Solved What CPU and Motherboard should I upgrade to?

May 31, 2016 at 17:27:48
Specs: Windows 10
I know nothing about Motherboards and CPU's. What I got right now is what came with my computer and other than my sound card and my tower itself (lol) is the only thing I have not up upgraded.

The mother Board is a H8-1414 and the CPU is a : AMD 6120 Six Core.

I don't know jack about motherboards, but my other hardware is Radeon r9 280 for graphics if that is important at all and I just upgraded my Ram, so now I got like 24GB of ram I think now from the 10 the computer started out with.

I don't know anything about what a Benchmark is or what that means,. but there are two things I do know.

1. More cores = better. The way I figure it is that more cores the better! I want an eight core of some kind, I know that much.

2. Higher Benchmark = better.

So, with that in mind, I need a CPU that has a much much higher benchmark that will hopefully cost me under $400.00 and a much better motherboard. Not because I think mine is bad, I am sure there is nothing wrong with it, It's just that it is the only thing left to upgrade unless I want to spend another 500+ dollars on another graphics card for no apparent reason.

I need suggestions on what to get.


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✔ Best Answer
June 3, 2016 at 06:13:19
Aside from upgrading video card, power supply, and adding memory when lacking, I have found that the upgrade path part by part does not work out well for the system or the budget. You are always choosing items that are compatible with outdated existing hardware so they are not the optimal choices and then when you have the cash for the final 'change the rest of the guts' (like now), nothing is cutting edge and you have to eliminate a lot of choices to be compatible all over again with what you already sunk in money for and do not want to throw away. The best way to get the best performance for your budget is to start with a clean sheet of paper and choose all of your components with the performance in mind and the available funds. If you have to cheap out at all then make sure that your core components are up to speed and either reuse the graphics card, get less memory, or something equally easy to replace/upgrade later when you can afford it. You do not have to have the most expensive item either, there is always the slightly slower processor or the one generation behind the that will be more affordable. The motherboards should be nether the fully loaded most expensive nor the cheapest but something above the middle of the road or the lower of the gaming boards which has enough features to keep you happy for the long run. Plan on getting an SSD drive for the operating system and programs/games (minimum 120GB but 240GB is better) and a hard drive for your storage drive and make sure you relocate your Documents, Pictures, Music, and other default folders to that drive so you do not fill up your C drive.
The case needs to be quality, have enough space for your needs, long enough for a graphics card upgrade, roomy enough to deal with the heat until it is sucked out, have reasonable cooling potential (more on the below), and and lastly, looks good.
I have found that the secret to good cooling is to forget about what is included with the case and choose your fan(s) for yourself. I purchase a rear exhaust fan that is dual ball bearing with a high CFM and low Db rating as this is the really only important fan you will need and less air means less cooling but a noisy fan means an annoying machine. IF you get a case with the bottom mounted power supply, are running a hot CPU and graphics card, you may want to add a top secondary exhaust fan but you can wait to see if you need it until later. When you have two, three of more drives blocking some of the air from getting to your graphics card, you can opt for a front intake fan low in the front. This fan needs to be quiet but not needed to be high CFM and actually should not be because you want a negative pressure to be caused by the exhaust fan sucking the cool air in where it is needed. NEVER use a side fan. EVER. Side fans disrupt the air flow over components and causes little eddies in the flow causing stagnant pockets of air that overheat components.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers



#1
May 31, 2016 at 20:10:23
Motherboard will depend on the CPU you end up with.
"1. More cores = better." Not necessarily.... Please look at the chart below. You will notice quite a few 4 core Intel CPU's beating the pants off AMD 8 core CPU's.
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...
Here are the exact stacking up of all of them:
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/
If you want to go by the numbers, these are them and a graphic evaluation you can see.
Then decide what fits your price range and select the motherboard that fits.
Make sure the motherboard has the features you want but you do not need to go with the top of the line, just a decent one with enough features to cover all of your needs now and through the next few years at least.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
June 1, 2016 at 01:38:33
I am thinking about that AMD FX 9590. Is that a good one to go with?
I heard it has a lot of cooling issues but it does sound nice! Although I am not totally opposed to using an Intel I generally have a habit of sticking with the first brand I ever buy with anything and that is AMD for me. Basically almost my entire computer is AMD something.

message edited by Vasarto


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#3
June 1, 2016 at 01:57:26
Your MB does not support all AMD processors:
http://support.hp.com/us-en/documen...

Changing MB may mean changing case, unless you can find MB with the same connector panel position.

Save more money and build a new box later....


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#4
June 1, 2016 at 04:47:26
ok, thanks.

I am still ticking around for different stuff. CPU and Mother boards are stuff I know basically nothing about actually.

Right now, I am looking at benchmark vs price and general opinion etc and I have found the following for CPU so far.

Intel Core i7-5820K
AMD FX-8350
AMD FX-9590
AMD FX-8300
Intel Xeon E3-1231 v3
Intel Core i5-6600K
Intel Core i7-6700K
Intel Core i7-5820K

No idea what to look for in a Motherboard. Haven't gotten there yet. Basically, I just bought two 8 GB ram cards so with what I had already, I am now up to 28GB of ram. 3 8's and a 4.

I already upgraded the crappy graphics card in the computer from whatever the hell that crappy thing was to the R9 280 that I am using now and sound card is of zero importance to me. I replaced the power supply with something I don't remember, but its a good one I know that much because I looked at like 5 different "best of" guides and Price vs how much power vs silence it has, it had the been on all of the lists for it.

Keyboard, Mouse, and my desk and my chair have all been upgraded before moving onto the MB and CPU lol. So, all that is left is those and then the tower if I need to get a new case too which I am basically just going to get whatever looks coolest and can fit the stuff inside of it.

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#5
June 1, 2016 at 14:21:34
I don't know what you do that would require 28GB RAM but your current memory configuration is less than optimal. By not installing matched pairs, the system drops out of dual channel mode. You're losing 50% of the potential memory bandwidth by running single channel mode. Plus the best RAM for an FX-series CPU is DDR3-1866.

"The mother Board is a H8-1414"

No, that's the model number of your computer. You have an HP ENVY h8-1414 desktop: http://h20564.www2.hp.com/hpsc/doc/...

The motherboard is an M3970AM-HP (Angelica2): http://support.hp.com/us-en/documen...

Since you have an AMD motherboard, you MUST use an AMD CPU & it must be compatible with the board. Of the CPUs you listed, the only one compatible with your board is the AMD FX-8350. Personally, I think you'd be wasting your money. If you want to run an Intel CPU, you will have to replace the board, which means Windows will have to be reinstalled from scratch. Not only that, but if you upgraded to Win10 from the original HP Windows installation, you will NOT be able to reinstall Windows using the HP product key because the key it tied to the original HP board.

The power supply is arguably the most important hardware component in a PC because everything depends on it. The fact that you replaced it with "something I don't remember" doesn't give a warm fuzzy feeling about your choice. PSUs get discussed in these forums a lot. A decent quality unit should be 80 plus certified, a single large (120mm or 140mm) cooling fan, a single +12v rail of 30A or more, active PFC, enough plugs & the correct type(s), 3-5 warranty, reputable manufacturer. Wattage? It's not the most important thing to look for. If all the other requirements are covered, the wattage will take care of itself. Minimum 400W, depending on your hardware configuration.

I suggest you do a LOT of reading before pulling the rigger on any hardware purchases. I have a feeling you're on the wrong track & just want to upgrade for the sake of upgrading, rather than upgrading wisely for peak performance.


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#6
June 2, 2016 at 15:48:09
@riider -

I did a ebay search and this was the Power supply I purchased.

SeaSonic G Series SSR-550RM 550W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PL

message edited by Vasarto


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#7
June 2, 2016 at 17:26:12
Not a horrible choice, but you could have got a Corsair 550W with similar specs for just $36 (after coupon code & rebate) which is 1/2 the price of the SeaSonic SSR-550RM.

Corsair 550W: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

SeaSonic 550W: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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#8
June 2, 2016 at 20:28:00
Another consideration: You probably have some combination of DDR3 memory, most of the newer Intel CPU's run on DDR4 memory so for those, it will nt be useful at all.
What riider said about matched memory sets is very important to memory performance so always purchase memory in matched pairs and if using more than two memory cards, it is best and easier to set up if you purchase two exactly the same memory sets so all (4) sticks are the same.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
June 3, 2016 at 01:49:30
OK. I remembered reading something about that matched pair thing before. I picked up some a two pack of 8gb PNY ram for my computer that I have so far which runs the DDR3's since that is what I can use.

So my first two slots has those two in it and then I have what I had left over from before which I might swap out later which is the two 4 gb chips that the computer came with. Eventually when I get a little more money, I will replace the other two with the same ones I bought before.

@rider oh well lol. . I got my PS from a youtube video I saw. I did a bunch of research on what I needed and after reading a bit on it and looking at several tech videos it was the one I decided on at the time. Both the Power supply and the Graphics card I picked up were both chosen the same way basically. I asked around for tips on some decent upgrades that my case could handle and those were the ones suggested to me. Besides, nothing wrong with sea sonic! I think it is the best brand imo. You think of the sea and you think of fun times had at the sea, and fun times are made with video games too so seasonic is more fun!, then sonic means fast and faster equals a better gaming experience which means you will be having more fun and have more speed to do things faster which means you did more and had more fun doing stuff thus seasonic is just the superior choice! By that logic you cannot deny that! Trollololol.

At that time I basically needed it just so I could play fallout 4. The card it came with had been playing almost every game somewhat decently until then. Could even handle Skyrim on lower to mid graphics if I didn't mod it at all lol. Now, I am basically just wanting to junk the rest of my computer slowly and I sort of plan on having everything eventually replaced by about Feb next year since that is how long I figure it will take me to get a second job and start making enough money to put towards it.

So, I have a lot of time to do my research and start making decisions. Plus, I can give my old computer junk to my dad who is still using a computer from back when Windows vista was still brand new. I think he got it day one when Vista came out and the computer itself was made out of like 4 year old technology since it was on sale for half off and already incredibly cheap as it was back then. The only thing replaced was a broken ram chip for one of the same size. Not one single upgrade on it....yeah..Ick.

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#10
June 3, 2016 at 06:13:19
✔ Best Answer
Aside from upgrading video card, power supply, and adding memory when lacking, I have found that the upgrade path part by part does not work out well for the system or the budget. You are always choosing items that are compatible with outdated existing hardware so they are not the optimal choices and then when you have the cash for the final 'change the rest of the guts' (like now), nothing is cutting edge and you have to eliminate a lot of choices to be compatible all over again with what you already sunk in money for and do not want to throw away. The best way to get the best performance for your budget is to start with a clean sheet of paper and choose all of your components with the performance in mind and the available funds. If you have to cheap out at all then make sure that your core components are up to speed and either reuse the graphics card, get less memory, or something equally easy to replace/upgrade later when you can afford it. You do not have to have the most expensive item either, there is always the slightly slower processor or the one generation behind the that will be more affordable. The motherboards should be nether the fully loaded most expensive nor the cheapest but something above the middle of the road or the lower of the gaming boards which has enough features to keep you happy for the long run. Plan on getting an SSD drive for the operating system and programs/games (minimum 120GB but 240GB is better) and a hard drive for your storage drive and make sure you relocate your Documents, Pictures, Music, and other default folders to that drive so you do not fill up your C drive.
The case needs to be quality, have enough space for your needs, long enough for a graphics card upgrade, roomy enough to deal with the heat until it is sucked out, have reasonable cooling potential (more on the below), and and lastly, looks good.
I have found that the secret to good cooling is to forget about what is included with the case and choose your fan(s) for yourself. I purchase a rear exhaust fan that is dual ball bearing with a high CFM and low Db rating as this is the really only important fan you will need and less air means less cooling but a noisy fan means an annoying machine. IF you get a case with the bottom mounted power supply, are running a hot CPU and graphics card, you may want to add a top secondary exhaust fan but you can wait to see if you need it until later. When you have two, three of more drives blocking some of the air from getting to your graphics card, you can opt for a front intake fan low in the front. This fan needs to be quiet but not needed to be high CFM and actually should not be because you want a negative pressure to be caused by the exhaust fan sucking the cool air in where it is needed. NEVER use a side fan. EVER. Side fans disrupt the air flow over components and causes little eddies in the flow causing stagnant pockets of air that overheat components.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers


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