USB DVD burner quits while burning

Maxtor Diamondmax 10 hard drive - 120gb...
March 9, 2011 at 05:57:49
Specs: Windows Vista, Intel Quadcore 4GB
During several years I used an external USB burner/drive TSST SE-S204N with Nero 8 and CDBurnerXP without any problem (under Vista). The other day I installed a new USB-Hub and since then it doesn't burn DVD's anymore: it gets stuck at 1-3% and displays (in CDBurnerXP) the following error message: devNTSPTI_IO_Error SCSI Pass-through Interface I/O Error - 0xFF0079 Could not write to disc (LBA 77016 length 32). In Nero the result is simular.

The discs themselves are from the same box as before, so that can't be the problem. On the (failed) DVD there is actually some information which you can play if you enter it in the drive. However, a movie with just the first 5 minutes (or whatever) is no use. Reading DVD's is no problem with the drive.

The burner is still on the same USB-port (though I tried an other port as well) and is directly hooked up to the existing USB-ports of the computer, so not to the new USB hub. I looked at the energy use (mA) and the USB-bandwidth but both seem to be alright. On the same USB controller 2 other hubs and in total 4 other devices are (now) connected.

In the windows log there is the following warning (over a 100 times!): An error was detected on device \Device\CdRom2 during a paging operation.

I hooked up the drive to another computer (XP) and... it did burn, though slowly (could be the computer too: it is very slow and it was downloading winodws updates at the same time).

Does anyone has any idea what might cause this? All help is welcome.


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#1
March 9, 2011 at 07:39:24

"I hooked up the drive to another computer (XP) and... it did burn, though slowly (could be the computer too: it is very slow and it was downloading winodws updates at the same time)."

Apparently the minimum recommended for the SE-S204N is CPU Pentium 2.8ghz or above, so if the computer is slower than that or if it's slower for other reasons, the burning would be slower.

Samsung (TSSTCORP) SE-S204N Manual
http://www.samsungodd.com/UploadFil...

So it appears there's .nothing wrong with the external optical drive itself.
........

Your problem is probably directly related to you adding the USB hub.

External hard drives and external optical drives require that the USB connection has to be able to supply the full 500ma the USB specs specify.

In Device Manager - USB controllers, the Power info for the Root Hub the external drive is connected to probably says Power required 500ma for this external drive - Windows probably gets that from an *.inf file or similar and that isn't necessarily what the drive is drawing at that moment or can draw.

Burner drives draw the max power from the USB connection while burning, a lot less when just reading a disk.

If the computer you had the external drive connected to when you got those errors is a laptop computer, some laptops cannot support USB devices drawing 500ma per built into the laptop USB port when there is more than one device plugged to the built in USB ports. If only one device that requires 500ma is plugged into the built in USB ports that device works fine, but when you also plug in other USB devices into the built in USB ports, at least one of the devices plugged in will NOT work fine if one device requires 500ma.

If you connect only the external drive to the built in USB ports, it will probably burn disks fine.
....

If the computer you had the external drive connected to when you got those errors is a desktop computer
- the external drive should be plugged into a USB port directly connected to the mboard

- the wiring between a case USB port and a USB header on the mboard, or between a port in a plate in a slot space on the back of the computer and a USB header on the mboard, may not be adequate to support drawing 500ma from it or it may be unable to support a USB 2.0 connection properly.

- some multiple USB ports on the front of a case may not be each be connected to one USB header connection per port - they may be two or more ports connected asa hub to one USB header connection and be sharing the 500ma available. Usually the two front ports near the bottom of the front of the case DO each have their own USB header connection.Ones higher upon the front of the case often do not

If you have a desktop computer, Note that I answered a Topic on this site where a guy had an external drive, which does require the full 500ma, connected to a port on the back of a desktop case - it would not work properly when a webcam was in the port next to it, but it worked fine when the webcam was unplugged. Ports on the back of a desktop case often have two ports connected to the same USB controller module that are ports one above the other - you could try connecting the cable to one of those and leaving the other un-used.
......


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#2
March 9, 2011 at 08:33:56
Thanks a lot for the answer. There is a lot what I am starting to understand now. First of all, the Vista machine (the one where I could not burn DVD's) is a desktop and I did connect the burner to the back of the desktop. Still it was on the same hub/controller as some other periferals connected to the back of the computer. So probably they were sharing power.

In the Device Manager it actually stated that the burner took 2mA, together with the other devices it added up to a total of 104 mA, so I thought that would be enough. Of course if I cannot trust these figures it changes it all. Of course the burner does have a power supply of its own, or doesn't that change anything?

Anyway, I just tried to burn a DVD without the two external USB-hubs. This meant that a.o. a webcam/camera and an external disk were disconnected. The burning process worked flawlessly.

I also noticed that booting the PC was a lot faster. Other times (with all the USB-periphirals connected) the boot process was a lot longer and sometimes even seem to stop. As soon as I then disconnected the external HD (actually just switched it off with the power button), it immediately resumed its boot with no further problems.

It seems that the power to the burner isn't sufficient. Could that be solved by putting a PCI/USB card in the computer, so creating a seperate USB controler and hub?

Or, another brainflash, could it be the total power supply? How can I find out?


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#3
March 9, 2011 at 13:19:05
You might have this situation - in that case try not plugging in anything in the port on the back above or below where you plug in the USB optical drive....

If you have a desktop computer, Note that I answered a Topic on this site where a guy had an external drive, which does require the full 500ma, connected to a port on the back of a desktop case - it would not work properly when a webcam was in the port next to it, but it worked fine when the webcam was unplugged. Ports on the back of a desktop case often have two ports connected to the same USB controller module that are ports one above the other - you could try connecting the cable to one of those and leaving the other un-used.

When you don't have enough directly connected to the mboard USB ports on a desktop computer, if you have spare PCI slots, buy and install a PCI USB 2.0 controller card in a slot - it will have 2, 4, 5, or 6 USB ports (up to two inside the case on the card)
However, don't install it in the PCI slot that shares it's IRQ with the video - you're likely to have problems with any card except a PCI video card when it's in that slot. That's usually the PCI slot on the end of them closest to the center of the mboard. If you have a generic system, the manual for the retail mboard model often shows you which slot shares it's IRQ with what.
If you need more USB ports at the front, use short individual USB extension cables (type A male to female) between a port on the back and run the female end around the front.

"Or, another brainflash, could it be the total power supply? How can I find out?"

If the USB optical drive or a USB external hard drive works fine in any built in port, there's probably nothing wrong with the computer's power supply.

You can check the current voltage, temp, and fan speed readings in the bios Setup, e.g. listed under Hardware monitor or similar.
If what is supposed to be + 12v, + 5v, and + 3.3v is within 10% of the nominal values, there's probably nothing wrong with your power supply.
USB uses only + 5v, so a USB connection can only supply + 5v.


Or, another brainflash, could it be the total power supply? How can I find out?


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