Unable to see BIOS blue screen on booting OS

Microsoft Windows xp professional w/serv...
September 10, 2009 at 21:09:23
Specs: Windows XP
Yesterday when I was just attempting to Reset my Bios settings, unfortunately I was unable to see my Bios (the blue screen where we have option to press ). My system was not able to boot. The light on motherboard and Fan of CPU etc all, are functioning properly.
I am unable to see The First motherboard bios screen. Even when I inserted windows Bootable CD, still it did not take me to set up windows installer.
The last time when I shut down my machine, it was logged off successfully, reached to save windows settings and had not come out from here so I manually reboot the system.
I have two HDD 1. SATA 2. PATA, the OS is on SATA. Two days before I had the same problem but once I had inserted my windows cd, changed first boot HDD to SATA, everything worked fine. I dont know how it became PATA on that time. But today, seems same problem arises and nothing is happening.

See More: Unable to see BIOS blue screen on booting OS

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#1
September 10, 2009 at 21:19:17
A common thing that can happen with ram, even ram that worked fine previously, is the ram has, or has developed, a poor connection in it's slot(s).
This usually happens a long time after the ram was installed, but it can happen with new ram, or after moving the computer case from one place to another, and I've had even new modules that needed to have their contacts cleaned.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

See your Owner's or User's manual for your brand name model, or the mboard manual for your model if you have a generic desktop system, if you need more info about how to properly remove and install the ram modules.
.......

If that doesn't help.....

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
Check your PS.
They often partially work, fans and hard drives may spin, leds may come on, yet you may get no video and the mboard will not boot all the way.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

If it is failing, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS with the same capacity or greater.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD!)
You can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements.
Some power supplies have more than one +12v amperage rating - in that case you add the rated max amperages to determine the total +12v amperage rating.
..........

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

(thanks to Dan Penny for this link:)
Hard Drive Diagnostics Tools and Utilities
http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibilty, on another computer if you need to.

If the hard drive itself tests okay, any data problems found can be fixed, one way or another.


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#2
September 10, 2009 at 21:33:50
I guess, the poor connection could be an issue. I will do this and let you know. Can you tell me if light is coming on the board, Fan is running so it sounds like mother board is working fine, isn't it? My main worry is that board were not be lost.
I observed -
1. If I boot the system, keep it at idle for some time, the Fan restart in a frequent interval.
2. I removed both HDDs and CD Rom connecting to Mother board, still I could not see the very first bios blue screen.
3. I removed jumper from board, and restart the machine.. it was beeping and once I down the machine and reconnect with the jumper, similar behavior appears.

Do you have any thought of, that, if I could have windows 98 bootable CD or bootable Floppy, it will make difference?

I am in office currently so try your options once I reach to home.


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#3
September 11, 2009 at 03:10:16
normally how do you mannage to go to BIOS? by pressing DEL/F2? in any case press itfrom the time you turn on your system i.e. simultaniously you should get BIOS screan if not BIOS may be faulty

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Related Solutions

#4
September 11, 2009 at 03:26:45
I tried with Del and <F2> both. Your are right, BIOS become faulty. Can you please help me how do I make correct?

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#5
September 11, 2009 at 07:53:54
"Can you tell me if light is coming on the board, Fan is running so it sounds like mother board is working fine, isn't it? "

Those things can be working, yet your system won't boot all the way because of problems with hardware - most likely the ram connection is iffy or the power supply is faulty.

" My main worry is that board were not be lost"

Usually there's nothing wrong with the mboard or the cpu - processor - usually something else is wrong .

"If I boot the system, keep it at idle for some time, the Fan restart in a frequent interval"

Which fan?
Did you have the case opened up and you actually saw that, or you didn't and are assuming a fan is restarting by what you heard?
The cpu fan should never stop spinning, but it might spin faster when the cpu has warmed up some, then slow down when it gets cool enough. Some power supplies have fan s that respond to temperature the same way. Some case fans have a temperature control and may respond to temperature the same way, but that's rather uncommon.
Are you sure it's a fan you're hearing? If you have a disk in a CD or DVD drive, Windows spinsthe disk at random times and when it does, the led on the front of thedrive doesn't necessarily light up. Remove any disk you have in a CD or DVD drive to eliminate that possibility.

"I removed both HDDs and CD Rom connecting to Mother board, still I could not see the very first bios blue screen."

That has no effect on whether the mboard works properly, unless one of the drive's board is seriously defective, which is quite rare. The mboard itself should work fine, and you should be able to get into the bios and navigate it's pages, even when no hard drive is connected, if nothing else is wrong.
NOTE that you usually can't use a mouse in the bios - you usually can only use keyboard keys.

"I removed jumper from board, and restart the machine.. it was beeping and once I down the machine and reconnect with the jumper, similar behavior appears."

Which jumper?
If you mean the clear cmos jumper, you're supposed to move it to the clear position, when the AC power to the case/ PS has been removed, wait a short time, then move it back to the normal position, then restore the AC power to the case/PS. You're not supposed to run the computer when the jumper is in the clear cmos position. In most cases you do not remove the clear cmos jumper, you move it to other pins - the mboard cannot work normally if the cmos jumper is on the pins for clear cmos, or if the jumper is removed when it isn't supposed to be removed.

"Do you have any thought of, that, if I could have windows 98 bootable CD or bootable Floppy, it will make difference?"

Your problem propably has nothing to do with the data on the hard drives - it's probably caused by a hardware problem of one sort or another.

The specs you supplied state this computer has XP on it.
- a Win 98 or 98SE CD cannot recognize the partitions on the hard drive, and can't see any files or folders on the partitions, unless they are using FAT32 or FAT partitioning. XP only allows you to use FAT32 partitioning if the partition is smaller than 32gb, and even then NTFS partitioning is selected by default.
So - a Win 98 or 98SE CD is useless regarding seeing whether the data on the hard drive is okay, if the partitions are all using NTFS partitioning.

- If your computer has a floppy drive, certain programs on a floppy disk can be useful - e.g. you can test the ram or the hard drives - but there are few that can examine the contents of the data on the hard drives.

- Certain bootable CDs or DVDs other than a Windows XP CD in a CD or DVD drive can be useful if you need to fix some problem with the data on the hard drive, or you can test the ram or the hard drives.

"I tried with Del and <F2> both. Your are right, BIOS become faulty"

Your symptoms do not necessarily indicate your bios is faulty - almost always, there's nothing wrong with it, unless you attempted to flash the bios and haven't said so and that was not successful. Your symptoms are probably caused by a hardware problem of one sort or another.


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#6
September 14, 2009 at 00:18:55
Tubesandwires -

The summary of your note is - there should be a hardware problem. What hardware problem you suspect? Can you please list down for me?

Thanks,
Chitwan
India


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#7
September 14, 2009 at 01:13:40
Are you using the keyboard that came with the computer? If you have switched to a USB model or a wireless model it is possible that is why you can't enter the BIOS screens.

Blue screens are indications you have already started Windows.

There are no blue screens in the actual POST/BIOS screens.


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#8
September 14, 2009 at 01:18:48
Yes, it is wireless key board. And it is not the factory fitted key board. When I put wired key board, I could not see the motherboard screen,
The blue screen meaning, the screen where we see to press <F2> to go in to the Bios.

Thanks,
Chitwan
India


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#9
September 14, 2009 at 01:35:29
"When I put wired key board, I could not see the motherboard screen".

Did you connect the original keyboard BEFORE powering up?

Is the original keyboard USB or PS/2 type?


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#10
September 14, 2009 at 01:44:01
It is not USB type, it is PS/2 key board. I have assembled system so it not the original key board.

Thanks,
Chitwan
India


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#11
September 14, 2009 at 06:06:51
Connecting a PS/2 keyboard to the system before starting it up should allow you to access the BIOS screens by tapping the Del key continuously when starting the computer. If I misunderstood what you meant by "assembled system" then the keystroke may be a different one but the timing is the same.

Did you clear the CMOS by removing the battery or using the jumper prior to this issue?


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#12
September 14, 2009 at 07:19:21
Yes, I tried with removing jumper and reconnect but did not help. I also contact to intel support. Finally they were agreed to generate a replacement order for the MB. Lets see how it works.

Thanks for your responses. It was really helpful to find out the problem.

Thanks,
Chitwan
India


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#13
September 14, 2009 at 07:38:26
If you moved the clear CMOS jumper while the computer was connected to AC power it wouldn't actually clear. If you attempted to run the computer with the jumper in the clear position you may have damaged the motherboard.

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