience before trying to assemble computers for sale.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
May 12, 2011 at 05:26:13
Im only 14 and i have only been building computers for 2 years. so yeah lol.

Report •

#5
May 12, 2011 at 05:31:33
It sounds like your mother board is sitting directly on the chassis without the spacer posts or that something is touching the surface of the motherboard and is causing a short. Also it is possible that you have a wire tucked out of the way but it is running through something sharp on the chassis or is pinched between components when you tightened things down. Another possibility is that you mixed up similar connectors, possibly front panel connectors, and that is where the problem is. The next thing that comes to mind, is that you used a conductive thermal paste and put on way too much in installing the CPU heat sink and your short out is there (or a heatsink backing plate was installed without insulating spacers). Finally, there is the possibility (remote but possible) that you have a bad motherboard from the start, but this would take a lot of investigating and eliminating of all other possibilities first, but if the board is now fried, you may never know for sure if you do not find something that definitely looks like a major error on your part. Take this as an expensive lesson and an opportunity and investigate as thoroughly as you can (maybe get a friend to help) to see where/if you went wrong.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#6
May 12, 2011 at 06:54:32
phi11

Do you actually have Windows 7 running on a PII?


Report •

#7
May 12, 2011 at 19:45:21
Hadn't noticed that.... I doubt that he would be trying to sell a system with a PII in it....I doubt anyone would purchase one now. That would be more of an exercise for someone who had parts at home and was snowed in (way op north somewhere)... maybe by the third day anyone would get bored enough of watching weather reports on the TV. Probably a P4 though.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#8
May 13, 2011 at 01:06:21
Hey guys, my computers details are:

Asus P5G41T-MLX
Windows 7 Ultimate 32-bit
CPU: Intel Pentium II
2GB RAM DDR3
500GB hard drive
DVD WR drive
Wireless internet adapter
x2 120mm blue led fans

I dont know if that will help, but just to let you know. Thanks bros.


Report •

#9
May 13, 2011 at 01:27:28
Wow it is possible http://www.tomshardware.com/gallery...

rating of 1.0 in the pics on the link

Tandem Support

Tandem Web Design


Report •

#10
May 13, 2011 at 02:03:16
Hey Othehill, sorry i didnt anser before. yes i do have windows 7 with a Pii in it.

Report •

#11
May 13, 2011 at 02:07:30
yeh that must be really slow.....

with all the money you spent on PSU's you could have got a new mother board and core due or P4 depending on how much money you have.

Tandem Support

Tandem Web Design


Report •

#12
May 13, 2011 at 02:10:58
That MB is a socket LGA775. I am thinking the poster means a Pentium Dual Core.

Likely


Report •

#13
May 13, 2011 at 02:12:12
If it is a PII I am betting the hammer used to get it in there caused the issue.

Likely


Report •

#14
May 13, 2011 at 05:55:45
This is the board listed:
http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/In...
It has G41 chipset and and Socket 775 and supports Core 2 series processors and Core 2 based Pentiums, not PII's (Pentium II processors could not find a home here). It has to be one of the 'E' numbered Pentiums.
Including the CPU number would have been helpful here.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#15
May 13, 2011 at 05:59:55
heyy, i was talking about: Pentium dual core. I just used the (ii)

Report •

#16
Report •

#17
May 13, 2011 at 06:15:31
Woah!, that was one prehistoric processor. lol i should start saying things right.
WOO! i9 every nerds dream....

Report •

#18
May 13, 2011 at 06:18:13
phi11

Out of curiosity, how much of the hardware you ruined was replaced by RMAing it, if any?


Report •

#19
May 13, 2011 at 06:21:35
lol yeh have you never seen one before? there good for DIY jobs when there is no hammer available.

Think thats what il get in my next laptop lol got current one last june.
Processor type : Intel® Core™ i5-430M Processor
clock speed : 2.26 / 2.53 Turbo GHz
Front Side Bus : 1,066 MHz
3rd level cache : 3 MB

System memory:
standard : 4,096 (2,048 + 2,048) MB
maximum expandability : 8,192 MB
technology : DDR3 RAM (1,066 MHz)

Graphics adaptor manufacturer : ATI
type : ATI Mobility Radeon™ HD 5165 supporting HyperMemory™ technology
memory : 1,024 MB dedicated VRAM (total available graphics memory using HyperMemory™ technology can be up to 2,298 MB with a 32-bit operating system and 3 GB system memory or 3,322 MB with a 64-bit operating system and 5 GB system memory)
memory type : DDR3 Video RAM (resp. Video RAM and system memory combined)
connected bus : PCI Express®

£800

Tandem Support

Tandem Web Design


Report •

#20
May 15, 2011 at 00:13:25
hey, Othehill. I actully never knew you could do that, with shocked components.
Thats awsome, how much do think it would cost??

Report •

#21
May 15, 2011 at 00:16:45
Lol, sure have seen one of thoughs. Wowie and sweet laptop you got there :). I badly need to upgrade mine lol, so old now.

Report •

#22
May 15, 2011 at 06:08:09
I am not sure what you mean by "how much would it cost"? Some (most) hardware that is returned to the vendor for warranty replacement is damaged by user error. This type of damage is not warrantied by the manufacturer but it happens anyway.

Your attitude about the problems you have had is unfortunate. You indicated early on that you were building a computer to sell. You don't seem to know much about how to properly select and assemble components into a stable working computer.

I suggest you troll here and other forums to pickup more knowledge before trying again. And leave the reselling to the pros.


Report •

#23
May 15, 2011 at 14:31:53
"If it is a PII I am betting the hammer used to get it in there caused the issue."

I lol'd.

Super PIII | Unlocked ES Tualatin @ 1.8GHz (150x12, 1.65v, 512K L2)
2GB PC2700 | 500GB | Radeon x1950Pro | Apollo Pro 266T | Win 7 Pro


Report •

#24
May 16, 2011 at 01:12:18
About the power supply problem--is the AC cord a 3-pronged grounded cord and in good condition?

Ding dong the witch is dead. . . .


Report •

#25
May 16, 2011 at 05:30:12
hey Dave, naa, i dont think it is grounded, and yeah it was pritty old. Hey maybe that was the ression for all thoughs faltailtys. I remember having that cord for alot on computers.

Report •

#26
May 16, 2011 at 05:38:51
othehill. Dude i have sold alot of computers in my time. I have spent so long studying computer s--- before i even started selling. This was just bad luck. something i didnt thought would be a problem aswell. Sometimes i cant (afford) to buy high end s---. But they still runs sweet and i get buys.

Report •

#27
May 16, 2011 at 05:48:50
You are deceiving people into thinking that you know what you are doing. One blown PSU? Maybe. Three, incompetence.

All that would be OK if these were for you only. You just know more than the folks you are selling to.

As far as "i have sold a lot of computers in my time" goes, I would like to know how old you are. You don't appear to have that many years under your belt.

Even your #25 response where you state you are using a power cord that is not grounded. Geez!


Report •

#28
May 16, 2011 at 06:16:12
very true OtheHill.

non-grounded Kettle lead :/ worried slightly.

i built my first PC 6 years ago when i was 15 i had spend 4 months researching about building computers before i built mine and i had never built for other people as you can get a lot of problems selling on with out the experience to fix then and the hassle if people complaining when they don't work after 2 months.I have always done repairs but never builds for others.

Tandem Support

Tandem Web Design


Report •

#29
May 16, 2011 at 22:50:53
I've only "sold" a couple computers. These were old used by me or my family but in still good working order. I have however been contracted to build in the neighborhood of 60 computers. I'd have to check my records but I remember #50 and that was a while ago. That being said using an old ungrounded power cable on a new PSU????? Maybe I am wrong but everyone I have purchased so far, and in my just a few years of doing this has been over 70, came with it's own brand new cable. Yes when I build myself a new system I too have just used the cable from the last one to test the new equipment and unless I sell the old system I keep those used cables in case I need one. I never have. Hmmmm another weekend coming to clean out old junk.

Likely


Report •

#30
May 17, 2011 at 22:44:37
Phi11, trial and error is a good way to learn. I was fortunate in that I had virtually an unlimited supply of cheap computers I got at auction to learn on. And it's good to have a forum like this in which to ask questions or to just check in on to see what's being said about similar problems.

Ding dong the witch is dead. . . .


Report •


Ask Question